Skip to main content

Full text of "Page 6 Magazine Issue 32"

See other formats


The Magaz«je 
ftpalMWW 
computers 



Issue 32 March/ April 1988 



WHIST 

Type it in! 




£1.20 





L 



H!?:lUiluM[1J: 



For vour 1029 or E 



R-E-V-l-E-W-S 



NIGHTMARES 
MIRAX FORCE 
NEW INFOCOMS 





SECRETS 

Programming graphics on 

your ST 

TURBO 

DIZER PC DITTO 

Low cost digitising 



& 



EXPAND THE CAPABILITIES 
OF YOUR 8 BIT SYSTEM 

au?cklv transforms your Alan into a powerhouse, radiating with innovative 

?«Tu^ SS Ee possessed by a 1050. Features like t™d«£le density 

or greater storage, single and dual density support, an ^^^ ^ r ^ t 

designed to triple your speed when combined with SpariaDUS and run 




US Doubler 



designed 10 triple your s[ 
compatibility with existing Atari software 

US Doubler two t hip set and fitting instructions 

1 his Disk Operating System has been widely at claimed as the best DOS fur 
[he 8 b AtaTi range® S^artaDOS from ICO supports *™^*™™$£ 
drives through RAM disks to hard disk,. A special menu allows awd transfer, 
erasure andlocking or unlocking of files using only *£^™*J^^ X 
Stin and Select keys. 1 he utility package supplied also features a ,i2 character 
keyboard buffer intelligent switching between disk densities, a binary file 
game nienu r subdirectories and time/date file stamping. 



£29.9: 



SpartaDOS complete with 175 page 



manual ■■ £»-* 




SpartaDOS 

Construction Set 



THE PERFECT COMBINATION - SPARTADOS AND U5 DOUBLER -ONLY £49.95 






Now vou're no longer limited to Atari compatible printers and modems. The 
PR Connection clues directly into the serial disk drive port o any 9 bit 
Atari coTotteTand p ovides the user with a standard Centronics printer 
fntJ "rfSTES Vo rI-232 serial ports. It also draws its power from your 
computer which means one les/cord fighting for a power point while its 
compact size leaves your work space virtually clutter tree. 

The PR Connection's serial ports use a fully compatible R: handler and 

resemble those of the 850 interface with the same signals and functions 



PsRiConneclion 



P;R: Connection and man 



ual - ■ £69 ' 95 



MicroEI 



XL 



Supra s MicroPrint is a parallel printer interface for the Atari 8 bit series of 
computers which plugs into thexomputer's serial peripheral por and then 
directly into the printer. It works with most parallel printers andfi b.i software 
and includes a built-in printer cable. 

.. £29.95 
Microprint ■*■■ ' 

The SuDraDrivo AT 20Mb hard disk for the Atari XL and XE series connects 
direrfly P £ The computer's parallel bus. **™™M# |jP«d » « 

r^ tlJt n'f w in rvtwi fwtps oer second (approximately 10-1 r i times taster wan ine 
£^SS X'supraDriv^T stores more ^n *^J^* 
inn eiiwlp nWisitv Atari disks and can access any miormation vuimn 
2 nSli 5 ecInds d AH ft S adds up to an extremely efficient system lor the ser.ous 
Atari 8 bit owner. The SupraDrive AT is supplied with hard disk interlace, 
built-in power supply, manual and SpartaDOS. 

£-•49 95 
SupraDrive AT ready to plug in and use - 

Rambo XL transforms your B00XL into a mighty 256K .compute! -and mates il 
memory compatible with the 130XE. Now your XL car ^support Basic XE 
extended mode or the standard RAM disk supplied with. Atari DOS 2 ,. Wrth 
the RD COM handler supplied with SpartaDOS you get a 192K RAM disk 
enough to duplicate a fulf double density disk in one pass' You must supply 
eighl 256K DRAMS and the DOS of your choice. 

Rambo XL with fitting instructions 




£29.95 




RAMBO X 



ALL PRICES INCLUDE VAT AND DEI IVERY 



ip Frontier P.O. Box I I >. Harrogate 

l_J Software Telephone: 042 \ 67 I4() 



North Yorkshire, HC2 "BE, England. 





- 



ATARI USERS 



MAGAZINE 



Issue 32 



March April 1988 



'The Magazine 


for the 


Dedicated Atari User' 






14 




19 


l LISTINGS v ■ 1 ■ 


REVIEWS \ 


GRAPH MAKKR 


INFOCOM ... AHEAD OR BEHIND? 


Three different graphs on your printer 




by John Sweeney 




by Jason Peasgood 




GUILD OF THIEVES 


24 


TENNIS 


22 


by John Szveeney 




A two player game 




SPARTADOS U.S. DOUBLER 


26 


by Christopher Jones 




by John S Davison 





by Christopher Jones 




by John S Davison 




WHIST 




TEN PRINT 


70 


Two classic games of skill and luck 


58 


by Phil Cardwell 




by Les Hotaarth 




GAMES REVIEWS .„ Nightmare ... Mirax Force ... 


I FEATURES! ■■■■■■■■ttt™ 


12 

28 


Little Devil ... Talladega ... Amaurote 


76 


THE QUESTION MARK AFFAIR 

by Allan Palmer 

TUTORIAL SUBROUTLNES 5 


1 STAGE the PAGE 6 ST section 1 


34 


PROSPERO FORTRAN 


by Ian Finlayton 




by Matthew Jones 




THE PAWN 


64 


THE SERIOUS ST ... Macro Assembler ... 




Is it really as good as the others say? 




Jackmakc ... Quick list ... 


35 


by Garry Francis 




PC DITTO 


38 


EXPANDING YOUR ATARI 


66 


TURBO DIZER 


40 


A new hardware series 




by John S Davison 




by A4ark Fotvlis 




ST SECRETS 


42 


BUBBLE BUBBLi: 


72 


by Cairn Cox 




Sorting routines tutorial and programs 




ST GAMES ... Defender of the Crown ... Frosthi 


r te 


by Gordon Cameron 




... Winter Olympiad 'SH ... Tangle wood 


48 


FIRST STEPS 


80 


SWITCH IT 


56 


by Mark Hutchinson 




by Les EUingham 





REGULAR DEPARTMENTS 




Editorial 

Listing Conventions 

News 
Letters 


4 ST News 
6 CONTACT 
8 Turbo Basic 
10 Update 


33 
63 
74 
81 


BACK ISSUES 


17 RESOURCE FILE 


82 



NEXT ISSUE ... 

HEAVY METAL ... Another great machine language 

game from Paul Lay with 35 separate screens! Maybe his 

last 8- bit game? 

PRINTERS ... What tan you use with your Atari? Plus 

peripherals and programs 

On sale 2Sth April. Copy date 21st March 



All original articles, program* and OTllCi material 

in PAtJK h is copyright of the author as credited. 
All united ited material is copyright PAGE ft. 
Unless, containing the try-lint 'All Rights 
Reserved' any material in PAGE t may he 
rcpnnJuctd by User Groups and other non- profit 
making organisations provided that the author'* 
name is included and j'AOE o i$ Credited as the 
origin il publisher. PenniSKKHi to publish 
elsewhere should be obtained Irom PAGE b or the 
author. Editors of newsletters reproducing 
material are requested BO vend a copy of the 
relevant issue lo [he Editorial address of I' A t i P. t>. 
Ift'hihi »r take whatever steps we can to ensure the 
.iM\-i i. ■. ,-.f articles .mil; programs and (he contents 
of advertisements, Page ft canned be held liable for 
any errors or claims made hy advertisers, 



PAGE fi is. published ru -monthly i>n ihe I si 
of each alternate month. 

PA* iE G is .i usera' magazine which relies entirely 

i*fl readeti support in submitting articles and 
programs. The aim is to explore ATARI 
computing through the exchange nf information 
and knowledge. \V"e will pay for articles and 
programs where appropriate and we hope rhiit 
readers will enjoy seeing rheir woflc published. In 
turn we hope thai Mbct readers will learn from the 
article* and programs submitted and increase their 
enjoyment of Atari computing. 

ATARI'™ ' is a registered trademark of 
ATARI CORP. All references should be 
w noted. 



Subscription raies — annual i> issues: 

U.K. £ 7.00 

Europe £1130 

Elsewhere- Surface £11,50 

Elsewhere - Ail jfj 1 7 . "5 0- 

Single copies anJ hack issues at one-sixth of 
the annual rates. 



l>ist subscription (Mngiiiinr and I>i»h> 



U.K. 

Europe 

Elsewhere Please ericjuire 



£30.00 

£37.50 



Please maks- cheques payable to PAGE *> 



Editor & Publisher: Les EUingham Correspondence: PAGE 6 Magazine, P.O. Box 54, Stafford, ST16 1DR ; ENGLAND 
Editorial; Les Ellingham 0785 213923 Advertising: Nicola Parry 07g5 213928 News trade Distribution; Seymour 01 733 4444 
Printed by: Stephens & George 0685 5351 Typeset by: Htmrds Typographies 0785 57700 




51 edit^^' 



474fl/ USERS Wtf 



Issue 32 March April 19&S 



'The Magazine for the 
Dedicated Atari User 1 

ISSN No- 0952-4967 

THE CREDITS 

Full 'official' credits are on page S, here 
arc the people who made it possible. 

Les Ellmgham did the Editing 

Nicola Par ry baked after the ads 

Phil Cardwell gave valuable Editorial 
Assistance 

The Regular Contributors are ... 

Garry Francis 
Mark Hutchinson 
Matthew Jones 
John Davison 
John Davison jr 
John Sweeney 
Paul Rixon 

The Cover illustration and sundry 
other illustrations are by 
Barry Armstrong 

All other contributors for this issue are 
credited alongside their articles or 
programs. Thanks to everybody for 
contributing and thus helping others* 

Very Hid? inspiration for thin issue! Those 
who did feefc include Chris R*a ' especially 
Chisel Hill I, Run Rig, RwA« Hmxm, Em 
Clapwn ( Yts!t,5«* Hammer. Van Morrison 
< again! >, Bruce Hormby. The makim in tfm 
magical isles did not help at till.' 



Serious? You bet! But Atari ia supposed 
to fun as well isn't it? 

The next issue of PAGE 6 could feature 
YOL'R article or program. So, send it! 



PAGE 6 K pal. tegtther almost entirely nith Atari 
tquipnttntandtoftmart. HaiaKan used: lUiXE, 

tOiO disk drive, 310 disk drive, 850 Interface, 
modem, SEC 8023 primer, IC40ST. SMt24 
mooter, Atari SH2Q4 hard disk drive, Eptom 
RX100 printer, Micrott^fftr Buffer. Software used? 
SuptrKnpt, Turbo Basic.. Tito-Talk, Kenmt, Prmt 
Wis and several custom wwrwi utilitiet on the S-Ht. 
STwriW, PC Inttramm, Thunder and Fleet Siren 
Publisher on the ST. 

Copy ii prepared one! 30XE using Superscript and 
various custom written pmgtm i l and then transferred 
(0 the ST Via S-bil Kermti and PC IttUttamm. It H 
then spill chtckid W*I* Thunder and the iqjAMI 
drafttd with Fltet Street Publitter. Finished etrpy is 
output from, the ST to a Konttet 2 cattette machine 
and then, fed into a Monfiiype Lattrtvmp typesetter. 



130XE VERSUS ST 



Most ST owners who have not 
previously owned an Atari will naturally 
think that their lb bit computer is 
superior to the 8-bit Atari- Those who 
have upgraded' CO an ST will also 
probably feel obliged to defend their 
decision and many existing 8-bit owners 
will feel tinder increasing pressure to sell 
up and buy an ST- But why? Is the ST 
really superior to the Atari XL or XE in 
all respects? Much depends on the 
software available and whilst in some 
areas the ST is certainly superior, in 
other, quite surprising, areas the good 
old 130XE is more than a match for the 

ST! 

One of those areas is quite surprising 
- word processing! Now most people 
will think that word processing on the 
ST must be infinitely superior but it just 
ain't the case! This issue of PAGE 6 is 
the first where the word processing has 
been done entirely on the ST and it may 
well be the last! The reason for going 
over to the ST was the advent of Word 
Perfect, hailed as the ultimate word 
processor, which can certainly do some 
amazing things but whichdn its current 
version , has a number of bugs and 
, deficiencies and, unbelievably, can't do 
the one thing I need which is to save 
pure ASCII text! The two features I 
need from a word processor are- 
keyboard macros and the ability to save 
ASCII text with no added carnage 
returns, line feeds or control codes, I 
want exactly what I type to be saved on 
the disk but, despite the claims, there 
dots not appear to be one word 
processor on the ST which can do this 
and which also supports keyboard 
macros. On the 130XE I know of three 
word processors which can achieve this 
and which also contain 95 "„ (or more) of 
the features that any average user will 
require. These programs arc 
Superscript, Paperclip and, the biggest 
bargain of all, TextPro which is 
available in the public domain. Is it not 
truly amazing that an Atari 8-bit public 
domain program can out-perform many 
commercial programs on one of the 
world's most powerful home 
computers? 

A CONTINUING PROBLEM 

This lack of software support really 
highlights one of the main problems 



with the ST and a problem which has 
plagued Atari all along. Despite the 
wealth of software released, much of it is 
not up to the standard available on other 
machines and the ST is just not 
supported in the way it should be. A 
stroll round the recent Which Computer 
Show proved the point. There was 
hardly an ST to be seen anywhere. You 
could find one here and there brought in 
by those companies who have supported 
Atari for some time such as Mirrorsoft 
and HB Marketing but most visitors, 
unless they were looking hard, would 
have gone away completely unaware 
that an Atari ST can be used for serious 
applications- Even companies like Word 
Perfect Corporation and Cashlink 
Software, who both produce top 
business software for the ST didn't have 
an ST on their stands! 

AND THE WINNER IS ... 

Back to the ST versus the XE For 
my money the 130XE is the outright 
winner as far as word processing goes. 
All the features that 1 need in a word 
processor are available on the 1 30XE 
and those extras that are on the ST I 
don't really need. Add to that the ease of 
programming the 130XE and in using 
DOS 2.5 (there are times when GEM 
can be more of a hindrance than a help) 
and there is no contest. The 130XE is 
friendlier, easier to use and, in this area 
at least, just as capable as the ST. 
Controversial comments? Yes, but these 
arc the facts. If any ST users can come 
up with a compelling argument the 
other way I would be pleased to hear it. 
Better still, maybe someone could come 
up with some software that is as good as- 
Superscript or TextPro! 

When you think about it, the reason 
why the Amstrad is so successful, is that 
it does exactly what people need and no 
more. It is certainly not as powerful a 
computer as the ST but it does its job 
and so does the 130XE. [f you are 
thinking of dumping that XL or XE, 
think again [ Unless there is something 
you really need that you know the ST 
can do and your 130XE can't, don't 
bother buying an ST Just stick with 
one of the best h«me computers ever 
produced- You probably don't realise 
just how good it is.! 



Page f> - Issue 32 



. 



CTA/^I/ COMPUTER 
I AW IV PRODUCTS 



CENTRONICS PRINTER INTERFACE 

400, SOO, XL, XE (Any e Bit Atari} 




I 



TYPE 72000 

• ANY CENTRONICS PRINTER 

• NO SOFTWARE NEEDED 

• ALL CABLES SUPPLIED 

• EASV TO USE - JUST PLUG IN AND GO 

• TRANSPARENT & CONVERSION FEATURES INCLUDED 

• FULL VEARS WARRANTY 



FREE 40 PAGE 

CATALOGUE ON 

REQUEST OR WITH 

ORDER 



MEEDMOEE LIMITED 

28 Farriers Way, N*th*r1on ' 

Mersey *ide L30 4XL 
Tel 051-521 2202 



ARE YOU MISSING OUT? 

You've <JQl lots at questions about your computer but don '1 
know wha to ask! We do 1 You're nol sure which software is best 
for youT application! We do! You'd like In keep up fodfiteutnlh 
new releases and be sure I hey are a good buy. but who's going to 
lell you? We will! Youu.ould love to gel lo know other Atari 
en I h usiasts. but you don 't know how? vVe do' Yo j wan ( to gel 
some of that 'Public Domain' software youVc heard about, bui 
where from? We know' Ynu dgn't warn io feel like you're the 
unly Atari owner in the worSd, but where can you turn too' Well, 
we can help' Great, hut who are you?? 

We are I he largest (and oldest) Atari Computer Owners Club 
hi rlie U.K. For just £5 00 per year you get help, assistance, hint?., 
tips, friends, pen pals, access to PD software, up <o dale 
information, games, utilities, hardware projects, software 
reviews, programming tutorials, and a glassy dub magazine 
euery quarter. 

A dub magazine as well!? One of those photocopied things 
that is unreadable, eh! WeShtu, it's pro fessionallu produced, j list 
like this magazine you're reading. It's called MO'IHITOH, you may 
have heard of it? Yes, friends of mine have read it and say it's 
greal! How do I join the club and get my copy of MONITOR? 
Easy just send a cheque or postal order for £5.00 lo the address 
below requesting a lour issue subscription. Overseas 
membership is ES.Q0 1 surface ) or £ 1 2.00 ( Airmai I ) . 

You won't be disappointed N 

The U.K. Atari Computer Owners Club 
P.O. Box 3, Rayleigh, Essex, SS6 SLR 

Independent User Group 



/ 



/ 



/ 



DESK DEALS... 

WITH NEW LOWER PRICES, 
FREE PLASTIC LIBRARY CASES 
AND FREE & CLASS DELIVERY 

SW Blank Bisks 



QUALITY BULK 

Fully Guaranteed 
Individually Certified 
Tested 1 00% Error Free 
FREE - User Labels 

FREE - Top Quality 
"SLIMPACK" Plastic 
library Case with 
every 10 Disks 



DD 100L - 5'/V J DISK STORAGE BOX 

• Holds 100 Disks 

• High Quality 

• Impact Resistant Plastic 

• Smoked Hinged Lockable Lid (2 Keys} 

• Supplied with Dividers/" 



GQ.49 

avaf ex. vat 



inc, VAT = £10.91 



from 






rjfil** 



s piH o 11 '^ 

Campumart 



JUBILEE DRIVE ■ LOUGHBOROUGH 
LEICS LE11 0X5 
Tel. 0509 610444 (1 lines) 

f Prices A Delivery Subject fp A vaifability E. A Q,E.) 







LU 

O 




« 


> 




LU 


ec 




LU 


LU 




H 


Cfl 




Z 
< 


0. 

1> 




< 


xl 




■=> 


u 




<S 


< 


> 




QQ 


IT 


LU 




LU 


_l 


a. 


> 


LU 
< 


O 


_l 


1- 


oc 


LU 


< 


LU 


G 


UJ 


0. 


LU 


□3 


=> 


LU 


<£ 


LO 


ac 

LL 


P 





10 


«* ■ ex. vat 

inc. VAT = £6.69 




50 


mmmmm. ex vat 
inc. VAT = £25.13 




TOO 


fag .00 

■ml WkW iK.VAT 
inc. VAT = £44.05 




10 


mmmv m.vat 
inc. VAT - £6,79 




50 


£25 -* 

MmmmmJ ex. vat 
inc. VAT = £29,79 


100 


FA A. 95 

inc. VAT = £51.69 




10 


£fi-S5 

mm^m ex vat 
inc, VAT - £7,99 


50 


inc. VAT = £35.59 


100 


£57-^ 

■MV# EX. VAT 

inc. VAT = £66.59 



Q 
IT 
O 



a 
I 
1 
I 



8 

£ 
3 
<j 

UJ 

(/J 

ec 
O 



>- 



EL 

B 

LU 



r 

I 






m 



s 



W and aet them right! *-*■ 



The program listings In PAGF-6 are prepared carefully <o 
ensure that ihey can be typed In as easily as possible. Before 
typing a n y I Iwtl ngs ensure ( h »t you are la ml I iar wll h t h e use 
of the Shift and CONTROL and INVERSE, keys as outlined 
In your computer manual. The listings are prepared lo 
match exactly what you see on screen. Every character that 
you may see In a listing is included In the chart below for 
cross reference. By using TYPO 3 you can ensure that you 
type In the programs EXACTLY as they are printed. Remem- 
ber a single typing mistake may mean a program will not 



WHAT ARE THOSE CODES? 

Each line of a program begins with a special two letter 
code THESE SHOULD NOT BF- TYPED IN. They are used 
W the program TYPO to check that you have typed each 
line correctly. IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY TYPED IN 
THE TYPO 3 LISTING PLEASE DO SO NOW. The program 
can be used as you type in each 1 ine of a program or to check 
an already typed program. The code for each line will match 

but if you have problems check the listing conventions 
below carefully, you are most probably typing a CONTROL 
character incorrectly. TYPO 3 cannot check if a line has 
been missed so ll you have problems in running a listing 
count the lines in the program and ensure none are missing. 
II the TYPO codes m ate h and the progra m still do es n ot run. 
LIST It to cassette or disk using LIST "C:" or LIST 
"T* filename", switch off the computer, re-boot and then 
ENTER the program using ENTER "O" OT ENTER 
"D; filename 1 '- Save this vetsion in the normal way. 

HOW TO USE TYPO 3 

1. Type in the listing carefully for although you can use 
TYPO 3 to check itself ( see b below) it may not work if you 
have made mistakes. 

2. SAVE or CSAVE a copy of the program 

3. Each time you want to type in a program listing RUN 
TYPO 3 first The program will install a machine code 
routine In memory and then delete itself- Now tVP e in a ,lne 
as shown in the magazine excJucfjng the first two tetter code and 
press RETURN. 

4. A two letter code will appear at the top left of your screen. 
If this code matches the one in the magazine carry on and 
type the ne*t line. Note, the code will not match if you use 
abbreviations- If you prefer to use abbreviations LIST the 
line you have just typed, move the cursor to that line and 
press RETURN. The code should now match. 



h If the code does not match, use the editing keys to correct 

the line and press RETURN again. Repeat If necessary until 

the codes match. 

6 To check a line you have already typed LIST the line, 

place the cutsot on that line and press RETURN. 

7. When you have flnisht-d a listing Just SAVE or CSAVE It 

in the normal way. 

Youcantyp* In a program without using TYPO 3 and then 
check It hy SAVf.ing or CSAVEing a copy of the program, 
running TYPO 3 and then l.OADIng or CLOADIng your 
program and proceeding as In step 6 above. 

Always SAVE or CSAVE a program before running It and 
always use TYPO before telling us ihat a program will not 



run. 



EI 

rtl 



1 HEM 

i DEH 



■•.ft 3 HEM 



EL 4 REM 
56 199 G 
Mb 118 F 

POKE 
CG 12* I 
StU 
vm Lie A 

.ji i «e 

Ml H 
MS !»»» 

hi. jeie 

OB teiB 

DK 1839 

m< turn 

in ioso 

KC 1«r:H 
EU 1B7B 

bk iobo 
kk ia?a 

Zfl 1166 
LC III* 
JH 1120 

tu me 

TH Jl*8 

HF Hie 
RV nee 

65 
TM 1179 

181 
AH 1LU' 

3 

mm n?e 

1288 

L'lB 

to iaaa 

TH A23B 
\* 1249 

162 
Cfl 1259 
KM 1268 
MB 1270 

1* J 

1288 

J 
MV 12*A 

[to uon 



.I N Mim HH Wm» ■ ■ ■■*«« » « 

» TYPO III BW «l»i Bt>n*.on 

m June itbi ■ 

r a pmefreidtr for AMTIC *nd » 
m PMfl 6 bJ-.'U a" rrPQ II ** 

H F ubliU,rd by ANTIC ■i!i«i' lf " 

PftPPll.--. 8 

Qft 1 = 1536 TO l-*91:»f&" ■!C«=CK*»1 

i.mKfui I 

F CKOI87M TttEH T '-Error in DATA 

rnt-nl'. - ChetV Typin9"SE"0 

■ i\:n tlSJfrJ 

m| V pq i t i is up and runfung'"- 






HR 
GF 



UftTft 1*4, ltB.t. 105. 56,3. 101,6* 

N 7i 2»(,e.jee.?i)ii.28e. 1*2,3 6.2*8 

DATA ?*2 ,»*, Z00.16*. 79, 151,26, 3 

DfiTA ?>t,lSJ.*,15J.!"'^,l«!,t 

DATA 199 .8,228.157,7?.*. 232, 724 

cm i fi is,;it,i*s. i6», 9 J . 1*1 , B J . * 

COTO 16», 6. 1*1, 04, 6,173,4.228 
6 AT A IBS, 8. 14 1,t5.6. I 7 I, 5.726 
&ATA 1H5,B,14», 96,6,1*9,8, 1*2 
Dfiro 3, 14*. 283, 2*2, 16. S&1.96. B 

DAT a a,e,8,B p ft r o.8,* 
data a , o . e, b..b , « . u . f* 

pcTA 6,*, 72, 201 . 155, 24B.S6 . ?3H 

DATA 293, 133.2*9, 130,72, 16-*,B, 1" 

&B.TA 206. 1*2, 8, 1ft, 38. 20ft, fi ,28' 

DATA 1*4,7,24,101, 283, 144.2,239 

OftTft 100. 2 B2 , 200, 2 3 9, 113,217,24,1 

DATA 29*". 181,297, 133.2*4,165,265, 

&ATA 206, 113,205, 1*5,206, 1*5.8. I J 

DATA 206, 104, 179, 104, 49, 96, 139. 72 

fr&Tfl 152.72,16 2. a, 134. 28 7,134. 7 Bfl 

DATA 168 . 74 , e> . 2 04 , J«, 285. I*, 2 86 

DATA 31,207.39,280,56,165, 2 B7, 233 

DATA IB*, 179. 1*5, 299. ZI3, 2. I**,* 

DATA 134, 267, 13 3, 200, 13* ,280.227. 

DATA 9, 165, 29?, 113, 294, 165.7*8,6 
DATA 284, 42, 281. ?B, 144.4, 2JJ , 76 
[>DTft 230,284,262,20*, 24 2. i 33,295. 



128, 14«, 86, 29*, 192, 4*. 286,24 







v-a-ci it - Issue *2 




y 


'■ 


(M 


m 




f* 


-,\ 



TRANSDISK IV 

Commercial tapes CAN be 
transferred to disk!* 

READ ON! 




/ 


'■■ 


i* 


*:i 




/^ 


\N 



Are you tired ol waning for cassette games to loacP Would you like to 
trarisler lhern to disk for faster, more reliable and convenient loading 7 
Vou may have heard or read that this is not pQ$$j&I&. Well, not only is 
h possible, but there is a program, Transdisk IV, thai will do it all aulo- 
matrcally. you require no knowledge of cassette protection lachruquesl 
To put i t $i mply , Trg n sdisk tv wi II road A NY Ala ri cassa tte , (si na, le. multi- 
stage r non-slandard lorimat. 64 K - no problem I), remove the protection, 
tn en p lace n o n to d isk 'or yc u , P lus , to load arvd run t he new disk version 
of a cassette program requires just one keypress from a convenient, 
autorun menu disk. 

The cost of this, the most powerful tape to disk utility for the Atari is [ust. 
£24.95 inclusive of first class delivery. Also comes complete with com- 
prehensive in si ructions which were sp&cially written with the cassette 
upgrader and first lime disk user in mind. 

Requires: Atari 8QQXL or t30XE Computer wish disk drive and cassstta 
rsCQfd$f. 

R&metnber. that not only win you save money on upgrades to disk 
(if they are available) but many games are only available on cas- 
sette anyway so Transdisk IV has to be a worthwhile inva&tmantf 

Send an SAE or phone (or more details of this ulility. 

Make Cheque or P.O.. payable to DIGICOMM and send your order to> 

DIGICGMM 

170 Brad we II Common Boulevard, Milton Keynes, BUCKS MK1 3 BBG. 

Tel (0906) 6G3708. 

Demonstrations arranged for callers by appointment 

"For your convenience from ;he original cassette only. 




tPWiLLEM WWn TOM MflBBD f 

FOR FAST RELIABLE AND PROFESSIONAL 

REPAIRS AT COMFFTmVE PRICES 

P M ENGINEERING 



EH1 



UNtT B, NEW ROAD, ST. IVES, 
CAMBRIDGESHIRE. PE17-4BG 




H^ 1 



^MH|T* 



RAMBIT PPP - PARALLEL PRINTER PORT 

A neatseHconlaned interface module Iftal drives pcnlers- wdh -slandard Ontieflica 
36-way connector o» 'or other par ai tat commun»ta1>on SimpUy plugs i nto (he parali hi 
bus pari, can Support all Aid m prim 'unciiuns |t?9 SSI 
S».iprr h ^riiui> *i^pns co'^siderarjiy your c h -oite ot printer Please sifli? mode - ' 

TASKMASTER - TAPE TO DISK UTILITY 

A*ulo-conTOrt j&ur tapes t-o tnenu dis* *im Au1o-iun Nom single kfiy ielteiusn THE 
powerful ulility lar hath new nnri p-xpm ifl'-iced drive owngrg. mr.lutffl 1 ? 35.-5*3 Titjlgr. pclil^r 
mri TiDnii|Dr1uncikon& lor m-daplh ftork twyend tne needs- or nwmal converairon |t9). 
£■:: -i iljardb! & with tape-disk uti iluw cP^Nng much TKjre 

RAMBIT II - HIGH SPEED CASSETTE 

A DdaK«ri« interlace lhaE allows you tc n^f-record yoyr 1ap**5 !■::■ I::.;liI ;lI ;ir:*nriri T-A'% 

TIMES FASTER. Comprises an easy to Tit kit and lape program '&\i\ Please s,la1e 
Cassette model or Fitietf and lesled M2T. ail Inclusive, iusl pest your ctaia reorder ir: 



Bolh utilities have lull instructions, handle Single. Muiti-slage. Longj-PiocK ete up to *fl*f 
Hi iirnsuimplrjlnr Hk &WXL -BOQXL. S5XE ant) 130XE W« h*lp. answer queries and 
update software. Quored prtcw if* inclusive. Send SAE lor details or P 0., 'Cheque 
payable 1o 

RAMBIT 

1ft, The Oreen, Thurlby, Bourrw, Line*. PClO OHB 



LET US PUT 
YOU IN... 



•jni:i 



YOU'LL WANT TO WRITE HOME 
ABOUT OUR NEW LOWER 
PRICES AND NEARLY 
PZPRLCE INTERFACES 

Atari 5MMB04 



Atari 8 Bit Systems 



80 Column-Dot Matrix 
80CPS 

tion/Tractor Fer 
1 2 Months Warranty 
Almost HALF PRICE 
Interface O* 
ONLY 



EX. VAT 
inc. VAT = £184.00 



+ }:Hh) ; )!4>Ml!>h) 



This Primer ftQOtmS the 

GRAPHICS AT INTERFACE 

to connect to 

Atttr S Bit Systems 




80 Column -Dot Matrix 
1 20 C PS Draft Mode 
24CPS NlQ Mode 
Friction/Tractor Feeds 
1 2 Months Warranty 
Almost HALF PRICE 
Interface Offer! 

ONLY 



.00 



iS 



EX. VAT 
inc. VAT - £1 78.25 



80 Column- Dot Matrix 
■» 1 65 CPS Draft Mode 

35CPS NLQ Mode 
^Friction/Tractor Feeds 
• Full 2 Year Warranty 

Almost HALF PRICE 

Interface Offer! 



ONLY . . . 

£1/9 EX. VAT 

irt.* VAT = Pint. RR 



This Printer requires the 

GRAPHICS A T INTERFACE 

to connect to 

Atari E Bit System* 

mUOOn^ i nc . VAT = £205.85 

MpC Rihbons available 



1° 

i' - 
rarr 

lijQ- 



'|IVB 



inc. VAT *• £14.95 




&& 



13 



i 



IUBILEE DRIVE LOUGHBOROUGH 

LEiCS - LE11 OXS 
Tel. 0509 610444 (5 lines) 
(Prion- A Dtttory Subject to Availability E. & O.E.) 



% 

k- 

2 
S 







LU 






U 




in 


> 




LU 


cc 




LU 


UJ 




\- 


10 




Z 
< 


a. 

3 




< 


^ 




3 


O 




(7 


< 


> 




m 


fT 


LU 




UJ 


—I 


cc 


> 


at 
< 


O 


_J 


I- 


EC 


LU 


*T 


LU 


a 


LU 


O- 


LU 


CO 


D 


111 


<± 


W) 


DC 

a 





S 





Pape d- Kim; !2 



MORE FLIGHT 

SIMULATOR 

BOOKS 







ftfttl 

SIM 



■-■•. ~ 

At last! Compute! 's latest Flight 
Simulator titles have arrived in the UK. 
Learning To Fly with Flight Simulator 
is for those who have just bought their 
copy of FS3, whilst experienced pilots 
will enjoy Flying On Instruments. 
Those who would just like more fun can 
read Flight Simulator Adventures for 
the ST. 

On a different tack Jet Fighter School 
is a unique book looking at aspects of 
combat Hying with programs like F-15 
Strike Eagle. Check them out now! 



WATCH OUT FOR 

ZEPPELINS 




More good news for Atari 8-bit owners 
is the formation of a new games company 
up in Newcastle-upon-Tyne called 
Zeppelin Games- The company has as 
one of its directors, Brian Jobting, an 
established and well respected Atari 
programmer and the company fully 
expect to support the Atari 3- bit as much 
as possible, 

Managing Director is Derek Brewster, 



a former journalist with CRASH 
magazine and an experienced Spectrum 
and Amstrad programmer. The company 
will have a full in-house team of 
programmers and intend to put out 
quality programs on cassette at just £2.99. 
Obviously they intend to produce games 
over the whole range of 8-bit computers 
but one of the company's first releases is 
for the Atari, Look out for Speed Ace 
which is an excellent motorcycle race 
game played either against nineteen 
computer controlled riders or as a two 
player game on some of the world's most 
famous racing circuits. 

The preview copy of Speed Ace 
received by PAGE 6 looks well worth the 
£2,99 price and we hope to see more 
Atari titles from Zeppelin as they become 
established- It is a brave step nowadays to 
make an Atari version one of your first 
releases and we hope that you support 
Zeppelin so that they in turn can let us 
have more and more Atari titles. 






KEEP IT ALL 
TIDY 



Have you ever looked at the mess 
underneath your computer desk? Most 
likely you have fallen over all those wires 
many times and have run out of sockets 
around the house! Help is at hand from 
Cambrian Distributors, a new marketing 
arm of Elkay Electrical Ltd, a leading 
British manufacturer of electrical 
connectors. Of interest to computer 
owners are the Multiplug range of power 
connectors and a TV aerial switch that 
allows three different inputs to one TV. 

The standard Multiplug range includes 
units which allow two, four or six 
appliances to be connected to one 13 amp 
socket and is ideal for your Atari and all 
rhe peripherals attached to it, The units 
are available either fused or non fused and 
prices start at £10.99. 

If you use your computer heavily for 
business or serious work, or are worried 
about losing some long programs under 
development due to fluctuations in the 
mains, a Smoothflow Multiplug might be 
the answer. This gives four filtered outlets 




from a single 1 3 amp socket and protects 
equipment against mains spikes and 
surges as well as eliminating mains 
interference on the sound channels of 
Hi-Fi and Video units. Prices for this 
range start at £21.99. 

Perhaps of more interest to the majority 
of Atari owners who have to share a TV 
for their computer is the 3-2-1 aerial 
switch For just £4.99 you can connect up 
to three input devices to your TV and 
choose between them at the flick of a 



switch You can therefore connect up 
your Atari, TV Aerial and Video and 
need never again fumble about behind the 
TV to change the connections. You could 
also, if you wished reverse the unit and 
demonstrate your favourite computet 
game on up to three TV's! 

Further details of these products can be 
obtained from Cambrian Distributors, 
Newtown, Powys SY16 4LF who also sell 
by mail order. The telephone number is 
0686 24508. 



it Page 6 - Issue M 



. 



The phenomenal growth in demand 
for Atari computers means a much 
bigger home for the BIG show . . , 



mat 



Alexandra Palace 




Wood 
Green 



now 



London 
N22 

Organised by 

Database 

k Exhibitions 






THREE action-packed 
da ys for Atari owners! 



The spectacular Alexandra Palace 
represents a new showcase for the 
fastest -growing range of computers 
on the market. 

From the exciting games console to 
the ever-popular 8-bit Atari and the 
sensational Mega ST, they'll all be 
there at the Atari User Show! 

Some of the very latest software 
will be on show for the first time. 




9HBMP 



And that means you can enjoy unique 
hands-on experience of programs 
everyone will soon be talking about. 

You'll find some of the best prices 
around for blank discs, disc boxes and 
other accessories, learn about the many 
opportunities to expand your computer 
system, get helpful advice from some of 
Britain's leading experts, and so much 
more! 



How to get there 



It 'i 10 easy to get to the show - 
by car, rail, underground or QIU- 
Alexancfra Pa I a re ha* ill own 
British Rail station, whisking 
visitors to and from Kinq i C ran 
in Just nine mlnutli. And thi-n- v 
a fr«* but service shuttling 
httwnn station and Show every 
10 minute j. If your* travelling 
by road the show fs on fy 1 5 
minutes away from junction 25 
on the M25 - and 1 all car parhlnq 
Is free. 



Cut the queues and 
save £1 per head - 
with this advance 
ticket order 



Your advance ticket order 



<■ iuppty. 

□ Adult ticitefc at EZ i save E I J . .. E. - . 

fOidei tout Mtuli tickets, get the- fifth FftEE<) 

G Under-I6& tickets at £1 |&aveEi| £ 

(Order tout under- 1 6s tickets, get trie fifth FREE'} 



The West Hall 

Alexandra Palace, Alexandra Park 
Wgpd Green, London N22 
April 22-24, 19fl8 




Post to: Atari Uicr Show Tt<k*tf r 
Europe Ham*, Arlington P#rk r 
Adttnqton, Mac*l*ltt*td SHiO SUP. 



Tout L. 



I enclose d cheque made payable Id 
Database Exhibitions 



Please debit my 

Ar i i-A,V s,* >: .nn: I r it > 



Name 

Address 

Postcode 



Signed 







J 



Attmiislon *t door: 
£3 (JnUiittf, 
tt [under tisf 





Advance ticket orders 
must be received by 
Wednesday. April 13. 



PHONE ORDERS: Ring Show Hotline: Oh ZS 079920 
PRESTEL ORDERS; KEY 'St. THEN 614560383 
MICRDLINK ORDERS,- MAJLBOX T2:MAG4HH 

■ ■ : Quote credit curd number ,fnd full .-n litres h 



68(231 a 



Renders Write | 




:i 



HEAVENS ABOVE 

Dear Sir, 

I read the letter in the 
Readers Write, issue 3 1 , 
relating to a user complaining 
about not enough astronomy 
programs for Atari computers 
There sire a few programs 
available including: 

Astronomy 1 from 
Computer Ditect, 22292 N. 

Pepper Road, Barrington, IL 

GQO10, U.S.A. for the price of 

$5.95 plus postage. 

Atari Planetarium (really 

great!) from Computer Palace, 

3478 Hiway 101 HE., Lincoln 

City, OR 97367 for the price of Bob LussieT 

$36 .90 plus postage. This one Burnaby , B 

has a 1 1 5 page instruction 

book. The program charts out 

1200 stars, 88 constellations, 

Solar System, Halley's Comet 

and more than 300 Deep Sky 



objects Highly recommended. 

Computer Astronomy 
Network, 20 Helen St ., 
Warren, NJ 07060, U.S.A. is a 
club for people interested in 
astronomy on computers. 
There is a newsletter which 
relates to various computers 
Write for more information to 
Barry Malpas at the above 
address. I am a member of this 
group. 

I hope that Miss Lancaster 
will benefit from this 
information and will be able to 
find a use for her Atari in 
astronomy. 



Canada 



Write to: 

PAGE 6, 
P.O. Box 54, 
STAFFORD 

ST16 1DR 



Many thanks for the 
information. Atari Planetarium 
is also available from Software 
Express in Birmingham and we 
have also heard from a company 
called Sirius Optics {070% 
872649} who inform us that a 
series of programs are planned 
for the ST and are due far 
release towards the end of 
March. 



IF YOU CAN'T AFFORD IT, STEAL IT 



Dear Sir, Madam(?)> 

We are confessed software 
pirates- not actually selling 
software but illegally copying 
it for our own use. The 
question we ask is this - how 
can beginners build up a 
software library, legally, at £10 
for a decent game and £20+ 
for utilities business software? 

This was exactly our 
situation six years ago. We 
now have a library of over 400 
games all obtained illegally. If 
we had gone by the book it 
would have cost us 
approximately £4000 
(accounting for budget games 
and business programs). 

It would not surprise us if 
this letter did not appear in 
your magazine (we still think 
your magazine is the best to 
date). 

The Vienna Pirates 



DOS DILEMMA 

Pear PAGE 6, 

] have recently bought a 
copy of 'Turbo-Basic' which is 
DOS 2,5 compatible and I 
would recommend that all 
Basic programmers should 
consider purchasing this 
software- 

My problem is that all my 
Basic programs are in DOS 3 
format and I would rather 
convert them with some other 
method than using the cassette 
recorder. DOS 3 has a utility 
for converting DOS 2 files, is 
there a utility available for 
converting DOS 3 files to 
DOS 2.5? Any information 
you give me would be 
gratefully accepted - 

A, P. Gosney 
Rainham, Kent, 

The full version of DOS 2.5 has 

a utility called COPY32.COM 
which mil do exactly what you 
want. A copy is available from 
the PAGE 6 Accessory Shop on 
library Dish #36 - The KL'XE 
Kit for £3,95 and the disk 



contains several other useful 
utilities. We also published a 
program called ACCESS III 
back in Issue 14 but 
unfortunately this is now out of 
print. 



The old controversy raises its 
head once more . You should 
know our views by now and 
unfortunately there is not 
enough space to repeal all the 
arguments. What I don't 
understand is why anyone 
actually needs 400 games, you 
can't play that many surely?. 
You are not 'collectors' in the 
genuine sense of the word, how 
many people collect photocopies 
of stamps? You obviously don't 
care about smalt companies 
going out of business or about the 
long term support of Atari by 
the software houses. Why not 
just read the reviews, try and get 
a look at games in the shops and 
buy what you can afford? If you 
can't afford that many games 
thenyoujust have to accept it. 
Or do you steal other things you 
can't afford as well? 



^-D ANIMATOR 
PROBLEMS 

Dear PAGE 6, 

Is there an error in the 3-D 
Animator listing in issue 30, 
November 1987? I have typed 
it in using 'TYPO II I s and 
saved it with filenames as 
stated, everything works until 
I select 3 from the menu to 
animate the drawing. It starts 
to load the program then 
crashes with 'error 147 at line 
5060'. 

I am running the program 
on a 130Xhand I have 
followed the instructions to the 
letter, 

Paul Thomas 
Rednal, Birmingham 

If you look at page 62 of issue 



TREE TRACING 
ENIGMA 

Dear PAGE 6, 

As an ardent Genealogist, I 
have just read, with great 
interest, the article in issue 30 
by William A Benbow. 
Unfortunately, as a beginner 
with the Atari I have one or 
two questions which I hope 
you can answer. I use an 
800XL, a 1050 Disk Drive and 
a 1029 printer and my 
questions are as follows. Can 
the program 'Family History' 
be used on my computer? Is it 
available in the U.K. or must I 
apply to California for it? 

[ find your magazine very 
interesting, issue 30 being the 
second one 1 have read - hence 
the enclosed subscription. 
Keep up the good work. 

Ron Bidwell 
Ltttleport, Cambs. 

There shouldn't be any problems 



in n$ing Family History on your 
system although , if the program 
uses graphics dumps it will not 
support the 1 029. Printed 
output is likely, however, to be 
straight text so you should have 
no problem. The program is not, 
to our knowledge, available in 
this country so you will need to 
order direct from Direct Lines 
Software. The easiest way is to 
obtain an Internationa! Money 
Order from any branch of 
Barclays Bank for the price of 
$39.95 plus S10 or so for 
postage. You are unlikely to 
have any problems as Direct 
Lines Software is a small 
company run by an enthusiast 
but it might be wise to write first 
with a couple of Internationa! 
Keplv Coupons to check the 
current price and postage. Most 
small companies in the States 
are quite helpful and are quite 
happy to ship overseas but make 
sure that they ship Air Mail or 
you mil be in for a long wait.' 






10 



Page 6 - Issue J2 



_ 



30, under the heading ' Two 
Simple Rules For Animation' ', 
and read rule two carefully, you 
may discover thai you have not 
fallowed the instructions to the 
tetter. You have probably 
designed an animated sequence 
that is more than 22,000 
characters in length which thus 
breaks memory limitations and 
then throws your error 147 
because the computer does not 
have enough memory to set up a 
GRAPHICS S screen. 



RAW DEAL FOR 
NEW OWNERS 

Dear Sir, 

I-s. anyone out there as 
confused as I am at the current 
bundling of a cassette recorder 
with the 130XE and 65XE? I, 
and many other readers I 
should think, bought my 
80OXL, complete with disk 
drive for £120 two years ago 
and have been very pleased 
with it, I added a 1029 printer, 



for £105, and can do good 
graphics dumps and list 
programs (I even send letters 
to understanding friends on it). 
A nice little system for £225. 

But what about new owners? 
How will they upgrade to a 
disk drive at this stage of the 
game? KBU's are disappearing, 
to be replaced (promises, 
promises) by a double sided 
drive at £ I HO, or so the 
rumours go, but surely that's 
much too expensive for a disk 
drive by current standards. If 
we wanted proof that it's the 
end of the line for our S-bits, 
then this must be itl 

Also could anyone out there 
make a little box for about 
£50-100 which will allow us to 
connect the new cheap 
megabyte drives to our 
machines? Without them we'll 
be forced into using ST*s or 
Arnigas- 

I think 1*11 phone the 
Samaritans! 

Richard Martin 
Acton, London 



MONITOR MAYHEM 

Dear Sir, 

1 am considering purchasing 
an Atari ST for business/home 
use 3 but lam rather confused 
about which monitor to buy, if 
any. I could use my portable 
colour television to begin with. 
What will the quality of the 
graphics and text that are 
produced be like> and how 
good will this be in comparison 
to the Atari medium resolution 
monitor colour monitor? 

On the other hand, I could 
just about afford to buy a high 
resolution monochrome 
monitor. Will the text and 
graphics be significantly 
better? As I have access to a 
printer, I intend to do some 
word-process ing/ spreadsheet 
work and do not want my eyes 
to suffer as they have done 
whilst using an Amstrad 
PC1512inwork, 

I.J. Ackery 
Downend, Bristol 



If you want to do word 
processing on the S Tyou are 
unlikely to be satisfied with a 
TV which will not give sufficient 
definition in Medium- Res used 
by most word processors. An 
A tori mono monitor gives a 
sharper, dearer screen than 
almost all of its competitors due 
to its 70Hz refresh rate. If you 
do serious word processing or use 
spread sheets, 1 would not 
hesitate to recommend an Atari 
mono monitor. If you need 
colour then a monitor mast be 
considered essential for this type 
of work. Atari's own colour 
monitor or a Philips 8833 would 
be ideal. I can assure you, either 
way? the ST display will knock 
spots off the Amstrad! 



H 



rMtfC fa 
*t-i fa if*. 



l*BaHJ«H)W!HB^Ul^i.i\» : ift 



ms 



ARE REVIEWERS 
PERFECT? 

Dear PAGE o, 

I have been a subscriber to 
your magazine for 
approximately two and a half 
years and have found it to be 
informative and entertaining - 
especially the reviews, 
However, it is with one of the 
reviews that 1 must take 
exception. 

Following an extremely 
favourable review of 
Mini-Office II , both by 
yourselves and an 
Atari-dedicated competitor, I 
acquired the software. I was 
particularly impressed by the 
claims made for *'a very 
flexible mail-merge facility" 
and "an incredibly well 
integrated program". 
Unfortunately, as these were 
the only aspects of the software 
that I needed, 1 have not found 
these claims to be 
substantiated. The mail-merge 
program contains a serious 
bug, already admitted by 



Database Software, that almost 
renders it useless. I refer to a 
spurious character that is 
printed in the 21st space of 
every field in the database, 
provided that the 20th space is 
filled by a character other than 
a blank, when used with either 
mail-merge or the label 
printing facility. 

Furthermore, whilst the 
mail-merge facility allows 
database fields to be hutted 
together, the label facility 
automatically interposes two 
spaces between fields. So much 
for integration! 

I should be interested to 
know the extent of testing that 
is undertaken by reviewers of 
non-game software prior to 
eulogising the product. Having 
received a second copy of the 
program direct from Database 
Software, it took me Jess than 
half an hour to establish that it 
produced the same error and 
lo run A full check on every 
space in all the fields of the 



database to determine the 
frequency of the error. 
Unfortunately, it took a 
number of hours to work my 

way around to an acceptable 
solution to these and other 
problems relating to printer 
paging that I will not go into 
now. 

Despite the foregoing 
criticisms of the program and 
the reviewer, I have no 
hesitation in recommending 
the word-processing 
component as simple to use 
and functional. 

Nicholas]. Recce 
London E1R 

As you will no doubt appreciate, 
reviewing software is a very 
difficult task, especially if the 
programs main functions are 
designed for commercial use. 
Sometimes the reviewer may 
have had the software for only 
two Or three days and hejske 
cannot be expected to find every 



bug in the program fs) . 
Wherever it is practical, 

extensive testitig is curried out on 
all pieces of software, but time is 
limited and the reviewer must 
estimate how long it will take to 
assess the software and how long 
it will take to do the write up. 
These issues aside, the reader 
must also bear in mind, that a 
review is not only a test of the 
software's performance but it is 
also one man's opinion. There is 
also the matter that if the 
producer of a software package 
cannot find a bug in what is 
normally extensive pre-release 
testing how can a reviewer be 
expected to find ail the bugs? In 
the particular case of Mint 
Office II the reviewer had 
purchased the software himself 
and was obviously quite happy 
with it. He had not discovered 
the bug you mention, and might 
never da so. His opinion will 
probably remain the same 
because the program does 
everything he needs. , 



l*ajft 6 - Issue H 




THE QUESTION MARK AFFAIR 

Allan Palmer investigates 
and solves a mystery 



In the Letters page of issue 30 of PAGE 6 3 a method of 
getting rid of the question mark prompt when using ihe 
INPUT statement in Atari BASIC was given. The example 



was: 



10 DIM ASCI") 

20 ? "ENTER SOMETHING ";:1NPUT #16,A» 

30? AS 

Although ihis solution works, the Editor staled "don't ask me 
why!". Well, I believe that I have traced down the cause of this 
undocumented feature (or is it a bug?) in good old Atari 
BASIC. So, if you bear with me, I will explain ihe some of the 
inner workings of the Atari. 

OPEN CHANNEL ZERO 

First of all, let us take a look at the format of the INPUT 
statement. The command may appear as., e.g. INPUT 
NAMES, or INPUT ^RECORDS. The #2 (or #16) is a 
channel number identifying the device from which the input is 
to be taken Where the channel number is absent, #0 is assumed 
which is the screen editor. The channel n Jmber points to one of 
the Atari's eight Input Output Control Blocks (lOCBs). At this 
point, you mav say if there are only eight channels or lOCBs, 
which channel does an INPUT #16 statement use? From the 
faci that the example quoted at the top of this article works, it 
appears that channel 16 is treated as channel 0. 

A BASIC ERROR? 

At this point I thought that all that was happening was that 
any channel number greater than 7 (the eight IOCBs are 
numbered to 7) was being treated as 0, I then tried the 
example with INPUT #10 in place of INPUT #16. The result 
was Error 20, which when looked up in the back of Your Atari 
Computer is. explained as "Bad Channel Number - The 
program tried to use channel or a channel number larger than 
7". Confusion reigned - 10 is larger than 7 and fails, but 16 
works! Some further experimentation showed that channel 
number 32 works, but using channel 17, error 131 appears ("A 
GET or INPUT statement used a channel opened for output 
only"). 

AN INSIGHT TO THE PROBLEM 

At this point, I started looking through my collection of 
Atari-related books and magazine articles. The obvious place to 
find the kev to this obscure mystery seemed to be one of Bill 
Wilkinson's Insight: Atari' articles in COMPUTE! magazine. 
After some delving I found the clue I needed in Bills articles in 



the November 1981 and January 19&5 issues. Both columns 
describe the use of IOCBs, particularly as used from assembly 
language. Bill explained that when undertaking input output in 
assemble language via CIO, the program should specify which 
channel to use by passing the relevant lOCB number times 16 in 
the X-register. Each IOCB is 16 bytes long, so the X -register 
value is used as an offset to the start of the whole IOCB area. 

HOW MUCH CAN YOU PUT IN A BYTE? 

Things began to fall in place now. When an INPUT 
command specifics channel n, the Atari operating system is 
actually using 16 times n. So, channel is 0, but channel I is 16, 
channel 2 is 32 ... channel 10 is 160 ... channel 16 is 256, 
channel 17 is 272, etc. However, an eight-bit computer like the 
Atari stores values in bytes of memory where each byte consists 
of eight bits - the maximum value in one byte is 255, thus any 
value greater than 255 must occupy two bytes. I now turned to 
COMPUTE! Books' Atari BASIC Source Book compiled by 
Hill Wilkinson (who else?} and began to peruse the listing of the 
original source code for Atari BASIC included in thai 
publication. 

MULTIPLICATION IS 
THE NAME OF THE GAME 

After studying the source code for a while I managed to 
identify what was happening. There are in fact two areas to 
consider. Firstly, when processing an INPUT command, 
BASIC only prints a '?' prompt if the channel number supplied 
is (zero). Thus for channels 1 to 7 (corresponding to the 
remaining IOCBs), no '?' is printed when an INPUT command 
is processed. Secondly, the input channel number is multiplied 
by 16 to be passed to the CIO system io specify ihe relevant 
JOCB, Logically, the channel number is not expected to be 
greater than 7. Unfortunately, BASIC uses a one-byte field to 
pass the channel number times 16 to the CIO system to initiate 
an INPUT command. However, this field is validated to see if it 
is not greater than 7 times 16 by checking if the field is negative 
by using a BMI instruction. In an eight-bit byte, the setting of 
the most significant (left-most} bit indicates a negative value- 
Take a look at the binary equivalents in Table 1 

In the right hand portion of the Binary equivalent column, 
values equivalent to channels & to I "5 inclusive have their 
negative bit set and result in an Error 20 from BASIC Channel 
16 results in a binary equivalent setting the least significant bit 
in the left hand portion only, the right hand portion remains 
equivalent CO zero. Consequently, BASIC can be fooled if a 
channel number which is a multiple of 16 is supplied in the 
INPUT statement because the byte being tested remains zero 



i: 



Page *> - Issu* 3-2 




Channel 


Channel x 16 


Binary 


equivalent 








oooooooo 


OOOOOOOO 


1 


16 


oooooooo 


O0O10OO0 


2 


32 


oooooooo 


O01000O0 


3 


48 


oooooooo 


00110000 


4 


64 


oooooooo 


oioooooo 


5 


80 


oooooooo 


O101OOOO 


o 


96 


oooooooo 


01100000 


7 


112 


oooooooo 


01110000 


8 


12S 


oooooooo 


10000000 


IS 


240 


oooooooo 


11110OO0 


16 


256 


oooooooi 


OOOOOOOO 


17 


272 


00000001 


00010000 


32 


512 


00000010 


oooooooo 



THE QUESTION ANSWERED 

Referring back to the original example then, because the 
channel number specified in the INPUT command is a multiple 
of 16, it is acceptable as a valid parameter because it in turn is 
multiplied by 16 and the least significant byte remains at taitu 
indicating channel (the screen editor). However, because the 
value in the channel actually specified in the INPUT command 
is not zero, the '?' prompt does not appear. 

Hopefully, this convoluted investigation will explain why 
there is a way to get rid of the *?* prompt when using the 
INPUT command and the screen editor. 

My thanks must go ti> Bill Wilkinson for all the bits of 
itlfGnrmcinn and insight (no pun intended; that he has provided 
to Atari enthusiasts over the years, Without the background 
data that he has published I am sure our understanding of the 
Atari would not be a? great as it today. * 



HAVE YOU RUNG FOR 

THE PAGE 6 

CATALOG YET? 

DO IT NOW 

0785 57005 

(24 hour answerphonc) 



DISK BONUS 



MASTER OF THE 
MINDFIRE 

by Duncan Stuart 

A 100% machine code arcade 

game available only as a Bonus 

on this issue's disk 



This issue we are proud to present, as a bonus on Side 2 of the 
Issue 32 disk, a superb machine code arcade game originally 
written for commercial release by Duncan Stuart, author of 
Red Rat*s recent blockbuster Nightmares, It ts a challenging 
and difficult game that will test your skills to the limit. We 
haven't managed to get past level 3 without cheating! Con you 
do better? 

THE GAME 

The game is a 1 player arcade game played with a joystick in 
part 1 ■ You control a doughty young wizard sent to a country 
mansion to expel the evil forces gathering there. You have been 
chosen from your sect of grey wizards to combat the evil since 
you alone control the 'Mlndrire' - a living creature of magical 
powers. You cam use it to effect by shooting small bolts of the 
fire from your staff. The MlndMre also endows you with a 
number of spells you can use to your advantage in the different 
levels of the game. 

In the first level you must find the hey to escape each room 
while being harassed by ghosts. It could tie un the ground floor 
or on the gallery which you can reach by pushing the joystick up 
to activate the levitation spell. When you have found a key exit 
the room bottom left* 

In the second level you can shoot the suits of armour but 
mutt avoid the spears by pulling down on the joystick to use the 
shrinking spell. You will stay shrunken for only a few seconds or 
until you press the joystick button, 

In level three you have passed through the mansion to an 
underground cavern. You can cross the crevasse by touching a 
stalactite and pressing the joystick button to use the sky-honk 
spell. To get upwards you must climb the stalagmites. 

Next you will shape change into a bird in order to sort out the 
pterodactyls that have made the caves of level four into their 
home. You must shoot them in the body and not the wings to 
cause them to fall and smash a hole through the bottom of the 
cave. When you have made a large enough hole, you can go 
down through it and take on the lava monster to discover the 
exit to the cave. 

Finally you must continually shoot the flying creature in level 
five to complete the game, after which you will return to level 
one to discover if you are strong enough to try again! 

When you have lost a life or finished a level you must press 
the joystick button to continue. The START button will begin 
the game from the title screen and can thereafter be used to 
pause the game. 



Master of The Mind tire is a great game which Disk 
Subscribers will receive automatically as a Bonus with this 
issue* Other readers may obtain a copy of the Issue 32 disk, 
which also includes all of the programs from this issue ready to 
run, for £3,9$ (£3.59 if a subscriber) from PAGE 6, 
P.O. BOX 54, STAFFORD, ST 16 IDR 



Tape A - Issue H 



13 




GRAPH 

MAKER 









Many Atari owners use their computers for some sort of 
business or record keeping so here is a simple utility to give all 
those dry figures a bit of sparkle. Graph Maker is not a super 
sophisticated pTOgram like the commercial B/Graph but it will 
produce neat graphs of various figures, percentages etc which 
can be dumped out on a 1029, Epson or fully Epson compatible 

printer. 

The program gives you a choice of either a Pie Chart, usually 
chosen for showing percentages of a base number, a Bar Chart 
tor showing comparative values of different objects or a Line 
Graph, used for showing different values over a period of time. 

The main listing for Graph Maker will print out graphs on a 
1029 printer, but owners of Epson or Epson compatible printers 
can omit lines 30000 tt> 30150 from Listing 1 and use Listing 2 
instead. Just leave Listing I in memory and carry on typing 
Listing 2, Listing 2 can also be used as a stand alone routine for 
a Graphics 8 screen dump On an Epson or compatible printer, 

PREPARING YOUR GRAPHS 

The program has many easy to understand prompts 
throughout but details of each type of graph are given here for 
reference. 

PIE CHART: This option allows you to show percentages of 
any number neatly in an accurately segmented circle. After the 
initial circle has been drawn you will be asked to input the base 
number. This is the total that the segments of the pie chart will 
be percentages of. You will then be asked for the number of 
fields you require which is the number of segments that the 
total will be divided into, so if you wanted 5 segments you 
would tvpe "i . 

The name and size of each field is then requested. The size 
should not be input as a percentage, but as the actual number it 
represents. Each segment is then calculated and drawn, and the 
name is printed next to it. After all the segments have been 
named and dTawn you are asked for the title of the chart- You 
will finally be given the option of either dumping the screen to a 
printer, or creating another graph. 

BAR CHART: You can use this option to create graphs with 
up to 3d bars across (the x-axis), and a wide range of scales are 
available on the y-axis. 

After choosing the number of bats you want you are asked for 
the smallest number you want on the y-axis, which can be any 
number from 0-49. Next you are asked for the maximum, 
which can be any number from 1-50, as long as it is larger than 
the minimum number, but the difference between the two 
cannot be more than 18- The numbers on the y-axis are then 
plotted, with the scale calculated automatically thus using as 



Jason Peasgood presents a 
utility for pie charts, bar 
graphs and line graphs for 
simple home use. The 
program is suitable for the 
1029 printer but we have added 
a routine for Epson 
compatibles 



much of the screen as possible. 

The height of each bar is then requested. You must calculate 
the figures according to the scale selected and you can only 
enter whole numbers up to the maximum chosen. After the bar 
chart is drawn you are asked if you want to create another graph 
or print the current one. If you choose to print it you will be 
asked for individual names for each bar, and labels for both 
axes. 

LINE GRAPH: This can be used to create a line graph, similar 
to the son you see on a manager's office wall referring to sales 
over an amount of time, but the figures could represent 
anything such as the increase in a baby's weight over a given 
period of time for example. 

You will first be asked for the number of points you want 
plotted, up to a maximum of 36, You are then asked for the 
y-axis scale and the value of the points on the x-axis, with the 
same rules applying as for the bar chart. The points are then 
plotted, according to the numbers that were entered, and joined 
up. When this is complete you are again asked if you want to 
dump this graph to a printer, or create another graph. If you 
choose to print it you will be asked for axis labels but you have a 
choice whether you want individual labels for each point or if 
the x-axis label is the general name. For example the x-axis 
could be called 'November' or each point on the x-axis could be 
a separate day /date. 

ROUTINES INCLUDED 

General routines included in the program are a short program 
for printing text quickly onto a Graphics 8 screen and a routine 
for drawing an accurate circle- The printer dump routine is a 
Graphics 8 scteen dump for the 1029 and starts at line ^0000. 
Remember, if you have an Epson printer, use Listing 2 instead. 

FINALLY ... 

This program may not be as sophisticated as commercial 
products like Mini Office II or B/Graph, but it is a cheap and 
effective way to produce simple graphs and charts which should 
cope well for small every day needs like who pays what 
percentage of the telephone bill! 



14 Tag? ft - tssut 5 I 



HJ REM H MK1CX1C*KKK H :H HMH> 

KA 1 REM « Graph Hakpr 

TB 2 HEM » btf 

»L 3 REN « Jason Peasgood 

IY 4 REM * 

BJ 5 REM # PAGE 6 MAGAZINE - tit CLAUD 

OP 6 REM »*»»»"* im in mi N ii t 



YE 10 PI" FS CllOl ,B5 I10> , ASlll , IS C41> 
MJ 15 T*=" 

BO 20 POKE 55?, 0: TRAP 15 

ZX 3B GRAPHICS 0;SETCOIOR 2 , O , O : SET C 01 DR 

L,0,B:POKE 752,1 
DO 40 POSITION ft,*i^ "l— I 



T — 1 — 1 I I T 



— 1 1 — I " 

RZ 50 FOR R-l TO 21 STEP 2:PO5ITI0N BjSi' 1 

"III I I I I I I I I 

I J"; iNEXT R 

KB 60 FDR R = 2 TO 22 STEP 2 : POSITION 0,R:? 

" \ \ I I I I I -t I I I * 

+—i"i iNEXT R 

6Y 70 POSITION 8,22!? " ' * ' ' ' — * — ' ■ ' 

J I 1 I I I I 1 ' ' ' ■■; 

FY 80 POSITION 9,3:? "G I R I A I P I H I - I M I A I K I E 

I R I " 
TT 90 POSITION 7,7!? "II |P|I|E| |C|H|A|R 

ITI" 
KK 109 POSITION 7,*1? "21 lOfAlRl I C I M I ft I 

RlTl" 
UK 110 POSITION 7,11;? "SI lUHNlEl |G|R 

IAIPIHI" 
ZC 12B FOR R = TO 3^ 
SH 130 FOR JSJi TO RND (0J»±1 
UM 140 POSITION R,23-Ti? "fjiMEHT T 
JN ISO HEHT R 
RF 160 POKE SS5,J* 
KM 170 FOR R = TO ISiSETCOLOR 1,B,R:HEHT 

R 
HI 1*0 CL05E H1.0PEH Bl , 4 , , "K i" 
GA 190 GET HI, A: FOR R-15 TO O STEP -liSOU 

nd a, 100, IB, n; sound i, ioo , &,r rwertT B:i 

F fl<49 OH A>51 THEN 190 
RJ 200 ON A-4A GOTO lOOO t 2000, 3BBB 
PC 210 GOTO 19B 
PH 999 REM ■J<JJM!ETi4l 
PR IBOO FOB R=15 TO O SIEP -1 : SETCOLOP 1, 

B,R:NEKT R i TRAP lOOO 

yj lata graphics a; set col or 2.o,« jSETCOL© 

R 1,0,15 
YB 1920 CDLDR 1 

YI 1IHO X=lBB:V=BOlR=76iGOSUfl 1700 
MI 1040 PLOT X,Y:ORAHT0 X,Y*R 

UK 1050 ? "rEntwr Base number — ";:iNPuT 

BASE 
MZ 106O IF BASE<=B THEN IBM) 

HP 1O70 ? "►Enter nunber of fields — "jtl 

MPUT FIELD 
UM 1BB0 IF FIELD<2 OR INT (FIELD) OFIELD T 

HEH 1B7B 
FV 1B98 CBUHT=BASE!DEG :Pl-fl 
XC 110O FOR T-l TO FIELD-L 
EJ 1110 T "(Enter- NAME of field "?Tj" — " 

;; INPUT H S 

HD 1120 ? ">Eirt#r SIZE of field ";?;" --" 

;; input size 
kq 1130 if si?e>eoumi or size <b then 112b 

Bit 1L40 COUHt=COUNf-SIZE 

KW 11SB P= C368MSIZE) -'BASE 

UN 11GB P1=P1#P 

YF 1170 PLOT H f V 

MR 1180 DRAHTO XtSIHtPl I «• , V*COS <P1 J *R 

IX 1190 P2=Pl-€P/2i 

GH 120O PLOT H*SimP2»«R»ir*caS<P21*B 

RY 1Z10 IF P2<-180 THEN DRAHTO 3 1 <J , Y+tlVj t 

P2)*R:Xl=31?-f8*LEH(B5>) :OOTO 12 jo 
DG 1226 DRAHTO B. Y*C0S(P21«R:K1=0 
JH 1230 Y1-IHT1Y*CAS<P2>*MU : bOSUB IBOO 
NH 1240 IF COUNT =0 THEH 13 SO 
JZ 12SB HEKT T 
BC 12&A P2=(lB8-Pll/2 
PA 1Z7B P3-3B0-P2 
HI 12BB IF PK-lftO THEH DRAHTO 319,Y+C0S{ 

P2I*H:GOTO 1250 
ZT 1290 PLOT X+SIN(P3J*R,¥+C05(P2J»R:DRAW 

TO 8,Y*C0S(P2)«R 
KZ 13O0 ? "►Enter NAME a* field "jFIELDj" 

— "J : INPUT B* 
SP 1310 IF P3<-iafl THEN Kl-311- tLEN CB$)*S 

1G0T0 1336 



QA 132D HI H 

KM 1I30 Yl=INT(Y*COSlP2**«l 

BB 1340 GOSUB 1000 

(,/ 13SO ? "► Enter title di chart" 
kv isto ? "►then press STBRT to print" 

NC 1370 7 "► OP SELECT TO EKJT." 

NC USB 7 "►'■;:INPUT FSilF LEN»F$J>30 THE 

N 1350 
LX 1390 t "K" 
OR 1400 POKE 752,1 

LZ 141A POKE 82, £40-LEH(FS> >^Z 
OH 1420 7 i? E&IPOKL 82,2 
TH 1430 IF PEEKC5J?7?I=S THEN RUN 
LF 1440 IF PEEKt53Z7^J =6 THEH COSUB 30BOO 

:COTO 1460 
OU 1450 tiOTO 1430 
BC 1488 REM 



HJ 

HP 
FT 
01 
FH 
Gil 
DA 
FH 
AZ 
KZ 

oc 

OU 

MK 
UK 
AA 
PT 



PC 
KM 
HY 
SO 
HO 
IH 
BA 
JO 
RV 

UK 

YC 
EO 

LN 

UN 
NU 
TO 

IS 

L D 
JO 



HE 1400: CHR5C27} SCHRS 1143 



= 1029 CODE FOR ELONGATED PRINT 



14O0 LPPINT CHR5CI?) ;CMH$fl4) ;TSCl,lB- 
tLEN !tF£l/211 IPS 
1470 RUN 



1480 
169» 
1 7BB 
171B 
17ZO 
1730 
1740 
1799 
IftOO 



OY 
HF 



BS 



DM 



QT 



GR 



OF 



GL 



HZ 
NL 



HT 



END 
REM 

D!f> 
FOR 



TO 8 STEP 



TO 304 ST 



!PLOT H,Y+R 

1=0 TO 360 STEP 3 
DRAHTO H+S1HCI>*R, Y*COS[T3*R 
NEXT I 
RETURN 

SCRN = PEEK lOOl *256*PEEK tBSJ : DIS= (H 
1^B)+(Y1-41»40 
1610 LCN^SCRH^DIS 
1BZB FOR CHAR=1 TO tEWCftJ) 
1030 A5-BSCCHAR, CHARJ :U = Abt IfiSl 
1040 IF U>127 THEH V=U-12B 
1050 IF U>31 AHD U<96 THEH U=U-32 : GOTO 

1S7B 
1090 IF U<32 THEN U=U+64 
1070 CL-57344tU*B 
1BBO FOR BVTE=B TO 7 

1890 POKE LCH*BVTE*40,PEEKICI. + BVTEJ 
1900 NEXT BYTE 
1-Jlfl LCH-LCH + 1 
1920 NEXT CHAR 
1930 RETURN 

2000 FOR R=15 tO STEP -1 i SETCOLOH 1, 

B,R!NEXT RtTRAP ?BBO 

2B1B GRAPHICS 8;SETCOL0R 2, O , O : SETCOl O 

R 1,B,15 

2020 COLOR 1 

203B Hl=25SBS="-"iF0R Yl=14* 

-flitBSUB 1B00:NEXT Yl 
Z04O T1=14B;B* = ,, I ,, :F0H Xl = 32 
EP B:GOSUB 180O:NEXT XI 
2B5A PLOT 29,8 
2000 DRAHTO 29,139 
2O70 DRAHTO 310,139 

2080 ? "pEnter nunfaer ot bars — "jilNP 
UT BARS 

ZO90 IF BARS<1 OR BARS>35 THEN 2880 
21BB f "►Enter y axis mm nun ";:INP 
UT MIN:IF MIH<0 OR MINOlNltMlNl THEN 
Z1O0 

2110 ? "(Enter 1 y axis 

UT MAX; IF HAM<=HIH OR 

H+10 OR MAHOSNTtMAH* 

2120 Xl=9iYl=148 

2130 F^=" B1234567BS 10111213 

141516171B1920Z1Z2Z3Z4252627282 9303132 

33343530 3 7 333 94A41 424344454B4 7484?SO" 

214B Yl-l*OJBS=F^(MIN+MIN+2,HIHtHIH*3» 

:GOSUD Laaa:Vl=140 

2150 FOR R-MIM+7 TO HAH+ 1 l BS=F S (R *R , N * 

R+1J : Vi=Yl-IHT IlIl^fMAK-MINJ ) ; GO SUB 18 

BBINEXT R 

ZIOO F*=" 1234567691111111111222222222 

2333333?" 

2170 T1 = 14B:F0R R = 3 TO BARS + 3 f K1=R*B '.A 

*=FSIR-2,R-2J rGOSUB lflA0:NEM1 R 

21BB F$=" O1234S67B9012345fr78 

9B1234S6"tIF BAR5<18 THEH ??«« 

219B Y1^15B:F0fi R±3 TO BARS ♦ 3 ; HI -R*fl : B 

£ = F£€R-2,R -2J : GOSUB J flflfl : NF K 1 H 

Z200 FOR R=l TO BARS 

221B ? "►Enter height at bar ,l ;R;" — " 

; ; INPUT HEIGHT 

2220 IF HEIGHT<HIH OR HEIBHT>MAX OR HE 

ICHT<>IHttHEICHT> THEH 2210 



Maxinun --"j:INP 

HAX>50 OR MAK>M1 
THEN 2118 



I'a.K*; ft - Ihim 12 



GRAPH 



R«B+ZA+T,13? 



2238 IF HEIGHT=MIN THEM 2298 

2240 Y-HO 

2250 FOR E-MTN+2 TO (MAH+ 1 1 - <HAK -HE IGH 

Tl :Y=V-ti31/lMAH-HIHJ) tREXT E;Y=YF1 

22ft* FOB 1^1 TO fl'.PLOT 

2 2 70 BRftMTO R*ft*y3+1,Y 
KJ 2 26* HEKT T 
JO 2 2** HEHT R 

2360 COLOR BiFOR T=135 

♦23+4,T:DRAHT0 319,T:HEXT 

2316 ? "► Enter TITLE of 
"Mh*n prrss START 
"► or SELECT to 



HI 
JU 
SA 

HM 

Tl 



BG 



TO 



GO 
KM 

MB 



2328 7 
7 3 10 ? 

HP 2 34* ? 
H 2340 

LH 235B ? 
2368 
2378 
2 380 
2 3 90 
Z4BB 
2418 
2415 



143 

T 

chart" 
to print 

EXIT," 1 



PLOT R»8 



PT 
MO 
PH 
TV 
ftZ 
Tl 
VH 



INPUT FS:IF LENCFSJ>3B THE 



POKE ?S2,1 

POKE 02 , C40-LEMIF5J 1 ft 

? tl FStPQKE BZ,2 

If PEFKC53279J-5 THEM RUN 

IF PEEKC53279)r6 THEM GOTO 2420 

GOTO 23?8 



REM 



nwin 



UJ 



2420 i prim! chrsiz7j ; chr5 c14j i" 
;fs 

2438 LPRINl ! GOSUB 38888 



HE 

dh 7 448 » :? ;? :* "(Enter i**h* of *-axis 

— ";! INPUT F$:IF LEHCF$»>20 THE* 2448 



2458 ? "(Enter naw of y-axis -- M ;:INP 

UT TS.IF LEHIT$J>20 THEN 2458 
2460 LPRINT : LPRT.NT ■ H-AHI 

<5 s ";F*i" V-flHIS = ";TS 
FJ 2478 LPRINT ! LPRINT 
2488 FOR R=l TO 0AR5 

Z49B ? "►enter natw of fc»f "jlH" -—"M 
INPUT fS 

2500 LPRINT " " i ■ J " ~ "iF* 

251* NEHT R 
RUN 



HP 



CA 



VB 
All 



IV 

N0 
FH 
00 
TZ 



ZS2B 
7530 END 
25*9 REM 
3000 FOR 

0, R : MFHl 



-liSETCOLDR 1, 



R = 15 TO * STEP 
R STRAP 3888 
3610 GRAPHICS 8 : 5ETCOLOR 2 , 8 , O : SETCOLO 
p 1,1,15 
3928 COLOR 1 

3838 m=2S!8S = '*-":F0R Y1=14B TO ft STEP 
-6 ; CO^UB lftOft:HFKT VI 
10 3048 V1=140!B5-"|":F0R H1 = 3Z TO 384 ST 

EP 0:GOSUB 1 SOB : NEHT HI 
UO 3858 PLOT ?1,B 
NH 3868 DRAHIO 2S,13» 
TP 3078 DRAHTO 310,13? 
3030 Foh C=l TO LINE 

3098 7 "ffnter nilHber Of points — "jil 
HPIIT POINTS 

3100 IF POINTS (1 OB POINTS* JS THEH 38* 
O 

■■►Enter y iKis ninimiH — ";:INP 

TF MIN<8 OR MIMOIMKM1N1 THEN 



WL 

yd 

ER 



BY 
CC 

HT 

PS 



YR 



PC 
MJ 



3118 ? 
UT HIN 
3118 
3120 7 
UT IHMt 
♦ lft OR 
3130 
3140 



"tElVter « axis "aiiwiw — "jsIHP 
IF MAX<H1H OR H0K> SO OR HAH>MIH 
HhXOlNTCMflM] THEN 3128 

H1=?:Y1=148 

F$ = " 812345678? 16111213 



141516171819 20212 22 32 4 25262 7 2*2 93*3132 

3 3 3435363 7 SB39404 1424544454 &474B4958" 
0H 3150 Y1=148!BS=F$(MIN+MIN+2,MIN+MIN+3J 

: r.OSUB 18BBiYl=14B 

3168 FOR R = M>IN + 2 TO HJMt+1 ; P5 = F5 (R + H , R + 

R + l) ;Yl = Yl-IHT«131^<«fiM'tfIHJl iGOSUB 16 

Q8:NEHT R 

3170 F5-" 12345678?1111111111222222222 

73333333" 
EH 3188 Y1=148:F0R R-3 TO POINTS+3 : H1=R*6 

;05=F*CR-2,R-2J :G0SUB 1300:NEHT R 

3190 F* = " O123456789O12345076 

?B123456"iIF P*IHT5<1B THEH 321* 

3Z0* V1=156;FDR R = 3 TO PD1HTS+3:K1=0*« 

:B5=FS*B-2,R-2J : GOSUB 1888 : NEHT R 

3210 FOR Rrl TO POINTS 

3228 ? ■■►Fnter height of point M ;R;" - 

-"; : INPUT HEIGHT 

3238 TF HEIGHT (Mitt OR HEIGHT>MAH OR HE 

IGHTOTNf *HEIftMTJ ThEH 3220 

3248 IF HEIGHTrMIN THEN YrlI9:G0T0 128 



BQ 



0X 



HD 

DF 

N0 
KF 

HT 



JZ 5258 V=140 

■iE 3260 FOB E-HIN + 2 TO tMAX+l) - tMAH HE ICM 

T) ■V=V-1131/'EMAH-MTN] 1 :HEHT E:Y=Y*1 
TU 3278 IF R-l THEH PL0T ftW8+27,Y 
fZ 3200 DHAHTO R"0*27,Y 
Jtt SZ?8 NEXT R 
BH 3388 COLOR : FOR T-1J5 TO l43:PLOt ft** 

+ 23»4,T;DP-AUT0 319, T: HEHT T 
GP 3310 7 "► Enter TITLE a i Chart" 
KO 3320 7 "F-then press START t* print" 
HS 3S38 ? "I *r SELECT to EHIT." 
OF 334B ? ">'", TlHfUT FS i TF LEN (F«3 > 38 THE 

N 3340 
LN 3358 7 "H" 
PJ 33&0 POKE 752,1 

MR 3370 POKE 82 , (46 -LEH «F 5 i i /2 
PP 3388 ? :? FS SPOKE H2,2 
TZ 3S»B IF PEEK€S327?»=5 THEN RUN 
5H 3406 IF PEEKtS32 75J=6 THEN G0TO 3428 
TU S410 GOTO IJ»B 

UK 3428 LPRIMl CHR5 l?7J ;CHR?fl4) J" 

;F* 

HF 3436 LPRIHT : GOSUB 588B8 

GS 3448 7 :? '■? I? "►Enter name Of X-a*iS 
--"jSlHPUT F5:IF LEN£F*1>20 THEM 3440 

rc 3450 ? "F-Enter nam at y-axi^ — "isiNP 

UT T$;IF LER(T*>>20 THEN S45B 
CB 3468 LPRIHT SLPRINT " H-AHl 

S ~ ":FS;" Y-AKIS = ";TS 
FK 3470 LPRINT i LPRINT 
WU 34B8 ? "►Enter nam Of paint 1" 
flii 3498 7 "►Or RETIIRH for n«» na«*s — n J!l 

NPUT F*:IF F S-"" THEN 3550 
PH 3588 LPRIHT " "ilj" - "JF* 

01 3S10 FOR R=2 TO POINTS 

EC 352* ? ■■►Enter nam at point "jRj" — " 

i : INPUT F$ 
2E 3538 LPRIHT " ";R;" - ";F5 

JI 5548 NEHT R 
NH 3558 HUH 
FR 3S68 EHR 
TN 2???» REM 



SCREEN DUMPIC102JJ 



CHANGE AS APPROPRIATE 



HA 



SH JBB08 SCREEN=PEEK(8ai+2S6»PEEXtB9J :I0* 

B=l 
00 38810 0FFSET=60 
OH 38828 ON PEEK * 157*1 = 6 GOTO 38830 : RESTO 

RE 3O060-F0R I = B TO 171 : READ A: POKE 15 

3GI-I r O;HEHT I 
EU 30038 FOR PR=B TO 24 ! CL05E HIOCBJOREH 

HIOCB,a,B,"P;":7 HIOCB j CHRS C27> ;"*"JtH 

R$(27) ;"A";CMBSI1J ;CHftS t*4*OFF5ET J ; 
VO 38848 OH 0FFSET=B GOTO 3BBS8 ! FOR 1=1 T 

OFFSETS? JJjOCB;CHRf t*J ! :NEKT I 
PF 30058 DUMHV=USR(lS36,IOCB,*tREEH» J^CHE 

EN = SCftEENf288;NEKT PR '.RETURN 
ZG 38B60 OATA 104,164,184,19,10,18,18,141 
,182,6,184,141,173,6,184 

D0 30078 DATA 141 , 172 , 6 . 16^ , 8 f 1*1 . I«I* *' s 
2,54,6,24,17 3,9 4,6,105,1,141,172,6,173 

PO 38838 RATA 95,6,185,0,141,171,0,230,18 
3, 6, 1 73, 163, 6, 281, 48, 288, 226, ?6. 162, 6, 

24 

RO 30BA6 DATA 17 3,173,6,157,95,6,171,172, 
6,157,94,6,1*5,40,141,172,5,173,173,6, 

185 
OH 3610S DATA 0,141,173,6,24,138,185,6,17 
8,224,37, 144,221,162 ,8,14,255 . 255 , 62 , 1 

74,6 
OT 30118 DATA 14,255,255.62,174,6,14,255, 
255,62. 174,6,14,255,255,62,174,6,14,25 

5,255 
KD 3BI2B &ATA 62,174,6,14,255,255,62.174, 
6, 14, *SS, 255, 52, 174 ,6, 232, 224,0,268, 28 

?,174 
Hfl 3*138 DATA 182 , 6 , 16? . 11 , 157 , 66, 3 , 1&9, 1 
74,157,68,3, 169 , 6, 157,69,3 , 1&9, B, 157 , 7 

3 
OA 36140 0ATA 3,169,8,157,72,3,32,86,228, 

96 
OH 30158 RETURN * 



Epson screen dump for 
Graph Maker on page 18 



16 



Page A - Issue 32 



DON'T MISS 
THESE GREAT 
BACK ISSUES! 



PAGE tf back issues represent an excellent way of increasing the 
enjoyment of your Atari with articles to enlighten you, programs to type 
in and reviews of software to guide you. Almost all of the content of past 
issues will be as fresh and relevant today a* when it appeared. -increase 
vour enjoyment mi*, before ifs inn late? Disks are available for all 
issues, v'Tiiaiiiing all the S-hii proErams from each is<iue ready in run, 
and they often include bonuse* not found in the magazine. 



ISSUE iil-CRAl'HICS SPECIAL. A super special issue with a graphics 
[heme. Draw sonic masterpieces with GRAPHICS WORKSHOP and 
explore your graphics potential with Colour Palette, Picloada, Colour 
Attributes and CIO Slideshow. An in-depth review of Print shop and 
Graphics Art Department, the final part of Display Lists and the 
Adventure column, 1 1 pages devoted to the ST plus a colour feature 
ATARI ART and ST GALLERY. And there's mote! BLOCKBREAKEK 
is one of the best panics to have been published in any magazine. Don't 
miss it! 




DISK AVAILABLE - 
Graphics Workshop 



includes BUM'S PICTURES for 



ISSUE HI - A packed issue with games, TRAIN CRAZY, REVENGER 
andFORKLIFT, Utilities SCALEMA5TER, QUICK DISASSEMBLER 
and Measuring Temperature- Programming hints with Doing The 
Impossible, Error S Solved and THE GLIDE TO ERROR CODES- 
Reviews of Flight Simulator II, Hitchhiker's Guide 10 the Galaxy, and 
the latest Ad 1 emu res- Per the ST a DEGAS to NEO convener. Lattice C 
reviewed and reviews of a whole host of software. 



DISK AVAILABLE, Ail prog rams ready to go. 



ISSUE 22 -More serious users will enjoy SMARTSHEET, * Yisitak Like 
type-in spreadsheet, plus our review nf Paperclip whilst gamesters will 
puizlr over TRICKY CUBES and try to survive HIDDEN DEPTHS, The 
(juide to Error Codes is concluded and there are articles on Fractals, 
Tape Problems and some Jess well known Adventures, Loads of reviews 
and some great re* routines for Block breaker- ST users will find out 
how to program Sprites and can read reviews on Time Bandit, 
Pro-Fortran " VIP Professional and more, 




DISK AVAILABLE - DOUBLE SIDED! Contains 
TWO versions of TRICKV CUBES an J new versions of 
BLOCK BREAK ER- 



ISSUE 23- Another superb machine language game WATER SKI 
SCHOOL will test your reflexes WORPSEARCH will challenge those 
who like puzzles and other listings include SUPER CLOWN" and the 
utilities XRFE and VERIFY- A huge review of Ultima IV heads a 
comprehensive review section and doing Dnlinc Part 1 will let you know 
if telecommunications is for you, ST owners can discover how to get a 
bigger screen on their colour monitor and read review* of Zoomracks, 
Sierra On- Line adventures and Pro-Pascal amongst others. Also, is it 
worth adding a if 1 drive to your Sir 



DISK AVAILABLE, Contains TWO BONUS 

programs: 



ISSUF12J-The biggest issue SO far published! Great ST section with infii 
about ST disks and cartridges and loads of reviews, l-or 8-bit users there 
is MUNCH Y MADNESS, the best game we have ever published plus u 
super cheque book utility AUTO CHECK. Plus all about checking your 
disk drive, another game called FLYING HIGH, more utilities, reviews 
of RAM HIT, Adventure games and lots more. Too much in this issue to 
list fully! 



DISK AVAIL A HUE- linn 1 ! miss MUNCHY 
MADNESS, the best game we have published so far! 



ISSUE 25 - Another biggie! A must for 1029 printer owners with i great 
utflltlffl Including a SCREEN DUMP, A super Japanese chess game 
called SHOG1, a type in REVISION C BASIC, a full feature on disks and 
more. For ST, type in OTHELLO, reviews of LEADER HOARD and 
MEAN IS, Hints and Tips and several other reviews and articles. 



DISK AVAILABLE 
READY TO GO! 



ALL THOSE 11129 PROGRAMS 



ISSUE 26- SOLID MODELLING is one of the best non-game program* 
we have published. Be creative! Other programs include SOURCE 
WHITER for machine code programmers, FLEXIBLE FINGERS to help 
you type, NUTS and more. Reviews of TRIVIAL PURSUIT, DVC 65, 
SPEED SCRIPT and much, much more, ST users tan learn all about 
HARD DISKS, FAST BASIC, TYPESETTER ELITE, DEGAS ELITE 
and read reviews on a whole lot mure software. 



DISK AVAILABLE -DOUBLE SIDED! TWO virtually 
full sides with BONUS SCREENS fur SOLID 
MODELLING! 






ISSUE 27 - Some cracking listings for the K-hit. In GREAT BRITAIN 
LTD. you can he the Chancellor and help run the country. COMPUTER 
GAMMON is a great Atari version of backgammon and there's ANTS IN 
YOUR PANTS, DISK COMMAND and others. There is a feature on 
word processing and stacks of reviews. The ST section includes an 
in-depth review of ART DIRECTOR and a neat little program to put 
scrolling stars on your screen! Lots of reviews including II AHAYIEW. 
K- SPREAD 2, K -WORD and many more, 



DISK AVAILABLE - some L-O-N-G LISTINGS! 



ISSUE 28 - Extend the incredible original Munch v Madness with the 
MUNCHY MADNESS SCREEN DESIGNER, play GREEDY 
CATERPILLARS with a friend, teach your children with MOST HEAR] 
MATHS or make up some crosswords with XWORD, A long feature on 
llight Simula lion programs, hints onZORK and loads of reviews, For ST 
users, the firs! in a series of USING GEM from C plus FLIGHT 
SIMULATOR II reviews:, new books from COMPUTE! and a whole stack 
of review*. 



DISK AVAILABLE - Also contains the winning title 
screen from our competition. 



ISSUE 29 - One that serious 6-bit users have been waiting a long time for 
- a great full feature database - MJDBASE plus an imaging story 

maker, STORYBOOK, that allows you to create illustrated stories. Then 
there's a great game from ANTIC called CLIFFHANGER and an 
AUTORUN marker and more. Cheat on commercial games with 
ZAPPING THE RIGHT BYTE and read stacks of reviews. The ST 
section has a type-in program, SCREEN GRAUIHLR, which allows you 
to 'snatch' pictures of commercial games to disk, plus the next part in 
our GEM FROM C series and reviews of Superbase Personal, K-COMM 
I plus lots of games Including Barbarian, Another big issue. 



DISK AVAILABLE. DOUBLE SIDED, With BONUS 
story for STORYBOOK and STORYBOOK reader. 



ISSUE 30 — A great follow up to Solid Modelling allows you to animate 
*-D objects. Try ?t-D ANIMATOR. How about a pu stale with LETTER 
CASTLE or an arcade style shoot-up from ANTIC called DESERT 
CHASE I' Articles include an in-depth look at GUN SLING ER, Genealogy 
With Your Atari and First Step* on saving screens- Loads of reviews 

including AUTO DUEL aod P:R: CONNECTION. The Si section 
includes the continuing GEM series, CYBERSTUDIO, ZOOMRACKS II 
and luads of games and serious reviews including GFA BASIC, K-Roget, 
Jupiter Probe and more. 

DISK AVAILABLE. DOUBLE SIDED with BONUS 
MACHINE LANGUAGE ADVENTURE only available 
on this disk! 

ISSUE 31 -Our massive Survey on all the WARD AM KS available for the 
S-blt Atari heads this issue which also includes a great lype-in 
synthesiser listing called ORIGINAL SYNTH. Other listings include 
FONT FACTORY, a nice character editor and a challenging game culled 
BOWL TRAP. A feature on SSI, mure Tutorial Subroutines, a lnng 
feature on THE NEVERENDING STORY, reviews of ROADWAR 2000 
and THE DUNGEON plus many more are also in this issue. ST 
SECRETS, a new scries on ST programming begins with a limit ai sound 
and the ST Tcviews section includes IMG *t \N, BASE TWO, TEMPI. N 
and manv mure. 



DISK AVAILABLE - All the extra files for ORIGINAL 
SYNTH set up ready to run plus all the Other listings- 



All back issues are £1 .20 each in the U.K,, £ I .fS for Europe or surface 
mail elsewhere and £2.7S for Air Mail outside Europe- 

PAGE b Issue disks will run on any N-bil Atari with 4Sk or Mk memory. 
Each disk is Just £3.95. Postage Is FREE in U.K. Overseas please add £1 
per order (for any number of disks). 



Please make cheques postal orders pavablc tn PAGE'! 6. Send your order 
to PAGE e, P.O. BOX 54, STAFFORD^ STI6 1DR, ENGLAND, 

ACCESS and VISA accepted. Telephone 07*3 2139ZS. 



Page 6 -Issue 32 






*x 



^x. 



•< r 



is 



i ii i iro\i\ 

26b Heath St., 

Golbome, 

Cheshire 

W A 3 3 A D 

Tel: 0942 718423 



NOW OPEN! 

NR. WIGAN 

If you can't 

see it ring! 



— ■ COMPUTERS 

Vfj.i SI 5V1.-5 

MrgiST4 SMIIS 1 

— -PRINTERS ■ 

KXP 10(1 

mp Hi 

CH.I*n 13QD 
MPl«J 
Prr-iie* Standi 

Al Pru-liri in ilsMM 



SOFTWARE 



f??S SO 
f i« 00 

i&SC 00 

mis oo 



■ Qiffc Drives 



I'M Cum jnj 
1 M T+iiftfll* 
D'iv* Clfar.fr 



OuflrilyrPi Pii in-1 

Outrun 

WteMI 

tpj'i Greiteil 

E"dura flicer 

Eti 

F'ight Simulator II 

HUllSI 

Space Harrnr 

Sipygon 

GFA Arr.il 

Kumi l.ingi 1 
TiinewOfkE Range 
lit Wnrd Plui 



irDm U5 M 
1rom £T(3 M 

l-Hll L lit 4 9 



J.JT^H- >■> 



ST-Sc»r1 
ST^pfinter 
Jo^-e ittntion 

Monitors — 

Mpng SVi5 
Colour SC 112-i 
Pmiip»CMIH!3J 
Philip* 7S0I 

^^— ^^— Dust Cavers - 



Ou ct Shot ii SB-9S jD»-eittn 

T„rto Q Jhat tllti 

Pro 500,0 tlUS 

*■'»•'«■' "*" M P n 0S M 

, H s rawer* "*£ « 

Philips cr 

■^52300 M*rj,m £119 00 Philip* 75 

■UNBELIEVABLE DISC PRICES - — 
'■! Ii OJ ^S* ti« STrv 

IJ-M :C3J 5C-I30 tO 95 SMlJj 

PlMllC Liorarp CUM d Bl 8* nh f l M< ! |d $0}. " d Hi. 
, ll-diiku lotdjble 19 95 



PVbb» mah* »H chacius* PflO *1c. payable 1o FUTRQNIX 

All prices include WAT and delivery 

B^B Please phona or sand SAE for latest ll*ts 
Shop open & - 5.30 VISITORS WELCOME 






520ST 



ATAR REPAIRS 



fljXL/XE 



Atari Approved Service Centre 

All Atari products repaired. Computers. Printers, Monitor* 

SPECIALIST DISK DRIVE REPAIRS 

Atari trained engineers 

All work fully guaranteed 

Free estimates 

AVON MICRO CENTRE 

Unit A, Western Road Industrial Estate, 
Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire CV37 0AH 

Telephone: 0789292269 






XL/XE MOUSE 



AN ST MOUSE FOR YOUR 
XL/XE 

Includes: Mouse. Art Package, 
Fast picture loader, 
Atari ArtisvGAD translator. 
2 demo programs show the 
us6 of the mouse in your own 
software Supplied wrlh all 
operating information. 

All for 

£29.95 Post Iree 



\ LETTER 80 | 



10fl Navk 



{ 



B0-COLUMN WP ON SCREEN 

This full-feature letter/word 

processor supports standard 

Atari keyboard editing PLUS 

wordwrap, insert & 

justification. Address, date 

and ref. area also control search. 1 

mailshot fealure. Mouse/joysiiek 

operation with pull -down martus. 

Disk only 

1 £24.95 Post fr» 

COD service available for £1 50 L 




and ;jsi«n»,'Hiip 



LDBAL COMPUTER SERVICES 



Navigation Road, NORTH WICH, Cheshire CW8 1BE {0605} 7S2413 



GRAPH 

MAKER 



EPSON 
SCREEN DUMP 



EPSON SCREEN DUMP 

by 
Phil Car* dwell 



* 



MM JOOOB REM M MI Clt l CMMK HW WM t CMmc M HmimmHKW 

TO 30B1H REM * 

TL (iltl?B HEM * 

CI 38B30 REM * 

CR s»o*a REM * 

ZH 3BO50 REM * PAGE 6 Magazine * 

NK 30B&0 REM W W W WMWWmCM I CM II W W H W WWMW il WMKW 

CG IO0?O REM 

OZ 30380 GOSUB 3014O 

HI 3BB9B REM Screen Pu«p Loop 

MC 3B10B FOR P = TO 39 i 5CREEN=±9l»40+SA"H 

5C + & ! COPV^USR «1536 .. SCREEN .EPSONl , EPSON 

2J 
GY 30110 7 BljEPSONlSi? «1 } EPS0N2S % NEKT P 
DO 301ZO CLOSE ttl J GRAPHICS 6: RETURN 
TI 38138 REM Progran Ini t ial i ia"t ion 
OA 30148 TRAP 3022O:PIM EPSOMlS (9&4> , EPSO 

NZS (964? , LEADERS (4) 
AM 30150 FAR OPERAND- 1 TO 4: REAP OPCODE i L 

EADER* tOPERAND,0PERANP) = CHR$ (OPCODE> iN 

EKT OPERAND 
IK .IfMtitl DATA 27,76,192.3 
CH 38178 EP5Oltl5 = ClHRSI0) : EPSOM IS t96*J =CMR 

StBJ JEPSON1S (ZJ=EPS0NlS:EP5OM2S = EPSONl 

s 

KP 30180 EPS0HJ.Sfl,4) =L EADEH* i EPSONZ* tl , 4 

]=LEADER$ 
G& 381^8 REM Screen Pump Rata 
II 38100 FOR OPERAND = 1536 TO 1.746iREfll> OP 

CODE: POKE OPERAND jOPCODE :NCMT OPERAMP 

p« 30210 bem initialize Printer 

MU 30220 TRAP *8O08;CLOSE H1T0PEN 81,8,0, 
"P:":? t»lJ CNR* 1273 JCHHSC84J jCHRSt27> JC 
HRStSll ;CHRSt24) 



This Graphics 8 screen dump may also be used as 
a stand alone listing or can be added to your own 
programs. It should work with any fully Epson 
compatible printer 



it, 

BY 
DZ 
CT 

HH 



A J 



TG 



K/ 



¥U 



MI 
GG 



YU 



MK 
BU 

SH 
RU 



JB230 EPSONl=APRtEPS0NlSJ : EPS0N2=ADR CE 

PSOMZt] 

30240 SAUMSC = PEEKt80J +PEEK (891*z56 

3B2SO RETURN 

10260 DATA 104 , 104 , 133 , /04 , 1 04 , 13 .1 , /Hi 

, 10)4,141, 192,6,104,141,1^1,6,104 

3BZ78 DATA 141,194,6,104,141,193,6,169 

, 1.133, 207,169, 191,135,288, 168,0,177,2 

03, 141,190,6, 165.IO? 

38738 PATA 240,20,169,8,133,207,173.19 

3,6,24,105,4,141,15 3,6,133.285,173,194 

,6,105,0, 141.194 

30298 DATA 6,133,286,76,96,6,169,1,133 

, 207,173, 191,6,24,105,4, 141,191,6,133, 

285,173, 192,6 

30388 DATA 105,0,141,192,6,133,206,32, 

137,6,32, 146,6,32, 160,6,32,137,6,32, 16 

9,6,32,160 

I0319 PATA 6,165,287,240,177,56,165,28 

3 . 233 , 40 , 176 ,2,198, 284,133 , 203 , 190, 20B 

, 165,288, 261,255,2BB, 151 

30320 PATA 96, 173 , 1 90, 6, 41 , 3 , IB, 10 

30338 DATA 176,96,160,0,189,195,6,145, 

205, 232 , 2BO, 192 , 4 , 208, 245, 96, 173 , 190, 6 

, 74,74, 141,190,6 

38348 DATA 96 . 168 , 6, 189 , 195 , 6 , 1 0, IB, IB 

,18,24,113, 205 , 145 , 285, 232 , 200 , 192 ,4,2 

OS, 236, 96, 8,8,0,0,0 

3035O REM SHADE DATA 

30360 PATA 15,15,15,15 

38378 DATA 111,0,5,0 

36380 DATA 18,5,10,5 

38390 DATA 8,0,0,0 t 



IS 



rngc-6- Issue 51 




Are Infocom lagging behind in 
innovation or have they got 
something up their sleeves? 

John Sweeney takes a look at 

their most recent adventures 

and discovers a possible 

change in direction 



Infocom continue to produce some of the best text 
Adventures in the world, They started off 19H7 well with the 
excellent Bureaucracy and Planetfall, both worthy of a place in 
any adventurer's collection. They continued with Lurking 
Horror and Plundered Hearts, both of which are, again, straight 
text Adventures of the kind at which Infocom have excelled for 
so many years. Admittedly the four adventures are all very 
different, partly because of the different styles of the authors, 
but also because they cover a diverse range of genres - The 
Romantic Novel, Gothic Horror, Science Fiction, and ... um ,„ 
well, Douglas Adams. 1 Bureaucracy is just Different! 

Despite all being excellent games, they are all straight text 
Adventures in the world-renowned standard Infocom style. 
There are no surprises in the presentation, game-play or 
facilities of any of these games, There has been talk for some 
time that Infocom may be beginning to fall behind in technical 
innovation and the use of the power of the 16 bit machines but 
then came Nord and Bert and, hopefully by the time you read 
this, Beyond Zork. Both are innovative, but in very different 
ways. 

Let's take a look at each of these most recent adventures. 
THE LURKING HORROR 

The Lurking Horror is Infocom at its best (its old best, that 
is! - mayhap Beyond Zork, previewed later, will lead us on to 
new even dizzier heights!). It was written by Dave Lebling who 
co-authored the original Zorks (1, II 3 III and Enchanter) and 
abo wrote Stareross, Suspect and Spellbreaker on hi$ own. 
With a pedigree like that you know its going to be good! This 
time he has chosen lo write a horror story full of monsters from 
Lovecraft's worst nightmares, complete with nasty descriptions 
of all the things which happen to you if things go wrong (whieh 
they do frequently!), such as the delicious descriptions of what 
the monsters do to you if you die: "Something gnawing on your 
tongue thinks its pretty wonderful!". (Actually when I first* 
mentioned that line to my wife she thought I was talking about 
a scene from the Romantic Novel 'Plundered Hearts*!) 

The adventure is set on the campus of the GUE Tech. No, 
it's not a coincidence that George Underwood Edwards and 
Great Underground Empire, (setting of all the Zorks) > have the 
same initials, but sad to say, there aren't any Grues, Most of the 
action does in fact take place deep below the campus when, 
while investigating the disappearance of various members of the 
university j you discover that the underground passages linking 
the various buildings of GUE Tech lead deeper than anyone 




AHEAD 

OR 

BEHIND? 



suspected. You soon discover they lead to blood-stained altars, 
pits with terrifying inhabitants and ancient tombs. It all seems 
to have something to do with the Alchemy Department! Along 
the way you pick up a companion to help you in your troubles, a 
sort of pet, but I won't reveal what, just that Mr Lebling has a 
most gruesome mind - yeucccch! 

The packaging is up to Infocoms usual high standard and 
includes a helpful manual, a Fresher's Guide to GUE, your 
student ID Card, 

and your very own personal monster, which sticks very nicely 
to the side of an ST screen! 

Since Infocom stopped classifying their adventures I don't 
believe they have produced any as hard as the ones they used to 
class as Advanced or Expert, I would class this as a good 
Standard Level adventure. The atmosphere is great, the puzzles 
are interesting, the implementation is excellent. Thoroughly 
recommended to all who love adventures and or horror stories. 

PLUNDERED HEARTS 

Trembling, you fire the heavy arquebus. You hear its loud 
report over the roaring wind, yet the dark figure still 
approaches. The gun falls from your nerveless hands. "You 
won't kill me," he says, stepping over the weapon. 'Not when 1 



l J :iL-'/ 6 - K-.ni' M 



19 



am the only protection you have from Jean Lafond." Chestnut 
hair, tousled by the wind, frames the tanned oval of his face. 
Lips curving, his eyes rake over your inadequately dressed 
body, the damp chemise clinging to your legs and heaving 
bosom, your gleaming hair. You are intensely aware of the 
strength of his seawom body, of the deep sea blue of his eyes. 
And then his mouth is on yours, lips parted, demanding, and 
you arch into his kiss... 

He presses you against him. "But who, my dear", he 
whispers into your hair, "will protect you from me?". So starts 
Plundered Hearts! 

You play the part of a beautiful and genteel Englishwoman in 
the late 17th Century, travelling to the West Indies 10 care for 
your ailing father. The story begins with your ship being 
attacked by pirates. You are carried off by a dashing pirate, 
Captain Nicholas Jamison- better known as the Falcon! He 
claims to be from your father, but can you trust him? Even 
worse, can you trust yourself in his presence? 

After the introduction which covers your first meeting with 
the Falcon, you find yourself alone in a cabin on the Falcon 's 
ship, which is anchored off the coast of the isle of St, Sinistra. 
The Falcon claims to be visiting Jean Lafond in an attempt to 
rescue your father from him. You have been locked in youT 
cabin, supposedly for your own safety. Unfortunately there 
appears to be a traitor in the crew: the ship is drifting on to the 
reefs, and if the reefs don't get you then when the fire in the 
stores reaches the gunpowder, the subsequent explosion will! 
This isSAFETY? 

IF you survive all that you still have to reach the island and 
face further dangers such as treacherous pirates, a most efficient 
butler, savage crocodiles, and the evil villain Lafond. 

Plundered Hearts is full of atmosphere. It really does read 
like a romantic novel, full of adventure on the high seas. There 
are, as is usual in Jnfocom adventures, lots of little touches to 
help the atmosphere, for instance the response to a blank line is 
"Prithee, pardon?", and to SAVE is "Aye-Aye"! The whole 
thing is very tongue-in-cheek, full of cliches and incorporating 
every scene you've ever seen in a swashbuckling Douglas 
Fairbanks movie. Even down to such lovely detail as (if you fail 
to escape from Lafond's bedroom): "Lafond pulls the sheets up 
to cover you both.... Waves crash against the base of the cliff.... 
You have suffered a fate worse than death!". 

Experienced adventurers may find the game a little easy. I 
don't know if I was just very lucky, but on this one I beat my 
previous record for an lnfocom game (6 hours for Witness) by 
completing Plundered Hearts in well under four hours. So, at 
its full price an experienced player may find it is not great value 
for money - if you are an experienced player looking for more of 
a challenge then I would recommend one of the older Advanced 
or Expert level lnfocom games, but if you can afford Plundered 
Hearts it is great fun to play. 

It is well written, not excessively deadly - it gives you plenty 
of warning that the ship is about to crash or explode - and it 
just won't let you do stupid things such as walking off cliffs or 
into crocodiles- It is full of humour and interesting puzzles and 
a number of the problems have two solutions to reduce the 
chance of your getting stuck. These variations can in fact lead to 
two slightly different endings - you haven't completely finished 
until you Live Happily Ever After!. Definitely a good 
Beginners Standard Level Adventure. 



NORl> AND BERT COULDN'T MAKE 
HEAD OR TAIL OF IT 

Nor, apparently can a lot of people when confronted with this 
rather offbeat game from lnfocom! Nord and Bert LOOKS like 
a standard adventure, but plays rather differently! It accepts 
commands and gives responses in the normal way, it has 
locations which you can move between, items you can examine 
and pick up and it has lots of problems to solve but if you just 
try and play it like a normal adventure you won't get anywhere. 

Although you do type in the occasional normal command 
(GO NORTH or GET BAG) most of the problems are solved 
by typing in puns, cliches, spoonerisms, well-known phrases or 
sayings, homonyms, or other such examples of verbal trickery! 

There are eight scenarios. The first seven are completely 
independent. Effectively you have seven separate games, each 
one of which uses one form of 'verbal trickery' to resolve its 
puzzles. When you have finally completed all those you are 
allowed to play the eighth scenario. Whereas, in each of the first 
seven, once you have worked out which particular form ot 
verbal trickery is being used in this game, you can concentrate „ 
on that one form, in the final part (Meet the Mayor) all the 
different puzzle types are mixed together so that it is much 
harder to work out what to do next. To help you understand the 
game it is probably best to give you a few samples from the 
instruction manual: 

> TAKE NOTE 

The tee holds the note firmly to the tabic. 

> TAKE TEE 

You grasp the tee and give it a series of mighty tugs but, as with 
Excalibur, it will take mgre than muscles to extract the tee from 
the table. 
>TEA 

The golf tee is swallowed up into a huge divot which then 
dissolves, leaving in its wake a steaming cup of oolong tea. 
or 

> LOOK AT THE STONE LAMP 

There is a beautiful Mayan oil lamp that your father smuggled 



Nord and Bert 
Couldn't Make 



Head orTail of It 

Eight It** &t Clkhw Spoontmrm ond Oihff VrrM Inthc ry 




Wl*T»( 



20 



Page ft - Issue %2 



out of Central America. 

> LONE STAMP 

The ancient Mayan relic flattens out and its edges become 
perforated leaving a lone stamp. 

or 
There is a freshly- burrowed molehill on the ground. 

> MAKE A MOUNTAIN OUT OF THE MOLEHILL 
There is a tremendous rumbJing ... the molehill crumbles away 
... mighty, jagged peaks emerge from deep underground. 

The first of those is a Homonym (two words sounding the 
same), the second is a Spoonerism (mixing up the beginnings of 
words), the third is a cliche, proverb, saving. 

Each of the games (apart from Meet the Mayor) can be 
played independently, and makes quite a good way of passing a 
few hours with a group of friends - this is definitely one where 
its worth getting as much help as possible. Although you should 
be able to get a lot of the wordplays eventually if you stick at it, 
I would be amazed if anyone actually managed all of them 
without help. Some are obscure, a few are American, and there 
are a couple which are not really very good, so you have to be 
lucky to spot them. 

Infocom obviously realised that it was rather difficult, so they 
have very kindly incorporated a full set of Invisi-Clucs into the 
game. At any time you may ask for HINT and get a list of the 
problem areas in the current scenario. You tan select one of 
these and get a number of graded clues to help you with your 
problem. Sometimes just seeing the list of problem areas is 
sufficient to point you in the rigfu direction. 

A couple of the scenarios didn't quite seem to fit the 'verbal 
trickery 1 description as far as I was concerned, but most of them 
were good fun. There are quite a few clever puzzles to solve, 
and since most of them depend on wordplay they are mostly 
humourous. Kven when you aren't successful in solving the 
problems the game has been programmed to respond with lots 
more verbal jokes to all your attempts! 

One word of warning. For reasons best known only to 
Infocom, the game refuses to load in 40-column, low-resolution 
mode. It insists on using SO-columns. So if you use a small TV 
you may not be able to read the screen very easily. All other 
Infocom games (to, my knowledge, and with the possible 
(probable?) exception of Beyond Zork) work quite happily in 
low-resolution. Strange! 

So, if you want a good 'adventure', DON'T buy this one. On 
the other hand if you like playing with words and are interested 
in a variety of amusing and frustrating challenges you will 
probably find Nord and Bert to be a worthwhile and unique 
experience. 

BEYOND ZORK 

So to a preview of" Beyond Zork, This one CAN be made to 
look like a standard adventure, but provides a whole host of new 
facilities as well. It is set in the same 'universe' as the previous 
seven Zork adventures fWishbringer, Zorks I, II and III, 
Enchanter, Soreeror and Spellbreaker). Your quest is to rise 
from a humble beginning to become an adventurer capable of 
finding the mythical Coconut of Quendor! Im afraid that's all I 
know about the story at the moment, but I have seen some of 
the facilities: 

DEFINE allows you to assign a commonly used command 
(complete or partial) to a Function Key to save you having to 
type. NAME is another command to save your typing - it 



allows you to give a name of your own choosing to any object in 
the game, MONITOR allows you to see bar charts of your six 
attributes in a window at the top of your screen, useful tor 
viewing your progress (especially during a fight). These are the 
usual sort of Dungeons and Dragons style attributes, Strength, 
Charisma, Intelligence, etc. and affect your ability to progress 
through various parts of the game, ZOOM helps you with 
mapping. The screen will usually display a small map in the top 
right of the screen showing your current location, the adjacent 
rooms, and any exits of which you are aware, ZOOM allows 
you to see more rooms, but in less detail. PRIORITY tells Lhe 
game what you want to see in the top window, for instance you 
can get it to always show the current inventory of what you are 
carrying. UNDO allows you to back out the previous command 
if something went wrong. MODE is for the purist. It gets rid of 
all on-screen maps, windows, monitors, etc. and makes the 
screen look just like an ordinary Infocom text Adventure. You 
can also let the game provide you with default attributes at the 
beginning instead of choosing them yourself. 

Unfortunately, I haven't managed to get my hands on an ST 
copy yet - so I can't tell you yet whether or not all these new 
facilities make the game better or not. My guess is that it is 
going to make Infocom Adventures even more fun to play (if 
that is actually possible), I hope to be able to let you know in 
the near future! 

Infocom appear to be on the move - it can only be good news 
for adventurers - the next one is called Border Zone, 
apparently, I believe the setting is the Berlin Wall. I look 
forward to it. • 




TITLE 



XLXE 



ST 



The Lurking Horror 


£24.99 


£29.99 


Plundered Hearts 


N/A 


£29.99 


Nord and Bert Couldn't 






Make Head or Tail of It 


N/A 


£29.99 


Beyond Zork 


?? 


£29.99(?) 




I*3R« b - 


■ Uwutil 21 



Anyone for 



Tennis is one of those simple but addictive games tor two 
players with each using a joystick. The aim is simply to return 
your opponent's shots by moving your player with the joystick. 
You gain a point each time your opponent misses and the first 
player to reach seven points is the winner, Pressing START 
begins a game and player ] serves first . Thereafter sen-ice goes 
with the points. The fire button serves the ball. 

TYPING IT IN 

The program is a machine code file which is created on tape 
or disk by the Basic program listed here. Type in the program, 
using TYPO 3 to check it as you type, and then save it to disk 
or tape in the normal way. 

If you are using a disk drive you will need a formatted disk 
With DOS written to it in Drive A. Run the Basic program and 
choose option 1 . An autoboot listing will be created on your 
disk and the game can be run by simply re-booting. 

1 fusing cassette, load the original program and place a new 
tape in your cassette. Press PLAY and RECORD and then 
RUN the program. Choose option and the machine code 
program will be written to your tape. You can now rewind the 
tape, switch off the computer and run the game by switching on 
with the OPTION and START keys held down. Press PLAY 
on the recorder and RETURN and the game will load and run 
automatically . 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

The program was written with the ATARI Assembler Editor 
cartridge and the BASIC program listed here was created using 
Steve Hillen's 'Hexadecimal Code Generator' from 
MONITOR Issue 1 1 








AE 10 REM MMMitMMwmi H H**M**HicmtH M nm iH mm 

IhHHT. * 



by 
CHRISTOPHER JOItES 



H 
■* 



Xk IX REM * 
EM 12 HEM * 
IM IS REM * 

na 14 rem *— — — " 

UY 15 REM * PAGE 6 MAGAZINE - EHGLAHD * 
Atl 16 REM w t i mtumtm"""""" 1 ' 11 """"""""""" 1 
BH 17 REM 

rn i& rem a-irn'i'^ 

md 19 rem ^mmii vi-fiW 

YT 20 TRAP 20:? "MAKE CASSETTE £BJ OR PIS 

It fl)") ilMPUT RSKilF DSK>i THEM 28 
UK 38 TRAP 48BB8JDATA 0,1,2,3*4*5,6*7,8,9 

,0,8,4.8,8,8,8,16,11,12,13,14.15 
LI 48 DIM DAT$01> ,HEKIZ2>:F0R H = 8 TO 22: 

HEAP M:HEH(KJ=M:MEMT X:LIME=3S8:RESI0H 

E 1008 : TRAP 128:? "CHECKING DATA" 
JG 58 LlME-LIME+lOi? 'LIME »; LIME i READ DA 

T$:IF LEMC8ATSJ<>?8 THEM 228 
UU 68 DATLIME=PEEKCl83)+ZS6*PEEKtlB4J:IE 

DATLIMEOLIME THEN 7 "LIME ";LIME;" MI 

S5ING!":EM0 
LY 78 FOP « = 1 TO 89 STEP 2 ! 81 = ASC CDAT$ tH , 

JO 1 -*8 : &Z = flSC C8AT* IH*1 , H + ll > -48 ! 8YTE-K 

EM CD1»*±6+MEH 102 > 
FG 88 IF PASS=Z THEN PUT ttl , BYTE J MEMT Ksft 

EAS> CHKSUM:GOTO 58 
BG 90 TBTAL = TOTAL + BVTE;IF T0TAO999 THEN 

TOT AL=TOTAL- 1888 
LR 188 MEKT K i READ CHKSUHilF T0TAL=CtMC5UM 

THEM SO 
MO 118 GOTO 228 

ZP. 128 IF PEEK£195»<>6 THEM 228 
EQ 138 IF PASS=8 THEM 178 
MY 148 IF H8T DSK THEM 1&8 
SE ISO PUT ttl,2Z4:PUT HI, 2: PUT ttl, 225 i PUT 

ttl, 2: PUT ttl, O: PUT ttl, 52: CLOSE ttl : EMO 
IJ 160 CLOSE ttl: END 
IS 178 IF MOT D5K THEM 280 

GO 188 ? "INSERT RISK WITH DOS, PRESS RET 
URM-'J :OIH IMStll :IMPUT IMS:OPEM 1*1,8,8 
, "D: AUTORUN . SYS" 
VY 198 PUT ttl, 255! PUT ttl , 255 . PUT ttl, 8; PUT 
ttl,52:PUT ttl,12S;PUT ttl,58:G0T0 218 






22 Pafc6-I*sue32 






SD ZOO ■> "READY CASSETTE AND PRESS RETURN 

";:opem tti,o,i28,'>c !":restdre 230;for 

K-l TO 4t!"RtfiD H:FUT m,N:MEKT K 
QS 210 ? :? "HRTTTMG F XLE" : PA 55 = 2 : L IME=3? 

O:RE5T0RF 1888:TRAP l?f);f,OTO 50 
MI 220 ? "BOD DATA: LIME ";LIHE:EHD 
OY 210 DATA 0,14,216,51,255,51,16-5,0,141, 

66,2, 169,60, 141,2. 211,16?, 105, 141 , 231, 

2,133, 14, 169,58,141,2 3 2,2 
FN 240 DATA 133,15,169,81,133,18,169,52,13 

3 , 1 1 , 2 4 , 96 
AZ 100O DATA A5DEaD3OO2A5360D31O2A9288DC4 

a2A?0E8DC502A9OQ8DCBO2SDC88 2A'?r>AaDr;OO? 

8DC1O2SDC2O2A9408D07D4A9, 966 
GX 101O DATA 2A8O2FOZA5OO8DOSDO8D03P88D8A 

DOA900A00099OO4G5588 4155aO4 255QO4 3CSDO 

F1A924S5B4S505A 900858085,736 
EE 1020 DATA 61 A907A235A058285 C E4AD 1 F COO 

06D0F9AOOOB98E36?9FD3 6C8C0l4DOF5A5eOB5 

B2A518BD5D3A8D6C3AA9 3680,46 8 
TC 1030 DATA OODOA9C88 D01D0A&B4 A000B97D36 

5D1A42E6C8C808D0F4A6B5AOO8B5B53B5D5A42 

E8C8C88 8DBF4A5OZ8O1DD0A5 ,644 
ZF 1040 DATA 8185B0A5B2DO17AD18D8D0FBA53O 

8SB3A5Bea5B8A5B4 166 902 85664 CE634AD11DO 

DOFBA9C8 8 56 3A90185B8A5BS,919 
JU 1058 DATA 18690285B6AD8flD2 2 9018587A900 

85BA850BA50185B 985ft 1A5B5DOFCAOBBA98 89D 

1C4 3A5BZF01AEE6C3AAD6C3A,653 
BF 1860 DATA C917F02A A000B9B&3699F036C8CO 

14DOF54CB734EE5D3AAD5D3AC9l7FeieAO00B9 

A23695FD36C8C014D0F54C87, 714 
RH 1B70 DATA 34A?OO8560A00OB9CA369?F[>3BCS 

CO14D0F54C&434A5BODOO34C62E4AD88D32 503 

C5G2FQ87C9DiF00fc4C7C35A6, 105 
KM lOBO DATA B4F0 8 4 C AC A8OB44C7C35ABB4E044 

FOO4E8E8a6B4AD0OD32336C5ZGFOO7C'?l STORE 

4CA135A6BSF004CACA86B54U, 2bO 
VS 1090 DATA A135A6B5E044F004E8E666B5A604 

AO0OB9 7D3B5D1A4 2E8G8C008D0F4A6B5AOQOB5 

B536 90 9A4 2E6C8C008DOF4A5,S44 
GU 1100 DATA B1DOO34C62E4A900854DADOED029 

83F8BDA58 185RAAF0849O185B88D1EDOA5B8DO 

14A6B3rOCBD007A90085024C, 430 
HZ 1110 DATA 7136E8ESSBB34CO93BA6B3E030D0 

8 7A581B5B74C7 1360ACA86B3A5B38DO2DOA5B7 

D015A6BGA5QQ9DlC43CAie06,51 
AG 1120 DATA A50185B785B A 8 6B64C3 D3&A6B6A5 

B09DlC4 3£BEe47DBOaA5OO85B7A90185BA86B6 

AD8D369D1C43A5BAD007A500, 783 
PU 1130 DATA DO124CB2E4A?75aD00D2A98E85BC 

a500fl90O85BAC6BCC6BCASBCC58OI>eO4A3OO8S 

BB8D61D24C&2E4A50G05B1 ftl>, 941 
DG 1140 DATA 01D285B94C&ZE4OOOOL8 16161600 

0800801818181800001640404040 4948483 4 25 

2E2E 2933 4 84 04 04040404033,308 
JO 1150 DATA 25323625404634Z5ZE2E25334848 

404840484 8 48484 8 4 04B4O4O34Z5ZEZEZ9334O 

403 3 25 32362 5484 040404027,772 
FK 1160 DATA 212D25484B2F36.2532404D404040 

70 707O4 7FD3 5 02 8 202020202 02 020207020202 



8 2 020202020 20 20 2 064 1DE36, 62 6 
MJ 1170 DATA 4048404O4O4O4O34252E2E29334O 
40 4 0404 04040806080888 08080006 080808060 
003080808880880080808080,995 
NC 11B0 DATA 3OB080 3080B0BO8O8O80B0808O8O 
800000000008 00000000000000000000000000 
000000000000008800000000, 915 
BV 1190 DATA 0000000000000000000006080000 

oooooooooooooooeaoooooooooooooooooooeo 

00000000000000 8000000000,915 
AH 1200 DATA OOOOOOOO0000000OOOOOOOOOOOOO 
00000 800000000000000000000000000000000 
080000000088000000000880, 515 
AZ 1210 DATA 0000000000000000000000000000 
000 00000000088000000008 888000000000000 
060000000000000000000000, 915 
BC 1220 DATA 0000000800000000008888888888 

00000000000000000000000000000000000000 

000000000000000000000000,915 
BF 1230 DATA OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

000000008 8 80000000000 8 88 00000000000000 

000000000000000000880000, 515 
01 1240 DATA OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOaooooooOOOOOO 

8 80000000 8 80000000000 8 88 8 8 000000000000 

OOOOOOOOOOOOO00000OOOOOO, 315 
BL 1258 DATA 6000000000006088000000000600 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 0000000000006 0000OOO00 

000000000000600000000000 ,915 
BO 1260 DATA 0000800000000000000000000000 

oeeoBoooeoeoe 880000006000088 aaooeoeoee 

0008 888800000000 88 880000,515 
BR 1270 DATA 0000600000000000060000000000 

00000008800000000000000000000000008000 

000600000000000000000000, 915 
BU 1280 DATA 0000000008880000000000000008 

0000000000000800 0000000000000000000000 

000000000888000000000000, 915 
BX 1250 DATA 0000000000000000000088880000 

O00OOOOOOOO8 880000000000 00008000000000 

000000000000000000000080, 915 
AV 1300 DATA 00000800000000000000 80000000 

00000000000000000000000000888000000000 

OOOO 8 8 8000000000 8 8 00000 , 515 
BB 1318 DATA 0888880000000000000 8 8 0000000 

0O00 8000000O0OOOO000000000O0OQOOOBO88 8 

000000000000080000000000 ,915 
BE 1320 DATA OOOOOOO06 8800000000000000000 

0000000000000000 8000000000000000000000 

800000000800000000000088, 515 
OH 1330 DATA 0000000880000000000000088688 

00000000000 8 88000000000000 8 00000000000 

oooooeeooooooooooooooeoo, 515 

FO 1340 DATA 08800000000000 8 8 880000000000 

00808080 8 08080006060 8 08080808000600060 

608080800066808080808068, 755 
ZJ 1350 DATA 30808060888080808080000008 8 8 

0080000000000 00000000000000 88 000000000 

600000000088000000000000, 35 
HK 1360 DATA OOOOOOBOOQ2F2E25 1A104 8 4 04040 

40404 0404046 34372F1A10EO6ZE1O2OO34OOOO 

000000000000000000800000 , 540 



I'agetv- Issuer 32 



li 




The GUILD 
of THIEVES 

Magnetic Scrolls Rainbird 
XL XE with 1050 or ST 

Price £19.95 £24,95 



Magnetic Scrolls started well with their Pawn and are now 
rapidly establishing themselves as a major force in the world of 
computer adventures. Their second offering, The Guild of 
Thieves, I found even better than the first. 

In its plot the Guild of Thieves is cast in perhaps a more 
traditional mold than the Pawn, Your objective is much more 
straightforward - find all the treasures and bring them back to 
your starting place. They have added a nice twist by casting you 
as a thief by profession, and they have located the game in their 
rapidly developing realm of Kerovnia so there is plenty of 
background material to flesh out their fantasy world and make it 
seem more realistic. Most of the instruction manual is devoted 
to humorous articles about The Guild of Thieves and its 
origins, and the descriptions of the game locations add to this to 
provide an interesting background to the gamc 

I recently had a letter from Allan Palmer of Basingstoke (now 
there's a place to visit if you want some practice at solving 
mazesi), who complained about the linearity of games like the 
Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, where, at least for the first 
part of the game, you only have one route to follow and if you 
get stuck then there is nothing else to try. ^ell, The Guild of 
Thieves is the exact opposite. As long as you can reach the river 
bank, get the castle open and find your lamp, all of which you 
can do very easily in the first six moves, then you have an 
enormous selection of places and puzzles to choose from. You 
can visit about sixty locations (roughly half the total), by simple 
commands such as LOOK IN, UNDER and BEHIND, OPEN 
and EXAMINE you will find over forty acquirable artifacts 
plus lots of information - make copious notes - there are clues 
hidden everywhere! Furthermore, once you have found all 
those artifacts, you will also have found plenty of problems. 
The nice thing is that at least a dozen of them are independently 
soluble. This means that there are always lots of things to try 
and you shouldn't get really stuck for some time. 

Of course there are some problems which require you to 
crack other ones first, and there are some which are actually 
insoluble (unless you happen to have located the thermonuclear 
device which you also needed in the Pawn and doesn't seem to 
be in this game either!). The difficulty is of course in knowing 
which problems are soluble and which ones aren't! Never spend 
too long on a problem until you are sure you have explored 
everywhere and at least made some attempt at every pioblem! 

The quality and variety of the problems is excellent, ranging 
from simple ones which you will kick yourself for failing to 
solve immediately, right through to complex logic problems 
which, once you have all the information, you can solve away 
from the computer just by thinking about them, I especially 
enjoyed the problems involving the Poisonous Jumper Spider, 
the 'maze' of strange Cubical Rooms, the way to make the 
Champagne Bottle explode without killing yourself, how to get 




Reviewed by John Sweeney 

inside the Bank, and the Weighing Scales which sets off an 
alarm if you try and take the treasure off it! 

The Guild of Thieves has a wide vocabulary, an excellent 
parser and lots of entertaining responses to your attempts to 
survive in this dangerous world. On three or four occasions, 
though, I was slightly frustrated by the fact that, even when I 
had correctly worked out the solution to a problem, I had 
difficulty in getting it to understand what I wanted to do. My 
subjective feeling is that it is better than the Pawn in this 
respect, but you may still find that there will be cases when you 
need to persevere with numerous attempts at phraseology 
before you succeed. Hopefully this will continue to improve in 

future adventures. 

Also, on the negative side, unfortunately for the XL owner, 
the game was written to use the power of the ST, especially to 
terms of memory usage. On the ST all responses are 
sub-second and it is a great adventure But on the XL if you 
have the graphics on in order to see the pictures of the locations 
then you will get an average response time of thirty seconds as U 
frantically loads overlays into memory. The game implements a. 
useful key-ahead buffer (but watch out it's only thirty 
characters long) and you can easily type in the next four 
commands - this will mean you have to wait two minutes for it 
to finish responding! - I found this made the game unplayable. 
Fortunately you can improve this by turning off the graphics 
Although you will still get the occasional twenty second 
response, most of the responses will now be significantly better, 
and although still frustrating when you see the ST working, the 
game now becomes playable. (N.B. If your diskette is date 



24 I' net- f> - Issue ; - 



stamped before October 1987 yen wilt find that you still get thirty 
second responses all the time on an XL - Magnetic Scrolls did Jheir 
final testing on an XEatid didn't realise that they had a bug in n 
which failed id reclaim memory . When I pointed this out to them at 
the PCW Shea they kindly fixed it and sent me a new version - by 
the lime you read this thai new version should be generally 
available. If you have an old eopy please take it back to your 
retailer and ask them to replace it,/ Another deficiency fur the 
poor XL XE owner is that they failed to squeeze in the Restore 
function after a Death - you have to Restart and then Restore 
taking over one and a half minutes on an XL - since Death, in 
the form of the Gatekeeper, the Bees, Hot Coals, Colourful 
Floors (!?), Explosions^ Ice Snakes, Poisonous Spiders, Wells, 
Rats, Bears, and various Other Death Traps abound throughout 
the land of Kerovnia, this can be a trifle frustrating. Still } I 
suspect that is the price we are going to have to pay if we 
humble XL owners wish to play all the games being developed 
for the 16-bit machines. J as L as the Cassette based machine has 
been left behind in the development of bigger and better games, 
it is inevitable that the 8-bit machine will eventually fade. Pull 
mark* to Magnetic Scrolls for at least providing a version of the 
game for the 8- bit range! 

As far as the graphics are concerned I personally don't find 
that they add a lot to an adventure unless they form an integral 
part of it (e.g. the King's Quest series) but if you like pictures 
with your adventures then, yes, The Guild of Thieves has 
excellent pictures on the ST - and does the best it can for the 
XL XE. In The Guild of Thieves I found that not only did the 
pictures not add anything, but they actually detracted from the 
gameplay. For example, the most prominent items in the 
pictures of the Temple and the Kitchen are the Pillars and the 
Table. Naturally enough I tried to EXAMINE PILLARS and 
TABLE. But they don't actually exist in the game! By taking 
notice of the pictures I was actually wasting my time! 

I would even go so far as to say that Infocom (yes, the Text 
Only people) have more graphics in their adventures than 
Magnetic Scrolls do. True they never switch into a 'graphics 
mode', But they do, where necessary , use characters on the 
screen to represent graphics as an integral part of the game. 
Examples are the maze map in Hollywood Hijinx, the display of 
your current position in the Royal Puzzle in Zork III, the 
computer displays in Bureaucracy, and especially the 
Sonarscope in Seastalker where the upper half of the screen 
shows a map of your location, either in the harbour or chasing 
the sea monster, and your normal text entries in the lower part 
of the screen cause the upper half to scroll to show your new 
position. While we're on the subject of Infocom it may also be 
worth pointing out that the GO TO command which other 
reviewers have been hailing as a wonderful new innovation in 
Guild of Thieves and Knight Ore was being used by Infocom 
back in 19R4 in games like Suspect I 

But enough about Infocom- they have had ten years and 
thirty games to get their act together, For Magnetic Scrolls to 
be producing this kind of quality on only their second game is a 
remarkable achievement. 

All in all, The Guild of Thieves is an excellent Adventure - a 
must for all ST owning adventure players (and probably XE's 
although I haven't seen it working on one) and well worth 
considering for the XL as long as you accept its slight 
limitations in that environment, * 





Hi 






SUI 


\R05Z 
















nil 


«n 




J'n 


HI VIM 


LM 


11.75 


it" RE-.rr miaatup 


11. K 


-i-.toit 


1.15 


1P.M 


■rami 


IP 15 


*npiD onmtua 


in 


115 


FLHH1 IIHULllM Jl 


11.15 


■ till Til Mill HDUIE DETECTIVE III 


rui 


MTTTHDnE 


lilt 


CDLDILVE CECIL 4.D 


in 


1D.1I 


•PILtW INIE1ELIU 


1115 


BDHFLIC1 ■ I'lEII.a 


ttm 


IL11 


l.iaibi HgpiK 


31 H 


GEUiLbE ■ runnpp 


itn 


MM 


■ l« HUtEII 


"P» 


pigut Ml Men ltd 


ut 


P. PL 


HUE 


11.11 


[HI Lilt 


Ell 


IDS 


hpih 


■Hi 


F- 15 ITil.E Ulll 


151 


a.n 


'.him iiiiiir cult 


LH 


XIu-ijim rciiuiii 


II Tl 


mm 


IIUBKBIFT 


III, 


loud iim uwf 


LI! 


in 






mmutNt 


1H 


li.15 


BUDGET CASSETTES 




uutTLEi:gnr*«i||«a 


*m 


IM 






MINllQr DM1HESI 


w,n 


1Z F* 


up 


!.K 


KENNEDY APPPWALII 


I.U 


11.75 


Lilian ur inn 


111 


HMMMM 


■.in 


11.75 


CIhtilhi 


LH 


[(•DIKIDMD iriUHtKtin 


IN 


MI 


DIUT DICE 


LH 


L 1 It Dl -. iLim 


UH 


mil 


Waikl NJailEN 


IH 


murrojEE 


■ n 


Ml 


'DUE lEtENlUHEl 


Mi 


PHIETME 


1.15 


MI, 


mu« iiiii giHE s hi ! 


»H 


tCHlMIIE WINES, 


LH 


Ml 


■wrriiLiEaw tie tun 


III 


LHEETIENUICE 


151 


SITS 


mtmtMt hclsi 


t.» 


teuton mumi u* 


IJTl 


IETJ 


gi cue 


Ml 


HUIUW 


in 


li.'S 


PAHIa 


LH 


MH LOii-im 


LH 


1.15 


FDai-pm 


1 PJ 


IpiBtiUT 


111 


11.11 


tHtm 


l.H 


iPTTHW ID 


M 


10.15 


■TDM 


l.K 


Emu tii 


IH 


11.15 


Hpjtnw 


M 


THULU Hjpiujit 


11.11 


It 15 


njUNnnEE 


i« 


Orders, over £ 5 include postage 


otherwise please add SOp 




V=B 


Cheques PO 1 


s Access num be p to:- K^^^ 


1 


r_^_3 


SUNARO SOFTWARE(P6) r ^^ 


1 


P.O. BOX 78, MACCLKi 

Ti-:i.i-:i'nONE(U62?)i 


JFIHL 


l>, tlHKSHlHE, SK10 3PF 
HCROLINK MAGW023 




5228 \ 



rut ajpucnrroti nun user pwnnflrnHBU im rmrEcriwi 
creation sasrai twt snous the wm nm all otheb 
s*cbup nnw hod otwicQitnts rjMfcrw mnr mra wi-.- 

1 U T OF DRTE 1 

IV* J6S8 SUFCR WCHtVER si *» Ifl L a *nlviiictrit*iT 
tdit emits duPliCITfi of dist softtjirt mlfc ' FVI2S' 
'SKEW. 21 and owjr (tcion par trie* dut ur*MtliOB 
tl-chnrCSfi ind it* fK>**i" Joain't end it duplication'" 

irlt EDHTMLLEm lM II | 

FREflKFKffly rWJfl yOUS HtRfiTS COhOBlTIOrHL ewtpunrc 
EflUIROtlCNT MITH tHt HOSt MUERrUL IMTtPflfll. HHRIJUflRI 
HlUJ-rjn tutft SEUE1DPEII rOH THE BSfla/IE COfFUTIfiS 

■♦LfiTEBr RELERSES4- 

SUPEBDUrl 1 XV : TransTtn «w«n riore tip* 
saftuiff ta disk is Del I as ml** dim to rfisk bjckups 
jnd i»i, 'inatl^r first f raw C6f* v 1» rKo.|j« ' , incLihlcs 
th* fitilita ta RE-IXK1P jo-tfr dunpi* ufiutrc so if 
yau vt stuck at Jtiw] 3 of sfOief »m* ■ dunp it. **it 
!Kiu hoot up th* dunp»d prOif*" il fit I Jtirt at l*«t 
3. iihen sou 3«t through 1* ttvtt 4 Ju** it aftili Hon 
th* dunprd prcfv*! u . 1 1 ft*rt *t Itvtl 4, continu* 
this p'nc»*(H.r» jt inu pO'ini ami as nans tints ms w 
»i*h'" 

C . U . f* . I . D . IMTEHFHCe KIT: 

Add 3 parallel Lntffnil iftTffKI to wr IHHOCL/XE 

s i*pp 1 1 * d v i th o»f la T** t 5m0" toi t aara , , , , 

—•"-"— ■■■....P.P.........H...JI. * » ■ i ■ 

XQSO SUPER HRCHIOER-C79,9S 
IE CQMTROLLER CflRD--Cfi4.5Si 
XL CONTROLLER CflRD'-£S9. 9S» 
LBBSiC.U.P.I.D, KIT-C24.VS 
LBBGiSUPERIlllMP IO--C1B.9S 

-Wl irtSTftLWrW SEWKE I? (WfllWBLE HI ftCeUEEt-- 



IT 



ZOMPUTCHHaJSE 



14 Romily Court, Landridge Road, 
Fulham, London SW6 4LL. 
Tel: 01-731 1276 



Page rj — Issue 32 



26 



SpartaDOS 
Construction Set/ 

US Doubler 

ICD /Frontier Software 

£49.95 

Reviewed by John S Davison 



ICD arc now producing some superb products for the 8- bit 
user, and the two reviewed here can only enhance their 
reputation further. The first is SpartaDOS, a replacement for 
Atari DOS which can be used on any 8-bit disk system. Better 
still, you can use it with its companion ICD product, the US 
Doubler, a hardware modification to add sparkling performance 
to your old 1050 disk drive They are marketed in the UK by 
Frontier Software, who sell them for £29.95 each or, as 
reviewed here, in a special combined package for a very 
reasonable £49.95, 

SpartaDOS is an advanced Disk Operating System for use on 
Atari 8-bit machines. In fact, it's a whole family of DOS 
programs bundled together in a package known as the 
SpartaDOS Constructinn Set. Its name is derived from the way 
you can build a system disk containing a version of SpartaDOS 
appropriate to your purposes and hardware configuration. 

The package includes two 5.25" disks containing all the 
software, a comprehensive 161 page instruction manual, plus a 
36 page supplement covering SpartaDOS V3.2, the latest 
version, The combined package also contains the US Doubler 
chip set, 

FREE GAMES AND DEMO's! 

The first disk contains four different versions of SpartaDOS 
VI .1 plus its command utility files, These may be used with any 
8-bit machine having 24K or more of memory. They're not 
directly compatible with Atari DOS 2.0 2.5, but the powerful 
copy utility provided can convert tiles from Atari DOS to 
SpartaDOS format and vice-versa. The four versions include 
the standard DOS with and without US Doubler high speed 
support and two cut down versions for use simply as game 
loaders or with AUTORUNSYS files and cartridges. 

Side B of the disk contains a working sample of the 
SpartaDOS binary file loader menu. Included with it are a set 
of seven really good public domain games, and three spectacular 
graphics demonstration programs -a nice bonus. 

The second disk contains SpartaDOS V3.2 and two different 
flavours of V2.3. These versions will only run on XL.'XE 
machines with 64K or more, and have a built-in Atari DOS 
2.0/2.5 handler, making them directly compatible with Atari 
DOS files, 

V3.2 is Lhe latest version, including support for ICD's 
R-Time 8 realtime clock cartridge, BASIC XE, and hard disks 
amongst other things. The only difference between the two 
V2.3 h s is that at boot -up one gives priority to any installed 
cartridge software, while the other gives priority to SpartaDOS. 
Between them, all these different versions should cover virtually 
any requirement- you just have to decide which one is most 
relevant to your needs. 




Double the density ... twice the 
speed ... worth the price? 



EXPANDABLE SYSTEM 

SpartaDOS provides you with vastly improved facilities in a 
number of different areas. Firstly, it gives additional features 
not found in Atari DOS such as use of volume labels, 
sub-directories (like ST folders), time and date stamping of 
files, command files, batch hies, and keyboard buffering. It's got 
45 extra commands - over and above the equivalents of Atari 
DOS menu items. And if you still feel SpartaDOS is missing 
something, the command file facility allows you to expand the 
system by writing your own commands. 

Secondly, it improves on facilities provided in Atari DOS 
with such features as handling up to 8 disk drives, expanded 
capacity directories, locking at disk level as well as file level, and 
an excellent way of tagging files for copying as a batch instead of 
handling each one individually - a great time saver. 

Thirdly, it provides support lor virtually all types of disk 
drives in single (90K), 1050 enhanced (127K), true double 
density (180K), and even hard disks via the Supra hard disk 
interface. It handles RAMdisks too, and not only on the 
130XB. When using BASIC on any XL, XE it will use the BK 
of RAM under the BASIC ROM as a small RAMdisk 

Finally, it complements ICD's US Doubler hardware 
modification for the 1050 disk drive, giving true double density 
capability (180K per side) and a spectacular increase in speed. 

Incredibly, even with all these additional facilities it gives you 
MORE free memory for BASIC programs than Atari DOS! 
This wizardry is achieved by holding some of (he code in the 
memory under the OS ROM- How about ihat for efficient use 
of resources! 



26 l'agc 6 - Issue 32 



STORT SOFT 

MAIL ORDER SPECIALISTS 



Special purchase of Certified & Guaranteed Bankrupt Stock 
100 DS/DD4STPI Discs 

£29.95 

Inc Sleeves. Labels. Write protect. 
Limited offer while supplies last. 

ALL DISCS CARRY A NO QUIBBLE REPLACEMENT GUARANTEE, ARE 
CERTIFIED 100% ERROR FREE AND COME WITH LABELS, 5 k" ALSO HAVE 
SLEEVES AND WRITE PROTECTS. FLIP SIDED DISCS HAVE TWO INDEX 
HOLES AND TWO NOTCHES 



3! SSHTP5J5 

so Siuip-srj 
100 JJilTniil 
IS KMTM5 75 
SB D5IBTP15JS 
IBDDS qirPllli 



SPECIAL OFFER " 

n-scs i lrn cup menu.: 31 el idk 
MiCS ft 1H CM Lfltmtlt OllC l(H 
DISCS 1 1IH tW LKNMC USE BOX 
DISCS 1 1 Id CUP IQCKMtC Dlir BDK 
DISCS 1 1?B CUP LDCKI«C DISC IDK 
DISCS t ItS CAP IDCIPM DISC 101 



Si DISCS FROM AS LITTLE AS 33 PENCE 



BLANKS 1/4' DISCS 



IIISHlO'iHfBFB!! MITri [ACH lllll Dl5.CS PLiHtHAJIO 



UM'thOIC 
Silt l« 
»1'K 



TRIAL ID 
fJLC' 

£6M 



li 

ihh: 

■ ■lit 



II 

til M 

■1 jC 
C3IU 



IUD 

LIJ JU 

ejToa 



EBKBF Tfc BRJLhDEn PBECISILH BS DO 4* TP» DISCS fii! 



D22Q33S3ZES1 



5 K1L3! ;o 
i i-nn"jii 



fTS 
FT* 



s: - KIDS l» 

FJ0--9Q iHfflOS BO V i. BO 3: 



in in ■ 

;iUa Til. lib CAli* 

HW 

it ill 
(1SL1 



rsas 



MJMHMJIM 



4" iBw fivic-fi r. i'jU m aoimics pnitrbP ilad 
si rn!s;)iMiB!w..LiCi 

S'lflTCH F:3i 7 P^ll Ch li- I fiiH(t in f iw^>ifii *i# wr, *#h| Ctniimt t 11 *E71? - pl««i »g*l#v 



PR 
f rant 



3.5" SPECIAL OFFERS 

25 SS/OD 135 TPIIMF1DDI & 80 or 60,90 locking disc bo* 
50 SS/DD 135 TPIIMF1D0I fi 80 or 60/90 locking disc box 
25 DS/DD 135 TPI(MFZDD) & B0 Of 60/90 locking di$c box 
50 OS/DD 135 TPKMF2DD) & 80 or 60/90 locking disc box 



13&r.niimt)riiKJt(l m 15 

S5/DDIMF1B0I £1000 £?« 00 

OS/DD (MF2DD) £1150 £27 09 

MiHl ST I M[feM*l« 

tuiu i meoi**"! 

Nn Mnn khu i f isns or ftnwh suph r mummc 



B0 



f*7 00 
£53 00 



ion 
£s:oo 

£98 UO 



BD0 



£399 



ATARI HARDWARE - BARGAIN PRICES 



i» sum £if9* 



■HjnsTw. ifs^L ntt*"m\ 

S?n SI* 5fll".l ntgifMi 

iJD ST« Sf Hi t $uhi w -mUr 

^JD 5T« 5FIHB.SM 1JS 

'0*0 51F P. SMIfi inn) mnn 

Ma;* (T j j 1 n*y£tfl« RAVI 1 I mag dst 

Mtji fT | J rr«ijia,ir HAW 1 i mag ami t SM I M 

Htj» t'H TmAriE UUUnn Urn) 

Uqitr |i rvgAplE UV A I i^rt.(^lf ; 



f32 0D 
{55 00 

{"35.00 
£6100 



ID 
in i em 

£14 9E 



1 1 ■ i>. 
f.12. » 



■TW5»S 

f ! ,'i 36 
[*JiK 

f:?o:« 

IKS* 
fMS» 
Lion OH 
[1130 00 



A i Kvdwvi urn Hilh liir Ai:l [mm' ill lit cent wlh S ai*u *"•" *«[ mlKL*g L7H tmuu md in acuta |H «w 
oil S UH*ilHiiuprHwjgLn( [' ruris, ; KtHim, (l,r> I'nniM i"^i' awJi'ltHiV Bill IXIOill* HIE jW nnuHi EiMSlM 



COMPUTER ACCESSORIES 



S,"CkSf qrjTCMfjH Mvn Jin IKUtilT Of i l.>|H U«l Hull 

CISC CILfiFJHIi Kilt I41H rm Aim rrm ■ pmlKr mi nfjifE hHwvi 

5, -COL f3*S Jl' 

SPfClil PHCE 

m:i:-.m SWIUM Piifut SCliJi EMM Hhw Hi And t Spii - [Jw is Hm-i 

MlU SI i! rn^l SA<UM» StiJJ* III **!)* Sprll 11 

UfCA FJ1 li ,i-j| SHlKMm M1..I1. E. Wll* Inn F-nln 1 

SHJK Hxd Dili Dint 



F3* 
ft* 



■ fBKDO" 

■f inn no" 



" fJBSJ no ■■ 



Jusl wrrl* (oi rnnre mlnirnalioii dwqulf: lit (llvafelr id STOAT SOFT \ InlRFnaiticmsl nrrlers add 10% and UMl ■ jietinLls Stwlinf ty Mr* draft or 

intfcwiiahonil monev order Wnlr Fw ljuoje hi any airier ciir>eiicyl 

ACCESS/ MftSTEHCflRD/EUROCARO' VISA Fccppfprl CftfQlT CflFffl QfDEfi LINE - 0?T9 B9509 
24 HQLRS A DAi. ? DAYS A WEEK vflT S PP INC ND HIQDEN (KTfiAS WHAT tOU S€i 

IS WHAT YOU PAY 

18 CROWN CLOSE, SHEERING, BISHOP'S STORTFORD, HERTS CM22 7NX 



COMMANDS OR MENU? 

SpaitaDOS is essentially a command driven DOSj and in use- 
it reminded me of IBM PC-DOS. If you don'i like using 
commands then you can invoke the SpartaDOS menu function. 

This is worlds away from The simple Aniri DOS idl-ru, but u 
can make things easier for you. 

You construct a SpartaDOS system disk by initialising it 
with the appropriate density and sector skew, and choosing die 
version uf SpariaDOS yuu want to use. Sector skew determines 
how the sectors are physically mapped out onto a disk track, 
and the US Dtiubkr requires a different skew fmm standard. 
US Doubler skewed disks will still work on an unmodified 
1050, but slower than usual. 



SpartaDOS can take advantage of them straight away. 

In practice, the US Doubler ard SpartaDOS worked 
together flawlessly, happily transferring data back and forth 
between disks of different densities and between Atari DOS 
and SpartaDOS disks. The US Doubler handled the switching 
between densities completely transparently - you don't even 
know it's happening! 

The US Doubler really makes itself felt when used with the 
high speed versions t)f SpartaDOS. The normal pedestrian 
bcep-beep-beep of IO'jO I/O is replaced with a frenzied torrent 
of beepery as the data screams to or from the 10"50 at three times 
normal speed. It's truly amazing! 

A NEW LEASE OF LIFE 



TWO CHIPS 

The US Doubler itself looks most unexciting, but its effect is 
anything but! h consists of just two chips which you fit onto the 
]050's circuit board, replacing the ones already there. In most 
cases you just unplug the old chips and insert the new ones 
however, Atari produced drives with two different types of 
chips } so if you have one of the less common types you also have 
to unsolder and rcsolder two jumper cables as part of the 
installation process. 

The most difficult part of the exercise is disassembling the 
drive to get to the board and reassembling it afterwards, for 
which you need nimble fingers. I CD provide excellent 
instructions, so most people should be able manage it without 
too much hassle. The whole job took me under an hour, but I 
didn't have any soldering to do. Once the chips are installed 



You'll hardly recognise your &-bit machine when used with 
these two products. It really will take on a new lease of life, 
gaining facilities, operating convenience and a performance 
sparkle you never thought possible. And they'll probably save 
you time and money too> particularly if you use a lot of disks. 

I have only two criticisms. It's difficult to find things in the 
highly detailed manuals as there's no index and the built-in 
time-of-day clock runs slow, presumably because it's designed 
for use in the USA with a 60Hz VBI. Frontier Software really 
should have fixed this before selling the product in the UK. 

In summary, if you're a disk user you'll benefit from 
SpartaDOS. If you're also a 1050 user, you can give your 
system a tremendous boost by using the combined 
SpartaDOS 'US Doubler package, These products represent 
unbeatable value and provide you with the ultimate DOS 
upgrade for your 8-bit machine. Buy them. • 



Page (S -Issue 32 27 







TUTORIAL SUBROUTINES 




5, 



DOS FUNCTIONS 
FROM BASIC 



For the fifth in this series I have chosen a rather longer 
subroutine which, I hope, will be very useful. Some of you will 
already have a 'Minidos' of some sort but those who are newer 
to Atari should find the technique interesting as it uses Basic's 
sped*! I O function XIO which is not mentioned in the Basic 
Reference Guide! 

This routine allows access to some of the functions of the 
Disk Operating System from Basic so you can carry out disk file 
manipulations without leaving your program. It may be 
appended to your program daring the development phase and 
then removed if it is no longer needed once the program is 
complete- If you arc ever stuck with a program to save and no 
formatted disk available this subroutine can be ENTERed into 
your program and used to format a disk. 



THE XIO FUNCTION 

The XIO function format is: 
XIO A,#B,C,D,Filespec 

A is the command number. We will be using 32 (rename), 33 
(delete), 35 (lock), 36 (unlock) and 254 (format ). Other available 
commands are 5 (get record), 7 (get character), 9 (put record), 
11 (put character), 12 (close), 13 (status request), 17 (draw line), 
18 (fill), 37 (note) and 38 (point). 

#B is the device number as used in an OPEN command. In 
most applications it is ignored but it must be included and must 
have a # sign. Do not use the number of an I/O channel which 
is already open. 

C and D are auxiliary control bytes. They are set to zero for 
most applications and we do not need to consider them for this 
routine. 

Filespec is the name of the file being operated on, or in the case 
of Rename the name of the old and new files with a "," 
separator. If it is typed in it must be in quotation marks but in 
the subroutine we will use a string variable for the file name. 

SUBROUTINE ANALYSIS 

Lines 31400 - 31470 are secondary subroutines called by the 
main subroutine which follows. These are adapted from the 
keyboard input subroutines in Issue 31 . The strange sei of 
conditions in line 31440 is designed to allow input of A-Z 0-9 
and also . , * and ? so that all file names including wild cards can 
be input. 

line 31480 - Enter the subroutine here, i.e. GOSUB to this 
line. This clears the screen, then checks the value of TT15. 
TT15 is zero if the subroutine is being run for the first time, 
otherwise it will have been set to 1 in line 31490 and line 31490 
is skipped to avoid an error through trying to dimension the 
variables a second time. 



Ian Finlayson continues his 
series with a longer routine for 
disk users that can be used as 
shown or expanded further 



Line 31490 - dimensions the variables needed in the subroutine 

and sets a trap to line 31500 for any I/O error during execution 

of the subroutine (such as a wrong file name). 

Line 31500 - The destination for trapped errors, provides a 

suitable re-entry into the program, an error message and 

resetting of the trap for further errors. 

Lines 31 5 10 - 31 540 get the directory from the disk and print it 

on the screen. 

Line 31550 - asks which function you wish to carry out and 

goes to the subroutine at 31400 for a single character input. 

Line 31560 - if C was selected (to change disks) a prompt is 

given to change the disk. The program then waits for a key 

press and returns to the start of the subroutine. 

Lines 31570- 31580 - If L or U were selected these lines are 

implemented otherwise the program skips to 31600. TT16 is 

the command number needed in the XIO function, for 

example, 35 for Lock and 36 for Unlock, A prompt is made for 

the filename and this is obtained from the subroutine at line 

31420. "D:" is added to the front of the file name and the 

program jumps to line 31710. 

Lines 31590 - 31610 - These lines carry out a similar routine 

for Renaming a file (Command No 32), but in this case the old 

filename is retrieved first and then the new name. The latter is 

appended to the former after a comma, so that TT1 IS is of the 

form D:oLdfile.ext, newfik.ext. The program then goes straight 

to the XIO function in line 31710, 

Lines 31620- 31640 are for Erase (Command number 33). As 

this is a destructive routine a prompt for a Y input is included 

to make doubly certain that it is intentional, then the program 

steps to 31480. 

Lines 31650 - 31670 - This is similar to the erase routine but 

for Format (Command 254), Again a cautionary- prompt is used. 

Line 31680 - if Q is selected we quit the subroutine and return 

to the main program. This is the only way out of this minidos 

subroutine. 

Line 31690 - if this line is reached then the original letter 

selected was not an active letter so the subroutine is started 

again, prompting for one of C,LjU,R,E,F or Q, 

Line 31 700 - this line is used by the Erase and Format 

selections to check for the Y response to the prompt. Any other 

key returns to the beginning of the subroutine. 



28, 



Page 6- lituc 12 






• 



«tr> IiJ-»t pen *» patt *> are 

"Hi ■ilKHHlllTIIlf TUIDOIAl. s ■»« 

•a KErBflaRG INPUT •" 

rr 3 1.4 Be PO«E 694.RLPOICF 7BI i t,i:IF PEEKCl 
6)>177 TttEH POKE. lt.lPEEKlfil U«) 

JL 31.116 OPEB ttZ,4,8, ,, K; ,, l*XT ItZ.TIlZ;-? C 
Hfi$CTTiJ) ICLOSF B2:BETltltll 

LU 11470 DPCH RZ j 4,8, "*f 1 " ! TT?S-"" IFOI Ttl 

1=1 10 12 
Ul J14JI POKE 7»!.H:Ctt K,ITM!IF Til 

4 l&Oj THEN PUP 1C0T0 11468 

U 11440 IF TT14<42 OR TT14>»8 OR TT14- 

43 DK TT14=4S OR TT14=47 DP TT14=64 OB 
CTT14>57 «ll> TT14<63> T*EN !H!B 

UN 314BB 7 CMRS(T114J j S I t *S 1 T T 1 1 , T T 1 3 ) - 

CrtP-SCTT14J !WEHT TT1J 

r» I14I.D IF TT*t="" THE* POP iClOVE H2SEO 

rn sitae 
DM 314 ra CLOSE aUPETUBH 

MT 11471 DEH "■ PflCit t. ***• 

W» -iLIBRfKiT T W! TUTORIAL j MM 
W DD5 rROH BASIC «HE 

IH 11488 r "* ,d :IF TI15 THEN 31519 

III 1I1I> PJM ITIt E12> ,TT10* (111 j I t US CI7J 

: I I 14-1 ; IRnP 31500; SOTO 31518 
CC 31S«ft * :» "UHMiJitVlil" ; " "PREIS ftNV HE 

V FOR BT1C CONTENT!" i IROF 51 S8 W ; lill tllf 

HL J1518 OPEN tll.6,EI J "P;#.«" 

UT IllZt INPUI nl,TTl»$:£F TT18S(.5.87 ="FH 

CE" THEN J154B 
it ivs.ni t i I LBS : Cor* J1S2« 

KM 31511 ClOSF HI CTT1»* = '"" 

NN 11SS8 ? :7 "Do you Wish "to "IT 'TWINGE 
MMS M l* "TJOCK, Uhidlk, CJEHAME. 9R*1F 

, i'JitPMQT CI rlKl IT' "j : GO MID iHOO 
Ofl J1S6B IF TTli-67 THEN T "CrtMKE THE DI 

SC THEN PPF^S. &NY KCWCO^UD 1111)1) 1 

D 1 1S1I 

«* J157* IF TTlfOas AMD IT1K171 THtN II 
53a:TTlB=33*(TT12=8SJ : ? II "ENTER FILE 
NAHE (no E>:) "jiGOSUB J14I0 

NT 315BR TT1* = J5+CTT1?=E>5> IT : » "EWTEN M 
LC HdME [no D:l ";;kOSUB 31418 : TT1 !•*■■ 
& : " : TT11SC3»=TT-»S:G0T0 31718 

HZ 3159* IF TTltOei THEM T1B20 

BK Z1BBB TTi*:lt!f :f "EMTtP OLO HAMT <nu 

8:1 "; ;t05UD .11470 :TTil*±"B; " :TTlllF(l 
)=TTM 
44 IltlB 7 II "tmtB MEH NAME (no III -Jl 
EdlUB ai4ie:TTlli(LCNClTllSi*li-" J "fTT 
II* flFNCTTllil *lJ-TT5S:tOTO 31718 
CM 31*18 IF TT11069 THEN 3145.8 
KU I1BII TIlt-I3:1 THIFS FILE TO [Rfl'il t 

without 0;) "::£0SUB I14J*: TT11S="D ;«s 

TTllt(I)±TI*t 

JF 31*48 1 :T "PHIS V TO EPA5E FILE ";TT 

usicnrn H7«» 
All 31184 rr TTiz<>7* THEN 31688 
GY 316S8 TT16=-I54HTll$= ,, P: ,, t? it "PRG3* 

Y TO FORMAT DI3C - ALL FILE* HILL B 
E LD4T" 

CJ 31671 GOTO 31784 

rx ni>oo if niz-ii intN TftAP 4*88t:RETUR 

hi 

r« iie^d corn line 

JC 31788 CftlllB UlBfllF III1IOB1 AND TT1 

tOlZl) THEM 11488 
CI 11 7 IB HID nio,ni F i,t, 1T11S :G0TD 11448 



Line 31710 - at last the XI O function! It operates as described 
above. Once the operation is complete the program returns to 
the start of the subroutine and displays the disk contents anew 
so that the change can be seen immediately. From there another 

operation tan be selected or Q to return to the main program, 

DEVELOPMENT 

This subroutine has been put together rather quickly and 
could, I'm sure, be compacted and improved. It was developed 
in this form to enable you to follow it easily. There are three 
obvious possibilities for development of the subroutine - first 
add more XIO functions, second improve the disk contents 
display to fit more files on the screen (see Issue 28) and third 
provide for multiple disk drive configurations. 

That's it for this issue. As always any comments or 
suggestions for other routines are welcome. Write to Ian 
Finlayson, 60, Roundstone Crescent, East Preston, West 
Sussex. * 



ATARI 520 STFM NOW IN STOCK 
FOR NEW PRICE ONLY £264.95 * 



CUMANA 1 MEG DISK DRIVE £129.95 



PHILIPS 8833 COLOUR MONITOR 

£249.95* 



ATARI 1040, ST BASIC, MOUSE AND 
MANUALS £379.95 



ATARI 520 STFM PACK INCLUDES 

ATARI BASIC MOUSE MANUALS 

£264.95 * 



ATARI 1040 PACK INCLUDES ST 
BASIC SM125 MONO MONITOR 
MOUSE AND MANUALS £459.95 * 



ST SOFTWARE AT GIVEAWAY PRICES 



Flight Sim II .. £37,95 

Knight Hawk.. £14.95 

Arctic Fo* £14.9 j 

Music Contrition Sei . . „ E18.7S 

Bird* Tale. £18,75 

Galo , , , . . £19.95 

Eaglet Ne*t £14.95 

Flip Side . E6.9S 

Terrspodi. ...... ....... £18.75 

Centinei . ..£14.95 

Chs»t Msil*r 2000. . , E1S.76 

Sky F«t _ E14.9S 

Art Director . __ £39.95 

Fnnlns,- III. ... _. £16-75 

Borbiuiti. , .£15,75 

Mud Pie*. ....... . .£5.95 

Indians Jon** .... £14.95 

Trivial Purtuili . .... £18.50 

Impact . .._._. E 11.50 

Bar's trim iPnlace). E 12.95 

Rama Rami . _ _ ^ £14,95 

Timetjlisl. ._._..._.. £7.50 
PMoi. . . _E7,S0 



Delendftr of I he Crown. . . £22,95 

Star Trek _. £16.95 

Backlash E 16.95 

Hunt for Hud October. £19-95 

Stif Wara. .___.. _EK-&5 

Blu* War .£16.95 

Marbia Madras .... .£16.95 

Tangle weed. £16.95 

Kin^s QumI Triple Pack . _ £19.95 

Gauntlet II . . .£19.95 

Sola man* Key. ._...__ £16.95 

Pro Sound Designer. . £41.95 

Perfect Matt;fi_ ........ £8-55 

Side Wart, . .-- E 15,95 

Station Fill . _ .£19.95 

MoMville. Manor , _ £15 .95 

TaiPan _. _ £14.95 

Missing One Druid. . . £7.95 

3D Gefa* . ... £14.95 

Super Conductor ., £42.95 

Wirhill . . ..£19 95 

Shyraider. _ ...... C 16-95 

Jlnxt*r__ . E1&.95 

Eco_ - - .£16,95 



ST FAST BASIC £32.9V 



DEGAS ELITE 



E1S.9S" 



SPECIAL OFFER 
First Word + 



£57.95 



SPECIAL OFFER 
Superban? Pergonal 



£69.95* 



♦ CASH ONLY PRICE 



10 
£10.95 



BLANK DISCS 

20 50 

£21.50 £49.95 

Trade enquiries welcome 



100 
£97.00 



Lockable disc boxes 3.5" holds SO ES.9B 



Spend over f SO on Software and gel a Free Calculator 



SOtTftD N VISION 

11 Silk Slreet Leigh Lanes WN7 1AW 
Phone now for delails - Tel: (0942) 673683 
Cheques and P/Ordere payable to: Sound N Vision PSF/VAt included. 
Visitors welcome rn showroom. S*nd $AE for price list. 



Pajfc 6 — Issue 32 



» 



Viewpoint 




DO YOU NEED A 
16-BIT COMPUTER? 

Phil Cardwell raises a few 
controversial points 



Whilst browsing around the 19B7 PCW Show, looking at the 
latest hatch of ST software, a startling thought entered my 
mind 'Do I need a 16-bit computer?'. This thought preyed on 
my mind, almost converting a dedicated H-bit fan to the way of 
the ST! After a great deal of deliberation I made my decision, to 
be revealed later, but for now I'll go over the factors that were 
given due consideration. 

Price of a set-up was an initial factor. This works out about 
equal, though bargain hunters could make the 130XE and a 
1050 disk drive a winner hands down. The cost of a 520 STFM 
constantly being brought down as dealers fight for trade, and 
the XE price increase by Atari, made this a very marginal 
argument. It could also prove the point that Atari want to give 
the 8-bit side less commitment and the ST's more support. 

The 'Power without the Price" slogan brings us to the speed 
and power concept. There have been a lot of myths about the 
ST's operational speed, so lets have some facts. Theoretically? 
the ST should execute programs between 5 and 20 times faster 
than an 8-bit, dependant on the application being run. Without 
getting too technical, speed depends on the language being used 
and how well that language is implemented. As an example ST 
LOGO runs at approximately the same speed as. 8- bit LOGO! 
Given that most people are BASIC programmers, lets clear the 
air in that department. With the exceptions' of complex 
calculations and considerable disk Input Output operations, ST 
Basic is no more than 25% faster than public domain 
Turbo-Basic or OSS's Basic XL XE. 

BETTER GRAPHICS? 

How about the theories that the ST's can run larger 
programs? True? but can you imagine the limitations of a 1 meg 
XE? It could be done. Then there is the one about the ST's 
capability to display better graphics. False. Everyone thought 
that the demo's that were displayed on the ST's public debut, 
were, to say the least, fantastic. These demo's encouraged some 
6502 programmers to show the Atari community that the 8-bit 
computers can produce graphic displays that match the quality 
of the ST's. Evidence of this is found on PAGB 6 Library Disk 
#42 - Special Demos, which contains exact replicas of the ST 
demo's - one is even an improved version! Also on the graphics 
topic, we can't forget the fanatics who arc looking for the 
ultimate 1 games machine. To them, I have only one thing to 
say: I have yet to see an ST game that can satisfy me as much as 
level 63 on Rescue on Fractalus! Sound played a minor role in 
my decision. The ST's supposedly 'lousy' sound chip does 
match POKEY, and having heard digitised music on both 
machines I decided to ignore this factor! 

These points don't mean thai everyone should rush out and 
purchase an 8-bit system. I am simply doubting whether people 
can benefit from the, as yet, unrealised capabilities of the ST. 
And even when that full potential becomes reality, how many 




Not necessary? 

users will need more power than can be obtained from an XE? 
Business, scientific, technical users, etc., will need the extra 
speed and power, but can you justify the extra expense if all you 
do is write a couple of letters each month and keep track of your 
personal finances. With 512/1 024K are you writing a letter or 
your biography? 

HOW EASY TO PROGRAM? 

Down to the nitty-gritty from the would be programmers 
point of view. How easy is to program the computers? Atari 
BASIC is straightforward, switch on and its there, but with ST 
BASIC you have to learn (or should that be master?) the GEM 
environment, to load and use BASIC to the full, Do you need 
multiple pop down menus to write a program? What about 
actually writing programs? Without graphics, programs can be 
written with relative ease on both machines. With simple 
graphics, it's the same case, a snip on both computers. Moving 
sprites? The beginner would find it slightly difficult on the 
Kbit, but then again, it's nearly impossible on the ST, 
Somehow the XL XE won this round 

WHAT PRICE SOFTWARE? 

Software was a hard battle. Do I fork out in excess of £25 for 
an ST title from my local W.H. Smiths or do 1 gamble a £1 
cheque with the Po&t Office, for a mail order 8-bii title because 
W.H, Smiths don't think it would sell if they did stock it. 
Thought was also given to the price I would have to pay for a 
blank disk and disk boxes, but with 'disk wars' continuing 
between the big distributors, 1 am keeping an open mind on 
this item. 

THE FINAL DECISION 

Anyway my final decision? To stick with my faithful H00 XL, 
For now an 8-bit system is more than adequate. I may change 
in years to come when the ST is more firmly established and the 
majority of the 'fast buck' dealers have gone, but at this moment 
in time, I for one do not need in excess of 512K to write a letter 
or keep track of my cheque book. An interesting foot-note is 
whether I have touched an open nerve in the ST camp? Will 
they sit back and sulk, knowing I'm right, or will they write in 
trying to add more controversy? Wc shall have to wait and see 



30 



Page 6 — Issue 11 







go 




00 




ON 




l-H 




^H 




M 




u 




Ui 




< 




r 




y 




14 




d 




s 




The PAGE 6 ST section 







by M.S Rogers 



TURBO DIZER 




Low in cost - high in quality 



ST SECRETS 

Programming the graphics 














MONITOR 
SWITCHES 

Which to choose? 














PC DITTO 

Does it work? 





OR 



4 ► 



COMPUTERS , - 

Alan 520STFM i ,-.,t [ I CH> *orlh d1 soli* and 

C2S5.00 

s:?55 DO 

C355 00 

£496.00 

£999.00 

£1299.00 



accessory 

Afan b20STM - Mouse 

Atari 52CSTM i Mouse i SF3£4 Drive 

Alan 1040STF 

Alan Mega ST? 

A1a/i Mega 5T4 

- Meg3 ST 3 come curnpjleie with SM125 H»gli Res Mono 

WoniiLir §nd Nc* inc lude Blilie* Chips' 



MONITORS . 

Aran SM- 1 26 Mono 1 2 ' screen 
Atari SM-i 26 Bought erth Compute* 
Philips CM 8A33 M«d Res Colour H' ni 

DISK DRIVES 



[125 00 
[100 00 
CTB5CH 



Atari SF354 5mB Disk Drive 
AlariSF314 1iiiti Disk Drive 
Cumana 1n* Disk Dnwe 


cw.oo 

1-189 00 
[143 00 
E255 0Q 


Cumana 5 35' Disk Diwe 
ACCESSORIES 


[169 00 


10 ' 3.5 SS.'DD &9ka Branded 
10 ' 3 S SS'DD Di3*S Unbranded 
10 " 3 5 DS.'DD Disks Branded 
10 " 3 5 DS.'DD Disks U*itjrnnded 
Mouse Mat 

PRINTERS _ . 


E14.B9 
E 1 2 00 
[1995 
[16 00 
£4.95 



eiee.ce 

£t 99.00 
£19000 
£275.00 
£275 00 
E6S4 00 
CS73.8S 



Citizen 120-D 
Citizen LSP-10 
Epson LX-BQO 
SlarNU 10 

StSf NBZ4-10 printer 1 ShMl Feed 

Juki S520 Colour Printer 

All ou* software is marked at 1he recommended retail p* ice but 
ive give discount at 6% for AcorarVig* sales qi a lull 10% 
C'Sonuni For payment by Cash or Cheque 



Atari 1040STF 




20 BEST AT A.H I ST GAMES . 

1 Star Tre* 

2 Slar Wars 

3 Barbarian Ipalace) 

4 Deletion ol rne Crown 
blerroipods. 

e BaitiBrtan (psygnosisl. 
7 Flight Simulator 2 
B Gaunilei 
9AjrbaM 

10 Mercenary 

1 1 MarWe Madness 

1 2 Mission Elevalor 

13 Hunl lor Fwj October 

14 Leaderboiinl 
1 5- Impact 

16 Sentinel 

17 Solomons Key 

1 8 GglrJrurmar 

19 Metrocross 

20 Iriernaiional Karate 



10 BEST ATAPtl ST ADVENTURES 

1 Pnamasie III 

2 Tne Pawn 

3 The Bands Tale 

4 The Gudd or Thieves 

5 Nord & Bert 

-6 Gnome Ranger 
7 SpaW Quesl 
B KnigrH Or'C 

9 Plundered Hearts 

10 221 B Baker Sli*« 



10 BEST ATARI ST BUSINESS PROGRAMS , 

1 F«rs1 Word Plus 

2 VIP Prolesstqnal 

3 Sage Accountant Plus 

4 Superbase Personal 

5 Tnmbase 

6 Publishing Partner 

7 K-Spread 2 
6 Tempus 

9 Habaview 

10 K-Data 

ID BEST ATARI ST UTILITY PROGRAMS — 

1 Dsgas Elite 

2 Laities C 

3 Typesetter Eld* 
A M Oreclor 

6 PC Ditto 

6 Pro Sound Designer 

7 Professional Icon Editor 
B Cad 3D 

9 Easy Draw 2 . . . 

10 Back Pack 



[19 9-5 
[19 96 
£14 99 
£29-95 

[24 95 
E24 95 
[49.95 

[;S4.39 
E24 95- 
[24 95 
£24 95 
[19 99 
£24 95 
£24 95 
[14 95 
C1995 
[1999 
[24 95 
£24 95 
Ci&.SS 




£24 95 
E24 95 
E24 95 
[24 95 
[29 95 
[1495 
f2*96 
; 19.16 
£24 95 
£24.95 



£79 95 

E220 85 

E22B 85 

£99 95 

EB9 95 

£159.65 

£79.95 

E29.95 

£74.95 

[49 96 



£24 95 
£99 9* 
£34.95 
£49.09 

[79 $5 
[57 44 
£29 95 
£24 95 

£49.95 



The Future Present 






From Atari. At YORCOM. 



::u::::-' ■;■:- ■ 



■.-.;:::::■■•■■■■■-■■■■ ^'■'■'- '■'■'-.:.: ::::■ ••■•-•■[■ ■'■'■ UsI"-:::: : ^i-i*.: :::::::: :■>:■.■.■.■■.■ ■ ■ ■ ■ < ■'■■'■ '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. ?.■-■■■:■, 



OPE N 9AM TO 5 30PM MONDAY ■ SATURDAY 
MAIL ORDER & CREDIT CARDS WELCOME 



Klwra 



THE YORK COMPUTER CENTRE 




■ ■■■'.....ay? ■■ .-:•: 



::■■::: J,';;,r,V®»,',',:- 



32 Page 6 - Issue 



i2 THE YORK COMPUTER CENTKt 9 Chvygare Centre York Yl!l 2SII Tckephunc (0904) 641862 




Mirror-soft has recently signed an agreement with Cinemawiare 
Corporation Go distribute the next six titles in the Cinemaware 
Interactive fiction 1 line, The first four titles from Cincnmware 
we also distributed by Mirrorsoft and include the best-selling 
DEFENDER OF THE CROWN as well as SDI, THE KING 
OF CHICAGO AND SIN BAD AND THE THRONE OF 
THE FALCON. New titles to be released under the agreement 
include THE THREE STOOGES, a comedy classic with 
arcade action and a laugh -a -minute storyline, and ROCKET 
RANGER based on an American TV serial to bring action, 
romance, thrills and spills to your computer. Cinemaware claim 
' L thcre is nothing quite like it, graphically or artistically, in the 
industry today". 

Ac ti vision's recent releases include PREDATOR based on 
the successful Arnold Schwarzeneggar film in which you play 
the pan of the film's hem, atone in a treacherous jungle needing 
every ounce of cunning to stay alive. Although starting out with 
plenty of firepower in the form of automatic machine guns, 
grenade launchers and the deadly Mini-gun, you have to 
survive at the end with just your own physical strength and 
lightning reactions. Activision claim 'state of the art graphics, 
dual speed sideways scrolling and endless screens of pure arcade 
action', You can see for yourself for £19.95! 

Atari has finally got its Desktop Publishing act together, 
after months of speculation, by choosing Mirrossoft's Fleet 
Street Publisher as the software for its Desktop Publishing 
system. The system, now available from Atari dealers includes a 
Mega ST2 or 4, monochrome monitor, 1 or 20 Mb hard drive, 
Atari laser printer, Fleet Street Publisher and 1st Word. The 
entire system will cost between £2000 and £3000 depending on 
the configuration chosen and undercuts the Macintosh by a 
substantial amount. An Apple LaserWriter alone will cost more 
than the entire Atari system! 

Jeff Minterof Llamasoft looks to have finally stopped playing 
with Colourspace 1 1 and got down to finishing the program 
which is due for imminent release under the new title 
TRIP-A-TRON. Originally intended as an upgraded version 
of Colourspace 1, the program has now beer completely 
rewritten from scratch with the result that it is almost a new 
concept in interactive computer graphics. Jeff Mimer claims 
that TR1P-A-TRON is as far away from Colourspace 1 as the 
ST is from the ZX8IJ All you need Go enjoy the ultimate light 
synthesiser experience is a 52QST and around £40 but if you 
just happen to have FIVE MEGA ST's you can also join in the 
fun! The specification runs to a full A4 page so we don't have 
enough room to bring it all to you but if you would like to get in 
touch with Llamasoft on 07356 4478 wc are sure they will give 
you more information, 

bfocoms latest for the ST is SHERLOCK:THE RIDDLE 
OF THE CROWN JEWELS which, as you might have 
guessed is a detective story. Do you fancy playing Sherlock 
Holmes? Well, hard luck, for in this one you play Watson who 
has to solve the mystery of the theft of the Crown Jewels two 
days before the Queens Jubilee celebrations. You must pit your 
wits against a clever thief with only a trail of infuriating riddles 
left behind to aid in your search. One such riddle is why the 
game is called SHERLOCK ... ? If you play Watson, what is 
Holmes doing? Playing the fiddle? Or maybe he has just had a 
heavy night smoking those naughty substances that rumour has 
it he enjoys! 



Precision Software have released the upgraded version of its 
successful database Super base Personal. SUPERBASE 
PROFESSIONAL includes all of the features of its 
predecessor but includes full programming facilities to enable 
users to produce databases specifically suited to their needs. A 
unique forms editor is included which allows the creation of 
multi-page forms combining colour, lines, boxes and fields from 
any file for custom applications. The inbuilt Database 
Management Language allows even the nun -programmer to 
create custom routines and even pull-down menus and 
personalised pop-up selection panels are available. 
SUPERBASE PROFESSIONAL retails at £249.95 and is 
available from your usual supplier. 

Microdeal are taking a little more time nowadays with their 
releases. Tanglewood has set a standard which will hard to 
match and it seems that their programmers keep wanting to 
improve the games so that titles like LEATHERNECK and 
INTERNATIONAL SOCCER shown at last November's 
Atari Show are still awaited in *88. Other releases planned 
include SLAYGON which features the most sophisticated 
robot ever created, Slaygon has the strength of a hundred men, 
the armour and weapons of a small tank and the intelligence of 
... you! OMEGA RUN is a strategy game of which nothing 
more is known at present and there is also FRIGHT NIGHT, 
an 'Adult Only' game based on the film. This one could 
frighten you off the ST forever! 




And the rest ,„ 

System 3 have re-released INTERNATIONAL KARATE at 

a new lower price of £14, 99. Origin Systems, via Microprose, 
also have a martial arts game, MOEBIL'S, at £24-95 where 
fighting skills are combined with cunning, ingenuity and a 
knowledge of magic to achieve the objective of retrieving the 
'celestial orb of harmony'. Prospero Software have Version 
2.1 of PROSPERO FORTRAN for GEM now available with 
three superb manuals and many enhancements at £1 13 plus 
VAT. Mirrorsoft have a new game called TETRIS (actually 
the R is the other way round but do you know how difficult that 
is to explain to a typesetter?) which sounds rather weird, All 
about matching shapes. If you get really good, you might even 
get to win the competition in the pack and get sent to Russia! 
Epyjt games freaks might like to enjoy one of the current 
bargains on the ST entitled EPYX ON ST - b disks for £29.99 
containing four games, Championship Wrestling, World 
Games:, Winter Games and Super Cycle. A new label from 
Ariolasoft is MAGIC BYTES whose first release is 
PARANOIA where you are in a world controlled completely 
by computer, reminiscent of Orwell's 1984. Also due is 
VAMPIRES EMPIRE a fast and furious arcade strategy 
game set in the world of Count Dracula. * 



Page 6 - I«sue 32 J3 



PROSPERO FORTRAN 

Matthew Jones takes a look at 
the latest version of this language 



Since my review in 1 986 of Prospero 
Fortran 77, Prospero have continued to 
upgrade the product, and have recently 
released a major new version of the 
compiler (now called Prospero Fortran 
far GEM). The compiler still compiles 
the full ANSI standard, but now 
includes a number of Prospero 
extensions to make it even more usable 
(many also available in other compilers). 
The most significant improvement 
however, is that of putting the compiler 
into a complete programming 
environment - the workbench, 

THE WORKBENCH 

A programming session with a normal 
compiler is done by loading an editor, 
loading the file to edit, editing it, saving, 
exiting and loading the compiler. The 
compiler reads the file, compiles it, 
exits j then you load the linker. It reads 
the compiled file (the object file), links 
it, exits, then you load the program^ test 
it, then go back to the beginning to edit 
again. Tedious, but the way everyone 
works, Prosper a, however, now has a 
better way. 

After loading the Workbench, you 
select the 'Edit .FOR file' from the 
menu (or Alt E), and load the source 
file. The editor is a Wordstar key 
compatible editor with a few additions 
and is very easy to use, being one of the 
best I have found so far, though rather 
slow to update the screen. Make your 
changes, and then select 'Compile and 
Link' from the menu. The compiler 
comes into play, reading the file directly 
from memory. Compilation progress 
and errors are reported in a dialog, with 
an erroneous source line displayed for 
context and an option to Continue or 
Abort, After compilation (which can be 
separate), the linker is invoked which 
reads the object and library files, writing 
the finished program to the disk. Select 
the menu option for "Run 1 , and you can 
test it. When complete, you simply exit 
your program, the workbench 
re-appears, and you edit the source 
again to start another much speeded -up 
cycle. As a superb bonus, Prospero 
include a source -level debugger called 
Probe, which allows you to step through 



your program one line at a time, each 
time seeing the source line, viewing and 
altering the variables by name - with no 
need to know assembly. 

The whole system works very well, 
much better than even the best 'shell' 
programs like Metacomcos' MENU + . 
The drawback of course is that you 
cannot use your own editor, but the 
Prospero editor is quite adequate. It is 
still possible to edit non-Fortran files - 
indeed with multiple file programs it is 
necessary to edit a linker control file, I 
experimented with interfacing 
assembler to the Fortran, and had no 
problems editing the ASM file. To 
make such things even easier, you can 
run other programs from within the 
workbench, so I was able to run the 
assembler, then link normally. 

PROBLEMS 

Last time I reviewed Pro-Fortran, I 
tried out a 16,000 line program called 
COPE on it, and found that because of 
the strict adherence to the standard, and 
our sloppy programming, I could not 
get it to compile without major changes. 
I tried again this time with the latest 
version, and due to the extensions, was 
able to compile every thing with under 
ten corrections (half of which were bugs 
waiting to be found!). Because of the 
size of the source, compiling each file 
one by one (even using the compile from 
disk facility) was very slow. Some sort of 
batch mode (MAKE?) would be a 
perfect solution. Also due to the size (I 
think) I was unable to link it all, but 
GST Link managed to. 



I also had problems when the 
compiler or linker found errors, 95% of 
the time all was okay, and the 
'Continue' option worked, but every so 
often it crashed. I soon got into the 
habit of pressing ALT-S to save my 
source (but still leaving it in memory for 
editing) before starting to compile. 

THE MANUAL 

The manual is very good, and comes 
as three ring bound volumes in an A5 
box. The first volume covers the 
compiler installation and use, aspects 
about this particular implementation, 
and a complete language reference. 
While it could give more detail in 
certain more technical areas, it covers 
everything very well, and is a good 
example of what a manual should be 
like. The main dislike is the lack of 
further explanation to the error 
messages - the manual just repeats the 
compilers text - very helpful! 

The second and third volumes cover 
the GEM interface in superb detail. 
They are not just the simple repeat of 
the DRI documentation, but actually 
explain things, not to absolute beginner 
level, but enough for a technical user. 
Because the Fortran is available for the 
IBM PC, it also covers GEM version 2, 
and is the best reference I have seen. 

CONCLUSION 

Despite the tendency to crash every 
so often, I have found Prospero Fortran 
for GEM to be a very enjoyable 
program to work with, and very 
powerful as a development system with 
the source level debugger. If you use 
Fortran, this is a program worth the 
money and worth having I only wish ( 
could use the workbench with other 
languages too! 

Prospero Fortran for GEM costs £113 
plus VAT and is available for both Atari 
ST and MS-DOS machines. 




J4 Page 6 - Insuf J2 



THE SERIOUS ST 



MACRO 
ASSEMBLER 

V.ll.l 

Metacomco 

£49.95 

Reviewed by 
Ma tthewjon es 



Since I ftrsi reviewed the Metacomco 
Macro Assembler; it has not changed 
drastically in its basic functionality, but 
overall it is now streets ahead. The first 
version included only an editor, the 
GST linker, and the assembler. In the 
new version, the linker has not changed 
at all but the editor is a GEM based 
editor (as discussed in my C review), 
and the assembler is much faster in 
operation. What really improves the 
new package, however, are the included 
program development tools now 
standard in Metacomco languages: 
MENU+ the GEM based 'shell' (for 
managing the programming cycle); 
MAKE the large program management 
and maintenance utility (a true UNIX 
style MAKE); DEBUG + the symbolic 
link-loading debugger; and Kumas' 
Resource editor - for editing OEM 
resource files. Also included is a GEM 
library to link with for access to GEM 
functions. 

The assembler is a full macro 
assembler, suitable for writing large 
stand-alone applications or for 
interfacing with high-level languages. In 
use, it is a standard 'big system.' 
assembler, reading a source file and 
outpuEiing an object file - there is no 
interactive mode where you 
edit assemble run in memory - but for 
serious programming work this is 
acceptable, As well as small pure 68000 
programs s I have used the assembler to 



write special 63000 code for both the 

Lattice C compiler and the Prospero 
Fortran, and have had no problems 
linking. 

The assembler has a full range of 
options, and can produce full listings 
and cross references, It can output 
object code suitable for either the GST 
linker or the LINK68 linker (not 
supplied). 

The manual is three quarters of an 
inch thick, and covers each program 
supplied. The adverts describe the 
manual as 'with tutorials', but this does 
not include all parts, and sadly the 
assembler is one that lacks a tutorial. I 
have always found assembler manuals to 
be very unforthcoming - ihey may tell 
you everything but they are very 
'concise', so if you have no idea as to 
WHY you would want to do something 5 
knowing how to do it does not help. 
Such a tutorial may border on 68OG0 
code, but I would have liked more 
information on such subjects as 'which 
instructions and pMiedo-ops cannot be 
used in order to produce 
position-independent code rather than 
relocatable?'. Why can't this be included 
- and why not say what the difference is 
for those not familiar (me first!). This is 
not unique to Metacomco though - 
most (if not all) assembler manuals are 
like this and general books do not help 
because they tend to say 'refer to your 
manual for detail'. 

If you need an assembler then the 
extras provided with this one (which all 
work with other languages too) make it a 
very good buy. The assembler is very 
suitable for professional use (despite a 
slightly archaic command line format) . 
and I can certainly recommend it. * 



JACKMAKE 

Vogler Software 
£29.95 



Reviewed by 
Matthew Jones 



A traditional \WAKE' program is a 
tool for programmers of large programs 
to help them with the job of 
compilation. Basically, MAKE uses a 
'makefile' to tell it about a program, and 
how each file of the program depends on 
others. After editing a number of files, 
MAKE looks at the makefile and then at 
the edited source, discovers what is out 
of date and re-compiles and re-links as 
necessary. Thus the programmer does 
not have to type lots of commands after 
editing. 

JackxWake is not that sort of program 
what it does is simply run each program 
in a list you prepare. While it could be 
used for the production of a single 
source file program, it is not really 
aimed at the programmer but is perfect 
for performing frequently done, and 
possibly complicated, command 
sequences. You can specify a command 
line to give to the program if desired. If 
you do a lot of switching between 
programs, such as between a 
spreadsheet and a graphing utility, you 
can use JackMake to do the tedious bit 
for you. 

Preparing a new command list is very 
easy. First, select the menu option to 
clear the current list, then select 'Add a 
file' (also on a Ctrl key), and this gives a 
modified file selector, which enables you 
to *show' JackMake where [he program 
resides. The program does not have to 
be in any particular folder or disk drive. 
After selection the command is shown in 



r 




BRANDNLW 
TOP QUALITY 



Dm 

COMPUTER 

• Unit A Slannets ■ 

* Lamdon Worth Trade Centre • 

* Basildon ■ Essex ■ 

•SS15&DJ- 

•0268 541212- 

**l <* Vm QEQZED] Group 



BRANDED 

3.5" DISKS 

GUARANTEED FOR LIFE! 
Phone our Orderfine "FREE* 

0800 581 742 




SONY 





/ 



10 Single Sided Disks 

£12.95 

10 Double Sided Disks £16.95 

Please add £1 per order P&P. 



Page 6 - Issue 32 IS 



a window. This is then repeated for each 
program in the sequence. To add a 
command line, you must click on the 
command in the window, select a menu 
option, and then fill in a (quite small) 
line in a dialog. A nice feature is a 
button which says 'file selector'. 
Clicking this reveals the file selector and 
allows you to select a data file for the 
command line. Unfortunately, usin.L: 
this deletes any command entered so far, 
so you can only use it once per 
command line. I would have preferred 
to be automatically offered a command 
line for each command added. The 
parameters are not shown in the 
window, and JackMake takes no 
consideration of the command type 
when running it, not clearing the screen 
prior to running a TOS program. 

Once the list is prepared (you can save 
lists for re-use), you can choose a few 
aspects about its use. You can specify 
how many times the list will be 
repeated, or have it repeat forever. You 
can also detennine whether it will show 
you a dialog informing you of actions it 
is about to take. This dialog gives three 
options: Okay (run the program) , Skip, 
and Stop- 1 f you have selected to not 
have the dialog and also the repeat 
forever option, it is still possible to 
interrupt the sequence with a key 
combination as JackMake loads the next 
program- 

The manual, laudably printed on 
re-cycled paper (with two page 
explanation), is not particularly 
comprehensible. Along with the 
confusion of calling itself a 'MAKE' 
utility and then not actually being a true 
MAKE', I had a struggle 
understanding quite what the purpose 
of the program was, or how to use it and 
was only enlightened once I ran the 
program itself- Fortunately, once you 
understand what it is trying to do, 
JackMake is good in use, so the manual 
is not too much of a hindrance - more a 
drawback to selling it. 

Other niggles with the program 
include bad spelling and also 
non-standard dialogs, For instance, the 
'Preferences* dialog does not have 
OKAY and Cancel buttons - you have 
to click on the dialog title to exit! 

Overall, this program could save you 
a lot of time if you often run a sequence 
of programs repeatedly (especially from 
different folders), otherwise it would 
appear to have no particular use. 4 



QUICK-LIST ST 

AB Software 
£4.99 



Reviewed by 
Ma tthe w Jones. 

Some time ago I reviewed Michurons 1 
Super Directory program. Quick-List is 
another program designed to fulfill the 
same purpose, thai of organising your 
disk library and allowing you to find a 
file easily. As Quick-List is so cheap (at 
only £4.99} it has to be looked at - but 
how does it stand up? 

Quick- List does not use the whole 
GEM interface. It has no menus, but a 
third of the screen is filled with icons 
that are used to select the programs' 
functions. The icons are very detailed 
(in monochrome mode) and 
understandable and the screen has a 
pleasant layout generally. The program 
has built-in help screens ( no-man ual 
due to cost) to explain the icons if you 
need it - though using it causes the loss 
of your file data and it would be better 
without this problem, The colour 
version is quite different, using different 
screen layouts at certain points. Its main 
problem is that it does not restore the 
screen colours on exit, leaving the 
desktop in a mess, 

The basic operation of Quick-List is 
that you put your disk in drive A:, select 
the READ option, and the disk is read 
with the files listed in the larger area of 
the screen. You are then asked if you 
want to add the disk to your data file. If 
you say yes, then a small keypad appears 
on the screen and you have to use the 
mouse to click on buttons to give the 
disk a number (which should then be 
written on the disk). Two problems 
with this bit: you cannot use the 
keyboard to type in the number and 
then hit Return (all programs should be 



fully usable from the keyboard - not just 
a problem with Quick- List, my pet hate 
is First Word Plus but that's beside the 
point). The main problem however is 
that you do not know what disks you 
have already entered, and it is quite 
possible to give a disk number twice, 
thus 'doubling up 1 the contents. 

Having entered the files (up to 1170) 
in this manner, you can then have the 
data sorted by disk number or by name, 
and then they can be viewed, Quick-List 
is not as powerful as Super-Directory in 
this respect, and I feci its largest 
drawback of all is that it does not 
include the path with the filenames in 
the printouts available. After a sort, the 
files become detached from their parent 
folders, and mis would make it a little 
more difficult when actually finding the 
file on the disk. You can also find files 
using a search option, which is quite 
flexible as it looks for your keyword 
anywhere in the filenames, so 'DEM 1 
would find both 'DEMOUAS' and 
'MODEM.DAT'. Additionally, it is 
possible to alter the name of a file stored 
in the list, as well as removing them. 

Another problem is that Quick-List 
looks for its data files on drive A: and 
not the current drive which makes it 
inconvenient for hard disk users, All 
directories are taken from drive A; too, 
which makes reading files on another 
type of disk (eg. my 5.25" drive) 
impossible, but this is probably not a 
great problem. 

Overall, I think that if you need a 
simple disk cataloguing program, then 
this is good value for money. With a 
little more work on tidying up, and a bit 
more functionality over sorting and the 
amount of information, it would be 
superb value. 

Several retailers will not stock Quick 
List because it is too cheap at £4.99 but 
it can be obtained by Mail Order from 
AK Software, 186 Holland Street, 
Crewe, Cheshire- Tel. (0270) 2126K 






]m * icHtTwr - :mx inim 



;Ui ■:■.■* ,11 ■!:«!■* ■<■*- 



tsici-Lisr ST 



jj m li 



!1 Cti: t: ':'■'"• > ■ 



"'IHutt^LisnT] 




M 



P*fic 6 - Issue ^2 



SLHACKSOFT 

A HAIL ORDER SERVICE 

I OR CUSTOMERS WHC 

KNOW WHAI IUry WANI 



/|\ ATARI ST 

ATARI 520 STM inc, mouse 1 99.00 

ATARI 520 STM, mouse, 0.5 meg drive 269.00 

ATARI 520 STM mouse, drive + monitor 369.00 

ATARI 520 STM mouse, 0,5 meg drive 

and Philips CM3833 colour monitor 525.00 
ATARI 520 STFM 269.00 

ATARI 520 STFM + mono monitor 369 00 

ATARI 520 STFM * Philips 8833 colour 525 00 

ATARI 1 040 Keyboard 399. 00 

ATARI 1040 + mono monitor 499.00 

ATARI 1040 + Philips 8833 colour monitor 658.00 

ATARI MEGA 2 799.00 

ATARI MEGA 2 + mono monitor 899.00 

ATARI MEGA 4 1099.00 

ATARI MEGA 4 + mono monitor 1 1 99.00 

ATARI SLM 804 LASER 1 099. 00 

ATARI SH205 HARD DISK 525.00 

PRINTERS 

ATARI SM804 1 49 Q0 

PANASONIC KXP I f>61 1 79,00 

MP 165 299 00 

NEC F6 24 PIN 499" 00 

CmZENI20D 159.00 

OTHERS AVAILABLE PLEASE PHONE 

15% OFF ALL SOFTWARE 



eft, 

STARGUDER 
FASTCOM 
FIRST WORLH 
SUPERBASE 
ACCOUNT ANTh 



RRP OUR PRICE 
24.95 21,70 

*49.% 43.43 

79.95 69.52 

99,95 86.91 

22885 199.00 



ACESSORIES 

MONITOR MASTER 
Monitor switcfi box. No more unplugging cables 
when changing from mono to colour monitor. 35.00 

COVERS 

For keyboards & monitors FERSPEX 7.95 

PVC 3 95 

UNISTAND printer stands 

Manufactured in perspex. With room for the paper 
underneath I j .95 



ALL PRICES INCLUDE VAT 
Futfage & p«dcing -hardware 5.00 

software and accessories 2.00 



ACCESS 



VISA 



SHACKSOFT 

UNIf 11/17. Wlllir HAySXCIJTH 
WFM wil TS IKAriNG ESTATE 

wrsiBiicy, wilts 

lei: 0373 &3&031 



^ ATARI 

am mnUuflpLUCL' us ••> 

MAILSHOT 

a revolutionary product 




£2495 



A powerful menj driven mailing list program which uses -a un*que 
syslenn lor on-screen scnolfing of label; This WYSIWYG (What You 
See Is Whsl You Gslj iyst«n means ihal any label Format you Mm 
on |he screen wiJI be identical *he« printed. 
As wall as. powerful sorting and searching (search lor anything, 
anywhere). Special Rouimwi inc ude deiection of duplicate labets. 
surname sorlmg and many, many rwne 

FLEXIBILITY - you may also use MAILSHOT lor many olfier routine 
day to day labelling and dalabase applications. 



MAILSHOT PLUS 



£49.95 



This advanced version of Maiishot is simply the MOST po#erlul and 
flexible mailing program available. As* for our brochure for full 
rlfl-ai 5. 




SPECTRUM ANALYSERV r £99 i95 

HI-FI OWNERS and musicians use Spectrum Analyse* lo create *n 
encilmg v3ua! image c-1 youfmusic. 

Watch you r music displayed m bar chart formal Each bar 
corresponds to a particular range of frequencies . . SEE how (one 
controls, niters, etc. affeci your muse outpui 

IDEAL for enthusiasts as a vis.ua! aid lo tcNm ihe perlact bass, 
tnsb*?. balance, etc. Us* as an imaginative and exciling addition to 
your existing music system 




Pii R F&-Is*uc 12 J7 



PC Ditto turns your Atari ST into an 
IBM PC Clone. It works on the 520 or 
1040 with cither Colour or Mono screen 
and 3.5" and 5.25" diskettes as well as 
hard disks. 

The documentation provided with it 
(on disk) lists over 300 pieces of PC 
software which have been certified as 
running under PC Ditto. I tested a few 
myself on my 520ST with a colour 
monitor and both Atari and Triangle 
drives and found nothing that would not 
work. Very impressive. 

But ... everything I tried ran at 
around quarter the speed of a PC, The 
distributors, Robtek, claim that it runs 
at around 80% of a PC I tried Lotus 
1-2-5 (Version 2.01 - 3.5" version), 
IBM DisplayWYite Assistant (Version 
1 .5 - 3.5" version) and a few games - 
Dragonworld, Mean 18, Calbcto Island, 



PC DITTO 



basis you may be more interested in the 
fact that it works than how fast it is. 

Apart from the performance there are 
a few other limitations. First, it won't 
run IBM BASIC(A). This is a common 
limitation with PC Clones, caused by 
the fact that a large part of the BASIC is 
in microcode in the ROM on the PC 
System Board and is copyrighted by 
IBM. I seem to remember hearing that 
there were versions of BASIC around 
thai could bypass that problem - if it is 
important to you then contact your local 
IBM Dealer. Secondly, PC Ditto will 
only run software configured for an 
IBM PC rather than a Clone. This of 
course raises the basic question of what 
exactly is compatibility! 

No machine is 100% compatible. 
Amstrad, for instance, do not even claim 
compatibility - they say they can "two. 



Can your ST really behave like a PC? 
Patrick Owen tests out Robtek's new 
IBM emulator which at £89.95 is a lot 
cheaper than buying a second computer! 



Rogue and The Leather Goddesses of 
Phobos under both PC DOS 3.2 and PC 
DOS 2.1. The text in Calixto Island and 
Dragon world scrolled up quite quickly 
(half speed?), but whenever it had to 
display graphics it slowed down 
significantly, and the music on 
Dragon world came out at less than a 
third of the normal speed - a very 
strange effect. All of my other tests (e.g. 
loading 200 records into 1-2-3 and 
sorting them, paging up and down in 
the word processor, and issuing multiple 
commands in LGoP) ran around 3 to 7 
times slower under PC Ditto. 

In case I had either faulty software or 
problems with my hardware I tried a 
friend's 1040 ST with the same results 
and also got a new copy of PC Ditto 
from Robtek. The new copy did have 
about half a dozen bytes different in one 
program file, but had no effect at all on 
the response times. Robtek say they 
have 5,000 happy users - either I am 
doing something wrong, or those users 
don't realise how fast a PC should go - I 
do because I have an IBM PC sitting 
beside my ST! 

Of course speed is not necessarily 
critical- If you are running a program 
which gives sub-second responses then 
under PC Ditto it may well still be fast 
enough to use. If you want compatibility 
with your office machine on a casual 



all the famous IBM software'*. IBM has 
a wide range of machines which are not 
fully compatible, e.g. a 3270-PC screen 
has no intensity attribute bit so you only 
get 3 colours in text mode instead of 16, 

IBM published a set of extremely 
extensive Technical Reference Manuals 
for the PC and PC DOS, These more 
than anything accounted for the success 
of the PC. They allowed more people 
than ever before to produce compatible 
hardware and software. So what is 
meant by compatibility 1 is not that the 
machine should be 100% identical, but 
that it should conform to the interfaces 
described in the manuals. 

Unfortunately technology moves on 
and some of the standards are now 
either inadequate or obsolete. IBM itself 
no longer sells 'PCs' - the new range is 
called the Personal System 2, though it 
is of course 'PC Compatible' The main 
problem areas are threefold: the 
keyboard, the screen, and the disk 
drives. 

On the keyboard side PC Ditto does 
very well - the Atari ST has lots of keys 
and only a few mappings are required, 
these are documented on a template. 
Two minor problems: the backslash, 
hash, tilde and broken vertical bar keys 
are all mixed up and there is no audio 
feedback, Le, no click of any kind when 
you successfully depress a key. 



The screen is pretty good, but here is 
where we find a number of 
undocumented limitations. Blinking, 
underlining and highlighting are not 
fully supported. In Medium Res Colour 
PC Ditto only supports 4 colours in text 
mode and in Mono High Res only 2. A 
PC Colour Screen has 8 plus intensity 
making 16. In order to see what I was 
outlining for Block Commands in 
DisplayWrite Assistant I had to get it to 
emulate a PC Mono Screen on my ST 
Colour Screen - at least it did work 
then! 

What about disk drives? Virtually all 
PC software these days is provided on 
double-sided diskettes (both 5.25" and 
3,5"). PC Ditto recommends "If you are 
not technically experienced and can not 
obtain technical assistances we 
recommend that you purchase a 
double-sided drive. The cost of the 
drive will most likely be worth avoiding 
the technical frustration you will 
encounter." I wholeheartedly endorse 
this. Whether you choose 5,25" or 3.5' 1 
is up to you. But without a double -sided 
drive no amount of technical experience 
will enable you to load a protected 
program such as Lotus 1-2-3 which only 
comes on double-sided diskettes! 

One other area which can affect your 
ability to run a program under PC Ditto 
is the memory My 520ST has 364K left 
*for PC use. The documentation says a 
1040 will have 703K (but PC DOS will 
probably limit you to 640K anyway!). 
In conclusion, I would recommend 
that if there is some particular PC 
software which you want to run on your 
ST, you should check before buying PC 
Ditto that what you want will a) load on 
your hardware, b) not use colours or 
highlighting which make it unusable 
and c) run fast enough for your needs. 
For those interested in other ways of 
achieving IBM PC compatibility the 
following may be of interest. If your PC 
has a 3.5" drive then, as long as you 
format your diskettes on the PC, you 
can transfer flat ASCI I files between the 
machines with no problems (at least I 
have had none so far!). You will need 
DOS 3,2 to format the 3,5" diskettes 
and if your Atari ST has only a 
single -sided drive you will need to use a 
command such as DEVICE = 
DRIVERSYS ,D:2 ,H:1 in your 
CONFIG.SYS to configure a 
single-sided drive on your PC 3.5" 
drive. If you want even more power and 
PC ability you may wish to investigate 
Alfa Electronics Ltd (01 -300-2568) -for 
£239 they will provide you with their 
Supercharger (8086 processor, 1MB 
RAM, etc) to plug into the back of your 
ST! • 



3S 



Page ft - ]s*u« 31 






MAILSHOT 

Digita International 

£24.95 

Reviewed by 
Les Effingham 

There have been, surprisingly few 
programs for the ST to produce labels 
or mailing shots, in fact I can think of 
only one, Label Maker [reviewed last 
issue) and that was written because 
there were no other programs available - 
Digita International have now, however, 
converted a popular Amstrad program 
over to the ST and Mailshot should be 
able to handle almost all your mailing 
requirements. It is also quite suitable as 
a mini database. 

Mailshot does not use GEM but it 
does use the mouse and gives you full 
WYSIWYG with a unique system of 
scrolling labels up and down the screen. 
Each label is entered exactly as it would 
be if you were typing directly onto 
paper but of course with the added 
facilities of a computer database that 
allows sorting or searching of records 
and manipulating of labels, The 
program comes with a manual .'tutorial 
but the tutorial could have been a lot 
better. The program is, however, quite 
easy to use after having glanced through 
the manual once or twice. 

Let's assume that you have a list of 
names and addresses that you want to 
store for mailing. Just click on ADD (or 
use the keyboard) and type in the first 
label, Arrow keys can be used to move 
about anywhere within the label and the 
label is terminated by hitting RETURN 
on the last line. Hitting RETURN again 
will take you on to the next label and so 
you keep adding as many labels as you 
wish. Simple The completed set of 
records can now be saved, sorted or 



printed. Saving the labels is 
straightforward and several sets of the 
same labels, sorted in different ways, 
can easily be saved. 

One of the major problems with many 
databases is the inflexibility of sorting 
and you often have to plan quite 
carefully when setting up database fields 
to ensure that you c:an sort as required . 
Mailshot has a unique system of 
markers which make sorts infinitely 
flexible. If, for example, you wish to sort 
on a surname, many databases force you 



1 

1 

mm 


JM ■■» » «"- '■■-. I* S | 


1MB IV III l« - 


1. HI ' I 

E 

V" 

■■ 

.:■:.■ 

:■ 


•■■■■• i 
. ■ ■ ■ 

it::* ■ 

■ 

__ 


SflflHl 


..:■ ■ 
i 






■ i 'i ■■ 7.1-Hitr 




. 






I 


'«" 


A* 



to have a separate field for the surname 
or to type surname first followed by 
initials. With Mailshot you simply press 
a function key to place a marker before 
you type the surname and then perform 
a sort on this marker. Up to four 
markers can be used in any label so that 
several different sorts or levels of sort 
can be made. The markers can also be 
inserted on labels already entered so 
there is no problem if they are missed 
out as you type and, of course, you can 
go through a list and put the markers in 
another place thus allowing different 
types of sort. With this system it is quite 
possible to sort in almost any fashion 
you wish, a very powerful feature. 
Sorting is done in memory and is 
extremely fast. 

Printing is also straightforward and 



flexible and you can set up labels in a 
number of ways. Margins tan be altered 
and the user can choose the number of 
labels across as well how many of each 
label to prim. A message can also be 
added to the label before it is printed. 
Normally the whole file is printed at one 
go and this is where one of the problems 
with the program arose. If your printer 
goes wrong or jams part way through a 
printout there does not seem to be an 
easy way to start printing again at a 
particular label. It is possible to get 
around this but it is not as simple as it 
should be* 

There are several other features such 
as being able to add 'memo 1 lines to a 
label (which are not printed), there is 
automatic detection of duplicate labels 
and conventional searching on any line. 
The program caters for up to 1,000 
labels per database and these can easily 
be broken down into 'subsets' so that 
different types of mailing can be 
performed from one set of records. This 
makes it possible to perform a mailing in 
an almost totally arbitrary fashion, 
which is seldom possible on 
conventional databases. 

Mailshot is excellent value at £24.95 
and will probably satisfy the labelling 
needs of almost every home user. An 
enhanced version of the program called 
Mailshot Plus is also available at £49.95 
but the few extra features will probably 
not be needed by most home users, If 
you have a printer you almost need 
Mailshot and you will probably find 
untold uses for it. Because the program 
is called Mailshot you might think that 
it can only be used for long mailing lists 
but it can just as easily be used for 
labelling disks, schoolbooks, 
membership cards, photographs, bottles 
of wine, video tapes and much more. It 
could end up as one of the most used 
programs you buy! « 




COMPUTER 

Factory 

• Unit 4 Stan nets ■ 
Laindon North Trade Centre • 

* Basildon • Esssx ■ 
' SS15 6DJ ■ 

-oaee 541212' 



»nyiii 



Grouu 



The 

COMPUTER 

Factory 

The one-stop mail order shop 
for ALL your computing needs! 

WAREHOUSE-DIRECT 
TO YOUR FRONT DOOR! 



Send now for our 
Mail Order cat a log je 

1 000's Of GREAT VALUE 
products to choose from 

for your ATARI ST, 

COMMODORE AMIGA, 

IBM PC/AT/PS-2 

and APPLE MACINTOSH! 

CALLERS WELCOME 

Mon-Sat 10am-6pm 



Page b- Issue n 39 



TURBO DIZER 



A-Magic/ Software Express 
£129.95 



Yes, it really is called the Turbo Dizer - the name doesn't 
give much away does it? Turbo Dizer (TD from hereon) is a 
high speed video digitizer for the ST, designed to capture video 
frames in monochrome from any standard video source (video 
camera, video recorder or even a television having a video 
output}. Here, monochrome means it uses different shades of 
one colour, not that the image is in ST high resolution mode. In 
fact, it works only in low-res mode. 

TD is supplied in a simple, foam padded cardboard box and 
it's obvious that money hasn't been wasted on frivolous 
packaging. Inside you find a rather large ST cartridge 
containing the frame-grabbing circuitry, a disk containing the 
software, and a miserable little instruction booklet consisting of 
just twelve pages of which only five are in English (the rest are 

Ln German). 

The-cartridge sits completely outside the ST's cartridge slot 
on four little rubber feet, the circuit board carrying the edge 
connector being extended about 1.5 baches clear of the cartridge 
ease to facilitate this. The opposite end of the case carries a 
standard BNC bayonet connector for the video signal input. 

There are no cables supplied with this unit, but suitable ones 
are easily obtainable from stores selling video equipment. In 
fact, I found I already had cables with appropriate connectors 
amongst the bits and bobs I've accumulated for use with my 
video recorder. 

MONITOR MYSTERY 

The ultra-skimpy manual proved to be virtually useless. It 
doesn't really tell you how to connect up the system, nor does it 
mention that the ST's monitor doesn't actually display the 
image you want to digitize prior to its capture! 1 naively 
assumed that the cartridge would pass the video signal straight 
through to the monitor screen so you could see what you were 
trying to capture. Not so! You need a separate means of 




If you are looking for a way to 
get digitised images on your 

ST at a reasonable price check 
out the Turbo Dizer. John S 
Davison did and got some 
excellent results 



monitoring the incoming signal. The computer monitor only 
shows the last frame captured, and if you haven't yet captured 
anything then you don't see anything Logical, I suppose, in a 
perverse sort of way. 

Fortunately, the Sony KV1440 combined TV monitor I use 
with the ST can simultaneously take both the RGB signals from 
the computer (showing the captured image) and RF signals 
from a video recorder (showing images to be captured), with the 
ability to switch between them at the press of a button. If your 
equipment can't handle two sets of inputs then you may have to 
improvise some form of external switching arrangement or use a 
separate TV or monitor to view the incoming signal. 

The disk contains English and German language versions of 
the program, but has no sample digitized images or utility 
programs often supplied with packages of this type and the 
program itself is rather basic - there are no facilities for 
manipulating captured images before saving, for loading and 
viewing previously captured images, or for such niceties as 
looking at disk directories or formatting disks. Nor is there any 
way of using desk accessories for these functions from within 
the program. 

SIMPLE CONTROLS 

After loading, the program takes you straight to a simple 
control screen. This allows you to choose the colour for your 
captured frame (grey, red, green or blue); to set number of 
shades/levels for that colour (2, 4, 8, or 16); to request use of 
'stippled' patterns as well as 'solid 1 shades (which doubles the 
number of available shades); to set the format for saved files 
(DEGAS, Neochrome, Art Director or Bit Map) and to select 
Start, Help, Info, Save, or Quit. All of these are activated via 
mouse selected buttons, as the program doesn't use drop down 

menu 3- 

By using different numbers of shades you can obtain different 
effects in your captured frame. This can range from the soot 
and whitewash' look produced from the two level selection right 
up to a reasonable 'photographic' quality from the 16 shades 
plus stippling setting. 

Unlike the other colours, when using the grey option you re 
limited to a maximum of eight solid shades, as this is all the ST 
can handle at present. If you select sixteen grey shades the 
program uses only eight, but substitutes eight alternate 
COLOURS for the missing greys. As these are purely 
Eirbitrarv, the effect produced is rather bizarre to say the least! 



*o 



Fa*r ft - Iwik 32 







The program has no apparent method of changing these 
colours, so you're stuck with them unless you change them later 
using a separate art program, 

The sensible selection of saved file formats means you can 
transfer captured images into most art programs to alter 
colours, clean up the image, add embellishments etc. as you 
wish. Also, you can use the images with just about any 
slideshow, desktop publishing, or other graphics utility, or even 
use them in your own programs. 

HIGH SPEED 

Willi everything connected up, options, chosen, and the video 
source running, capturing an image is simplicity itself. A press 
of the space bar results in the video image frame currently being 
presented to the cartridge being grabbed, digitized, read into 
the ST's memory, processed for chosen colour and shades, and 
displayed on the ST's monitor screen. This happens quite 
rapidly, actual speed depending on the number or" shades, 
varying from about an eighth of a second for two levels to about 
one second for 1 ft levels. 

TD doesn't capture a complete video frame, but slices about 
1.5 inches off the top, bottom, and each side of the frame (on a 
14 inch monitor). This means that frames originally composed 
for full screen viewing are cropped, sometimes annoyingly so. If 
you're digitizing an image directly from a video camera you can 
allow for this, though. The image also suffers minor Llistortion 
as circles appear slightly oval, but this isn't a serious problem. 

As well as controlling overall image appearance via number of 
shades, the program also allows you to alter its contrast range- 
Unfortunately you can't apply this to an image already 
captured, and have to recapture it for the adjustment to take 
effect, There's no indication of where the range is set at any 
given time, so once you move it from the default position it's 
difficult to reset it to neutral again. 

1 found capturing frames 'on the fly' from a video tape 
running at normal speed to be a rather hit and miss affair, with 
captured images often blurred beyond recognition, I found the 
best results were obtained using the video recorder's still-frame 
facility My faithful old Toshiba Beta machine has four video 
heads, designed to produce still-frames without those unsightly 





su 


N 


ARO V 


RECREATIONAL 






SrlALlLiTIGN $thjlt£0v 


mmm 




1IJH 


JWT1HEL III! 


IUIU1H 




mi 


HM **i nil 


uifiiia 




1UI 


tUtUIUlE It! 


M1MUW ILTIIMTE 




111! 


FUU1 tlMLllH ii ,i >, 


MFEIDED DF Tnl CUM! 




3X1 


EOTMIUFMIMII ll.H 


tec 




ll.lt 


LUMinua his 


EIHFW UtEt 




11.11 


niniiEit mi 


UUITLEI 




■••• 


KJD Wll I.IWI hh 


uaiinu 




lilt 


■HI WW EM It.H 


■Qll MMIFI 




■M 


1ILEIT IH1III III 


fllPUM 




IS. IS 


111! UTTLE IHHL1IDI 111 


F*FI IHI 




11.11 


ItllH run 1,1 


ITtHLIHI 




!■>! 


*mtn hum im 


lUFtMMlll 




ii. n 




'"■" iuiieii 




11. IS 


BUSlHESSfllTILITVrfL.ANGLlAGES. 


MM MM 




AM 




itmimt 




15.15 


AlflKEl *IT ITIIIO ll.ll 


'! FinLHmns 




HI! 


nimirni am 


ihmm 




H.tFJ 


HIT BltELT** H.H 


■EITIIH UHEI 




WM 


UtE tif MMh w.n 


HU 




ll.M 


Cllll j'l.J! 

run hue nun uh 


ADVENTURE 






Fin line mim h.k 
Fin Hiueroi a.m 


HILtWIHIEm 




MM 


t in *tM'l*1 n.n 


KIIIHTMC 




It It 


IU1H 11. K 


LIJ.THIB HDDIHII 




1111 


IHTI :m 


leiivre e*i> uum 




1111 


ilHLUll nil 


HUB 1 HUT 




It 11 


•uaruii rmiw mi 


Hn him not! 




lilt 


El ■Kin IS.K 


IMtlttltTu 




11.11 


IIHFIHIE PtlrtWHE 14.ll 


THE «*» 




Ifcll 


vir rmtf Etiuui 13 ii 


■^B 


Cheques. PCJ's Ace*S8 number to;- ■wwtBBl 


E3 


SUNARO SOFTWARES) ^ v ^ 


P.O. HOX 


7S, MACCLESFIELD, CHESHIRE, SKlO 3PF 


TELEPHONE (0625) 


25228 M1CROLINK MAG9*023 



noise bars across the picture area. It also has a variable speed 
frame advance facility, 'and I found both these features 
invaluable in finding good frames to digitize. 

EXCELLENT RESULTS 

In summary, TD works very well once you know what you're 
doing. I tried capturing images from several different video 
recordings, and produced some excellent results after a period 
of experimentation, I also transferred saved images to Art 
Director without problem. I didn't get chance to try it with a 
video camera) or to test compatibility with other software 
packages, but there's no reason to believe the results would be 
any different. 

The package is let down by its primitive software, which 
provides only the most basic of functions and A-Magic should 
throw that awful instruction booklet in the dustbin and start 
again. Having said that, Turbo Dizer does bring video 
digitizing down to an affordable price so if you need a low cost 
digitizer Turbo Dizer is definitely worth looking at. • 



Since the above review was written we understand from Mike 
Jone of Software Express that mail of the criticisms of the software 
and manual have been attended to. Version 2 of (he Turbo Dizer 

contains improved software that allows easier adjusting of the tones 
of a picture> loads pictures m any formal, include): an editor for 
colours etc. and allows animation similar to the more expensive 
S.A.M. In addition j the manual h to be completely rewritten by 
Software Express themselves. The new version of Turbo Dizer will 
retail at £149.95 but existing owners can upgrade to the new 
software for just £5. Software Express may stiil have some stock at 
£129.95 so if you get in quick and then pay just £5 for the software 
upgrade you can save a few pounds! 



Pbuc 6 - Issu# J2 



41 




SECRETS 



Find out how to control the 
graphics on your ST. Colm 
Cox brings you some of the 
secrets of programming the 
ST with examples in ST 
BASIC, C and Assembler 






This issue we will take a first look at 
graphic* on the ST. This machine is a 
complex beast in the field of graphics, 
just look at the specification - 640 x 400 
in mono (2 colours^ 640 x 200 with 4 
colours and 320 x 200 with 16 colours. 
There is also an enormous palette of 5 12 
colours to choose from and 32 K of video 
ram! 1 will split my description of 
graphics on the ST into two parts thus, 
hopefully s giving the features the ST 
boasts a good airing. 

THE CUSTOM GRAPHICS 
CHIP 

To Start we need to lake a. look at the 
hardware registers of the custom 
graphic chip - The Shifter' - used by 
the ST but first we must discuss the 
concept of logical and physical screen 
bases. 

The ST takes an area of 12 K of ram 
and then converts it into a form suitable 
for display. The area of ram being 



displayed is called the 'Physical screen 
base 1 " however when we give a 
command, for instance, to draw a line 
between co-ordinates lOJOto 100,50 
the ST must change screen memory for 
us to see the line. The area of memory 
that the ST alters is called the 'Logical 
screen base*, This can be the same as the 
Physical screen base but the Logical and 
Physical screen bases can be different, 
allowing us to have a picture displayed 
on the screen while another is drawn. 
When the second picture is drawn, it 
can be displayed instantly which opens, 
the door to an animation technique 
called 'Page flipping' where a series of 
slightly differing pictures are drawn, 
held in memory and then rapidly shown 
one after the other giving the illusion of 
movement. 

THE REGISTERS 

The video chip's hardware registers 
start at address $FF82Q0 and continue 



M> TftwiffrHi m i if iiiTiHwiii ii i i nn-i-m-fr-Hfcu-ufci-i-i-tfci ■ u n i m i 



■ r.cut nw - LmM mm 



PBjin Jwmi'HUii'H^Ji iinnn i nuiniiinn iit mtHini u a n ■ lAi-H-i** 

PEF1 Qmmu iri o*qi Hapf-Lnq 'cuis-v. Tut- r ■]■■ trm iwd, addr ■ ■■■■! 

KM 496C4Q *ra *7*Mti. Ihi h #-itiw, in Hth md Enwi tM- i-*c. icHni 

KH L Ml b* i L I PIMM aiiunl al 1li* |ira>.» iri ■ h>f. 



I.W 
LIP 
L3* 

iZii 
|.*o 
LH 
iMi 

LtU 

LK> 
l«4 

am 
-■in 

ISO 

mi 

7*0 



JJfr >*iM C*"1fc,..t.vc.,-^:, , 



luti 



4» 

■ «■■' 
4Sii 
■W 
47 D 

■ mi 

SOil 
->^l II 

!KW 
13ii 
*** I 

99a i 

gjjj | 
Wl i 
JOTF+ I 



RCDCL u 1 1 Or*-a r. i k#U « J 

lh wniunin^Hiny nwn GP-IWiCT- IWi iw» w 
IT MBO.LT I D>^tHJ-C-J Tk«M CK-33DIO-J-D*! WMd 
ih »wi riiw-i.hj:r. i*n i -i-^ii- :--j:«...iw- .... 
Wa*ML^TCKiUHM4C>-199U^FCK)t>:b44ailJkPKM «■«- 

KM ■ r 

TCP1 : DLEMI H«h KJKEM I 

PCH ■ • • I 

ilhiMn *■* PtfYAICAi. *CK*n - 1 *** 
• LDilGWL KHWH - z •*** 

1 **- ntniuL WJMMM ■ z *** 

POKE CHHTH. B 3i't»[IV14LiiHH r**mw LDfllUkL ICMEm - i **»* 

H« : IMIT.HkLIK M™ BO«ifV I 

«H . , 

■CJKEM- I iUW IMHKKEkli FlLLki ~i i~l riWHi a^AOTDi- a ,<5 

PflJtil ~TBLB kl ill! hH EFar Ihi mi - ■_■■■' 
KHIH- "!■ MftfcjAfM h.-Hli l..t u .ri fi-Wili:*- 

khiaj- -tk-^i ,* diirlivKl In k Invtwil.. 1 

PRIM* <n- M ■■■ La wKit'iWmiHffr-;-thirvi ii* ULpi i I 

COj£P- I . j_1 , A.IirCJKLl Ci.L-i.r* 

"*. n 

1CK.i->:,UCU feArtCMCNiFu.Li» ' i'i ITiihM u.ttAfuiP u,-a 

MImI> "IF,!, up +h, nil.-- - H. ■|| l ., ««J- 

rniH* ■*•« qriptiicii. "i itaa^ 

PfllhiT 'fthi A ea «.hfc'iPA3pjT-pW F -F.h«^ n.-u- dUpa urtM 

FOA AHA 14 « il-|f -WB/tW 

CDUW I ,l_l ,3l»f JC,2iPC3Pn_I Cl r CV,Pti1«*a-]HK!L-!.i«.r n 



■V WH *r* BUWPW PC WTMBI TW DmBR 



BCKEit-i ■ lUCl* MMCK.N, I -d-*- I Ji- , |h p-M C* 1~+» 14P HIE) Ma- 
ws* n*-y. ipj»up mnnmi >aivrzhi cr i-*a a* i^r? tpmh «r*r> ■ss* 

IKllO 30O 

HCH + ■- 

KF1 : ■(»■ ■ MLPH.D - PCITOn 4VEHYTHEHB Tt> pDHM. I 



JOi-Oo 

whs 
10-1 » 

MIK 



i - thu- najTric» FUCTim ib *a fl:p BrikCEpi rw ru aaaam. tw - 

PKN m ilMlEJm. KMCh hw r, h» ■ in ih- hk»*n, hhli k ~h» >wyi:w + 

MM ■ «»■:»<■ .p-K I* BCi rn pqihi rn IH DTpn PCKIM. IH i^ll ¥PV If - 

IKPI * 1* POVIIMjC "C MM Ot OK BUCDi, AIilI DIVLAVIUI- T-* dt-eji - 

BOI ■ IW THDi KWW tVC blTuAIEOfl, i-IWaviH iw QTh*ft ADMEJi. v 

PMH HKMfrKH>lhHtmilHtllltl«»HMKHI.H«.H'»m»»H1lMH» 

!■■ • ■■■ 3* »-f.. if wstiktai i-hCM r-nwi.fL-vis:*» elde r-vncooo-L inpitH. 

P*to|P-T ii-'WH H-l i LhKtHT IL/19334 i iF-C^- *S9L*-#tf.t I--L-kS3JA*1.hi 
nF-IHTT IF3 ■■TSiM DQT fiCB-JiHm* bH+4C , i h. mu, uud.i i 
HF Ifl-llfnifrirnifTrr i.pHi.p^Et l.mipjp hihimnm 



on to SFF8260 

SFFS201 - (8 bit R/W) High byte of 
physical screen base address. 
SFFS203 - (K bit R/WJ Mid byte of 
physical screen base address. 
The low byte of the physical screen base 
address cannot be changed, it always is 
zero 3 which means that the ST can only 
display areas of ram with starting 
addresses which are multiples of 256. 

The next three registers are quite 

interesting - they provide the address of 
the word presently being displayed. 
They are read only and, as they 
increment at such a fast rate, are 

excellent random number generators. 

SFFS205 - (8 bit R only) High byte of 
address of word currently being 
displayed. 

SFF8207 - (8 bit R only) Mid byte of 
address of word currently being 
displayed. 

SFFS209 - (8 bit R only) Low byte of 
address of word currently being 
displayed. 

SFF820A - (8 bit R.'W) This byte 
controls the synchronisation of the 
monitor and display chip. 
Bit 1 controls the screen frequency - 
= 60hz, 1 = 50hz (Sec Dave Keel's 
article in Page 6, Issue 23, entitled 'A 
Bigger Screen'}. The effect of bit 1 is to 
enlarge the screen area on mid/ low res 
monitors. This bit has no use with mono 
monitors. Bit allows the 
syncronisation of the monitor to be 
either internal or external. Internal = 
(normal setting) means that the video 
chip takes care of picture sync External 
= 1 means that the sync pulses come 
from an outside source, e.g, a video 
camera etc. The practical effect of 
selecting external sync is that you get no 
picture! Try (from STBasie): DEF 
SEG = &HFF8200:POKE 
&HA,&HFD. To get your picture back 
(you'll have to type 'blind') type POKE 
&HA S &H¥C. 



42 



1'agc € — Issue 32 



SFF8240 - (16 bit R/W) Colour palette 

register 

IFF8242 -(16 bit R/W) Colour palette 

register 1 

&FFS244 - (16 bit R/W) Colour palette 

register 2 



SFF825A - (16 bit R/W) Colour palette 

register 13 

JFF&25C - (16 bit R/W) Colour palette 

register 14 

SFF825E - (16 bit R/W) Colour palette 

register 1 5 

Each of the colour registers take a 16 
bit value which specifies the intensity of 
the red, green and blue parts for that 
colour. The form of the 1 G bit word is 

SXRGB 
where the Hex digit X has no function 
and the digits R,G and B detail the 
intensity (0 to 7) of that particular 
colour. This is where we get the 
specification 5 1 2 colour? (8 x 8 x 8), 

The user with a mono monitor can 
try: DEF SEG=0:POKE &HFF8240,] 

For users with colour monitors, a very 
powerful technique called colour 
rotation i$ available - see Steve Pedler's 
article in issue 28 for an explanation. 

Certain values relating to the screen 
arc stored in low memory by the 
operating system. This is similar to the 
idea of shadow registers on the 8 bit 
Atari machines where values are stored 
in low memory and then transferred to , 
the hardware registers every 60th of a 
second. A similar situation is the case on 
the ST. 

S44C - (16 bit R/W] Graphic resolution 

This register allows the user to switch 
between resolutions. It works only when 
switching between low and medium 
resolution, as switching from high to 
low or low to high is impossible because 
different monitors are required. This 
register also allows the programmer to 
determine what the current screen 
resolution is, The values stored in this 
'register' are: JO = Low reSj SI 00 = 
Med res, $200 = High res. 

S44E - (32 bit R only) Logical Screen 
Base address. 

This 4 bit register contains the logical 
screen base address. I have used this in 
Listing 1 (ST Basic), The program 
demonstrates the technique of page 
flipping, I have used only two screens 
but you can use as many as you wish, 
providing you can find sufficient 
memory] 



10 
20 
30 
44 
50 
AD 
70 
SO 

tc 

10O 

110 

120 

130 

140 

ISO 

140 

170 

ISO 

190 

ZOO 

310 

220 

230 

244 

250 

260 

270 

ZBO 

290 

3O0 

310 

320 

330 

340 

350 

340 

370 

3BO 

390 

4C0 

410 

420 

430 

440 

430 

440 
*70 
4 BO 
490 
300 
510 
320 
530 
540 
330 
340 
570 
5B0 
390 
400 
AlO 
420 
430 
440 
430 
4*0 
470 
480 
490 
7O0 
710 
720 
730 
740 
750 
30990 
30991 
30992 
30993 
30994 
30995 
30994 
30Q97 
3099B 
30999 
31000 
JlOOl 
MOO? 
3IOQ3 
31004 
31005 
31006 
31O07 
31008 
31009 
31010 
3101 1 
31012 
31013 
31014 
31015 
31014 
31017 



ST Sacrata urln 

by 

COLM COX 



GRAPHICS part ona 



ARTICLE TW 

ST Sine 
PASE 4 HABAZINE - .ENGLAND 



LISTING TWO 



REM ....*•**<• 

REN • 
REN • 
REH • 

REN • 

REM * 

REM # 

REM # 

REM #•#•#+»#••■ 

REM 

REM ThlB prograa uaaa tha fact that niimliiri a tor ad in an inttgtr array 
REM *r* itgrid aaquan 1 1 a 1 1 y . Th« intaflar array* in uiid to mtarm tha 
PEN Sprlta Definition Block and uaad a* tha buffar -for tha background. 
REN Tha addraaa o# tha array* arm than pamavd to thai Lina A eed*. you 
REH Bv*n kima thl* -fact to atora n/c programs, in an array' 
REN 

REN + ____*. 

REN t INI TALI BE EVERYTHING I 

REH + — ■ ■ - * 

NAX-2lDIN SPRITES (371 , BACKGROUNDS C266*MAX > ,I(HAII .VlNfln ,X1(HAXJ,YI (MAXJ 
K I a3j V I -3 1 TOP-0 1 BCTT DM- 3B3 1 LEFT-O I R 1 BHT-&231 It "O i Y-O 
L ! NEfl - I.H7FBM : 1 FJ ] T-0 i DRAW- 1 1 REMOVE -2 

REM «■-■ j- 

REM J REftO IN SPRITE fiEFINITIQN J 

REH + + 

RESTORE felOrFQR A-0 TO 36i READ A*. SPRITES i A) -VAL ( -*H"*A*> ■ NEXT A 
FOR A-0 TD rtAX-}i*<ftt-INTlf?NDtl>«RIGHT> iY!A) -JuT ifiNDd ) «BOTTDM} 
XI<4>=INi (RND(l]>14}-7|YMA)-lNT(RNDf 1)*14)-7iNEXT A 
BOBUB 3lOOOiCALL LINEAR IN] Ti , GO SUB 690 

REN *■ h 

REH I MAIN LOOP I 

REM + * 

LJOSUB DRAW. SPRITES I REM DRAM C— ♦ 

GOSUB HOVE. SPRITES i REM MOVE I 

goeub erase. Sprites i goto 330»rfh erase * 

REM * >. 

REH ! DRAM SPRITES IN ORDER] LOW TO HIGH I 

REM *■ „ + 

D« AH. SPRITES (FOR A-0 TO HAJC-1 

SPADDR-YARPTR <SPR1 TES lOlli BKADDR-vARPTR (BACKGROUNDS (QJ 1 

CALL L]NEA<DRAW,X(A) ,YtA) ,5PADDR,BKAI>Dn+A*Zfi4> 

NEXT A [RETURN 

REM +— + 

REH I ERASE SPRITES IN DRDERi HIGH TO LOW I 

REM + __ _ + 

ERASE. SPRITES I FOR A-nAX-1 TO O HTEP -1 

SPADDR-VARFTRIEPR1TEH0} ) i BKADDR-VARPTR (BACKGROUNDS CO> > 
CALL L I NEA( REMOVE, BKADDR+A*244> 
NEXT AiRETURN 

REN ! MOVE EACH SPRITE ACCORDING TO ITS XI AND ¥1 INCREMENTS 

REM + , , 

HOVE. SPRITES I FOR fl-O TO HAH-1 ■ X-H (A) I Y-V CA) I X I-XI {AH VI-VI ( A) 
X-X+«IilF KLEFT OR X>RIBHT THEN X I — X I ■ X-X+XI+Jtl 

y~v+yiiiF v-ctop or v>bottdii rhCN yi— viiY-v+n+¥i 

X(A)-X|Y(A)-VlXl(HlaiXIlVl (A) -YI I NEXT A 
RETURN 

REM •■ 1 

REM 1 SPRITE DEFINITION BLOCK I 

REM + + 

DATA 0,0,0,0,1 

DATA FFFF,FFFF,FFFF,aOOl ,C003, BOOl , COOS, BOO 1 
DATA C0O3,aO0J,D0O3,BO01 , COOS , BOOl , C0C3 , BOO 1 
DATA C003, BOO 1, C003 ! BOO 1, COOS .BOOl, C0O3, BOOl 
DATA CO03, BOO 1 , C0O3 , SOO 1 , FFFF , BOOl, FFFF,FFFF 

REN * , h 

REN I TRASH DN THE SCREEN FOR THE SPRITES TD HOVE OVER I 

FULLH 2) CLEAR* 2 1 BOTOX Y 0,0 

?"A» ydti can ini, tha fpritam aovi In a" 

7"non daatructlva- iinnH-, Thalr >p<*d i»" 

7" »l oh #or tha alapla n«on that Stiic' 

?"ia *]«'" 

FDR X»D TO 300 STEP SiLINEF X ,100, ISO, LBOiNEXT X 

RETURN * 

REM 



I 



REH 
REH 

REH 
REH 
REH 
REH 
REM 
REM 
REM 



INSTALL CODE FOR LINE A SPRITES. CALLED BY, CALL (ARBS . .J 
ARE*] - FUNCTION TO CARRY QUTi O-lNItALISE LINE A FOR USE. 
1-DRAU BPRTTE -> ARB*2-X POS , ARGtJ-V FOB, ARG44-ADDRESS OF 
B.D.B, ARGttS-ADDREBS OF BUFFER FOR BACKBROUND. 3-ERABE 

SPRITE - ARS#2-ADDRE5S OF BUFFER FOR BACKGROUND. NO RANGE 
CHECKING IS CARRIED OUT 60 ANY OUT OF RANGE VALUES CAN AND 
HOST LIKELY MILL CAUSE THE SYSTEM TO CRASH; 



RESTORE 310O3I DFF SEB-323520i Z2Z2-0 

READ DiIF JKJ-1 THEN POKE 111Z , Di 11 12-1 J 11*1 1 BOTD 31001 

RETURN 

DATA 76,84,0,0,72,231,233,254,34 

DATA 110, 0,10,34,17,12, 129, 0,0 

DATA 0,0,103,0,0,30,12,129,0 

DATA 0,0,1,103,0,0,30,12,129 

DATA 0,0,0,2,10S,0.0,4A,7bi 

DATA 223,127,255,73,94,76,117,160,0 

DATA 76.223,127,255,78,94,78,117,32 

DATA 41,0,4,34,41,0,8,32,109 

DATA 0,12,36, 103,0, lft, 160.13,74 

DATA 223,127,233.78,94,78,117.36,103 

DATA 0,4,140,12,74,223. 127,235,78 

DATA 94 ,7B, 117. 192,0,0,5.95,77 

DATft 63,73,79,0, 126,0,5,133,128 

DATA 0,3,229,128,0,3,49,0,0 

DATA -1 



Tagr 6-lusue J2 43 






ST Sacrata »«>»' 

by 
colh cur. 



GRAPHICS part ow - ARTICLE TWO - L1ST1NB THfttii 
(ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE] 
PAGE i. MAGAZINE - ENH HMD 



init 


- IflOOO 


driit ipnlt 


- *0<IQfi 


•r iE«_ipr i t e 


- fWJC 



Thia cod* n4* to »11om -for th* f4tt that Haba "C" trmti all M-(i*»«nt» a* 

long word*. Tun cod" giv*n h»r* tik.i iccnunl of thJt fml. Alao th. <ict 
that Hab* -C only allow* th* "*• of DO , PI , AQ trd Ai la takan into 

account. If yoi hava a -noT#al ■ C than u» th* a*»*will y I angiiaga liatinO. 
givM In Lifting 4. Tl,ii rnd> may Hart u" <>(-h*r nDn.tind.ri) "C"-* - if 
Lilting * do**" " t work tt>*n try thi« - it "*y &» th* Mtlir. U*4ga o^ »ith«r 
rnutinl l< BMactly th* *aa*. 



.:»■: 
. 91 aba I 

_ini t_] iltll 
mnvam. I 
. Hard 
■dvm. I 
rti 

.global 
_dr*w_apri t» 
link 
MVID,I 

•av>.l 

aav*. 1 

BOVB. 1 

HDVIi ] 

. Hur <J 

■DVH. 1 

mil k 
rti 

.olotjal 

_■ ■■■_*prtt« 

1 Ink 

*OVH. 1 
iSVI. ■ 
.word 

unlk 
rt. 



jmt Itnu 

**+ f f *,-t*|Sf 
Init 

lspt*,»*7f M 



_dr *w_«pr i ta 

B(afc) .do 
12(461 ,dl 

1 -. :«Ai ,iA 

driH_i(]ri t w 

■A 



rrm aprlt* 

ai.IKi 

ttf f f*,-t»p> 

■Tin tfirl t» 
HapH-.lWTfHUf 

■6 



I T*kt MgiPMnt. 

I Global «a that othir routin*a 

4 link nay icchi it* 

I Savi rnjlftari 

I Cal 1 Lifia-ft "IHfT- 

g Raster* rtgi, 

I Cast loull 



f Global . . 

I Puani A6 and gat point*!" to arga. 

I Bav* rage. 

■ X SQ-ordlnat* in DO 



5.U.H in AO 
Uu4tar in A2 
Call Lin*- A ' 
ftKtnri ra«». 
R*fttor« At 
Py*' 



in PI 



L.KOW SPRITE" 



[ Global 



Puah fl* and g»t point *T tea »rj, 

Bav* Ftaa*- 

B*t bu-f-tmr in A2 

Call Lln*-A "ERASE SPRITE-" 

RHtn r*oa. 

RHtor* A4 

TIC END. 



i«intii(t»»ut 



ST 



»cr*t» »*r !»■. 

"y 

CDLM CD* 



GRAPHICS part ona - ARTICLE TWO - LISTING FDUR 
(ASSChM.* LAMBLtAHE) 
PAGE o HfiljA/l*: - ENGLAND 



init 



driH 



_»pri t* 

1 r ■ ta 



*AQW 
•flOOO 
tflGGi: 



Thi* coda provldam th* int*rfaca Hfor th* awjority Pf "C"a advailabl* for tha 
ST, Thia cod* Will net work with _ HABfl C" - ■■■ Liatlng S for th* riqulnd 
cpda. If you *r* uniun a* to wfiich -cod* tn try, try this fir at - It 1» unit 
likaly to WJTk - If thia cod* down, ■ t ™=rk and you ar* aur* that Lilting & la 
cnrHt thPO try Luting 3. If tt>i a do*an ' t work and you ar* PUT* y°" ' ™ got 
nn typa - * - than 1 can b* cflntlEtKl #t th* addrau at th* and Of tha artiol*. 
But plaaaa Includ* a S.A.E! 



. taut 

. gl Dbal 
_lni t _1 i n*a 
an van. 1 
. Mordi 

mavtm. 1 

rta 

.global 
dr*w_*pri t* 

link 
aovaa. 1 
■ova. 1 
mciv*. J 

apva. I 
. word 

HhH. 1 

unlk 
rta 

.global 
_*r aa*_apr it* 
link 
mo vera 1 I 
navi. I 
■ word 

MDVIP. 1 
lil k 

rtm 



_lmt_l In" 

rtCH7 /aO-a* , - i ap P 
Lnit 

4*p l*,(|O-d?/a0-at 



_driH_ipr 1 ta 

dO - d7 ^ aO -ao , - < *p I 

Staai) ,d0 
IOU01 ,dJ 
12 (at) .40 
Lii ail ,42 

driH_ipri t* 
lap ) ■+ , aO ■d7-'a0 a* 



•ra»»_«prita 

aa>,M 

UV-dT/iD-ii,- tap) 
H :-;,; ,*3 
**■ aa*_ap r i t a 
Hap » ■» ,dO--d7/aO <^ 



j Taxt a*o**#nt . 

I Olobai an that Othar rnutimi in 

t link nay ace*** It, 

I 9ava rvgiatar* 

, Call Lina-A -INIT- 

I Raator-* r*gi. 

t C r **t tout 1 

; Clonal . . 

I Puah AA and g*t polnt*r to argp. 

I Bava radl. 

I jf cn-ordlnat* in 00 

j ¥ " " in Dl 

I S.D.B in AO 

I BuM*r In AZ 

, Call Lin*-A "DRWa SPRITE" 

j Rwfttora raga. 

t RWa'tQT* Ai 

! BV*? 

I Global . - - - 

I Puth 04b and q*t point ar tn arg. 

1 a*va Haga_ 

I 9*t buff*r 111 AI 

t C4ll Lin*-A "ERA3E SPRITE* 

I Has tor* f vg>. 

I HaEtDrr A& 

I THE END. 



DESIGNING THE 
SOFTWARE 

That's tht- hardware registers but, as 
with mosi computers, ihc most 
important area is the software interface 
between the hardware and the user. 

The ST has more than its fair share of 
software supporting the impressive 
specifications outlined at the start of this 
article. I aim CO start at the lowest level 
and work up to the heights of GEM, but 
we must first discover how the ST 
stores the data it uses to represent what 
we see on the screen. In montjehrome 
mode, each bit of each word represents 
the state of a pixeL A bit at means that 
pixel is off, a bit at 1 means the pixel is 
on - see Figure 1 . 

In medium resolution, things become 
more complicated, the ST uses the 
screen memory in a different way to the 
norm. See Figure 2 for a pictorial 
explanation. Two contiguous words are 
'joined together' - bit of word and 
bit of word 1 combine to give a two bit 
value which is then mapped onto the 
appropriate colour register. In low 
resolution, the same applies but in this 
case 4 contiguous words are used - see 
l-'igure 3, 

* Now you know how the ST stores its 
screen data, but where does it store it? 
As I stated above, the screen tan be 
moved in memory, however on power 
up the ST determines the amount of 
memory available and then takes 32767 
from the address of the last usable byte. 
In a 512K system the last usable 
memory address is S7FFFF, I7FFFF- 
32767 = S780O0 therefore the 520ST 
places its screen at location S78000, 
So, you can now access the screen 
directly with POKE commands. But 
wait! Didn't you buy the 16 bit ST 
because it was one of the most powerful 
computers available? And here you are 
using a POKE command to access 
graphics - there must be an easier wayf 

USING LINE A 

The Line A interpreter is a feature 
common to all 68000 systems. When the 
68000 encounters an instruction 
beginning with $A, such as &A0O0 it 
generates an 'exception' (I hope to 
discuss exceptions in a future article). 
The ST jumps to a section of code 
which interprets the meaning of that 
op-code. The Line A commands can be 
made to do whatever you wish and* on 
the ST, they are the ground level 
graphic interface. 



44 Page 6 - Issue 32 



STRATEGIC PLUS SOFTWARE 



P O BOX 8 
HAMPTON 
MIDDLESEX TW12 3XA 



ALL ATARI ST TITLES 



STRATEGIC 
PLUS 

SOFT WAR E 



DUNG EON MASTER fFTL) 1he lann-aworleu rele-playlng game from the 
producers of 'Syi-nJog' has finalty amwcil 1 megabyte of anltt-iaied graphic! and 
dgiljjnd sound has bean compressed anlo a single 1/2 megabyte disk, lo flrv» us 
posaitsly THE adventuri game of the yenM 'Real-lime' action requires life-like 
detiiiohs to bo mads ab*u! yotif parry, as they grow tired or hungry, or are 
confronted by traps, puzzles or monsters. YCXJ are therel CfwKne up to four party 
member* of diff erem types Trtsm the selection round In the 'Hall o* Champions' or 
design ygu pwn. Superb graphics And excellent use ol the mouse, allow easy aocess 
lo individual party memberi and their various weapons, okahsa, armour end 
accoutramenis, Highly detailed 30 view of lhe corridors e-nd nnmi of 1he dungeon* 
and |h» animated monsters appear In from oi you during combat! Unlgue magic system 
■equires io^ic end actual practice, lo discover and master these all ImportarH 
sprlljl Comes highly recommended and a must for the serious adventure gamer" 

1 Piayer Designed by D«jg Bell, Mike Newton, Denis Walker Pt'lC0 ,„„,, £29.95 

UNIVERSAL MILITARY SIMULATOR (Rainbird) - a revcfuiionary n** 
concept in the design and preteniatlon of warn amlng on lhe compular. Designed to 
alia* the gamer lo create any hrslerkal of ftctitJDUs battle Shai they may wtih lo 
simulal*. E^jery aspect of the program can be modified of designed, from lhe 
battlefield io lha time seals, Unique 3D perspective views of lie oaltletjsld with 
'loom-m' lialura and rotation erf the baltlefisld. Full use d mouse and me'nii 
syjlem, with tome optional keyboartf commands, gives a vary my to use command 
tytSem. Players can ellhw* opt lo play with lull Conlrol ol 1he units, or lo taks 
me role oi army commanoTpr and issue overall directives., win !he computer handling 
movement «n<j combat. Come* with 5 built-in seenafiot: Arbela [331 BCl hasting*. 
(10661, Ma/slon M*sr (184*1). Waterloo (1S15) and Geflysburg (1863), Games, maps and 
-fills c*n all be saved and *'e all interchangeable between each oiner - Alexander 
rights CroniwBlt al Gettysburg! Include* printout and Hl-fies (mono) monllor optionj. 



EMPIRE {lnter*ttj|) - a grand strategy game, that although very 
Smote lo play, has become One of lhe mosl eddlciive strategy games ne have off ered 
on any computer. Tha game commences with you owning one city, from whlcn you 
pioduce armies, aincrafl and If on lhe caul, tubmajtrwa, transport*, defrayers 
cruisers, tkuWesh-ps and carrier*, The surrounding met. Is unknown, therefore lhe 
initial slagea ol each game involve* exptoratlon and rinding ihe enemy. Combed It 
very simple and requires long-lerm planning, as atlacka must be earned oul In waves 
lo succeed. Graphics are also simple end straight-forward, w*|h lhe mouse and menus 
being used lo their full effect, The game rum on « semi-real lime tyitim, with 
orders being gmwi, when either trie Inilial oidens have bean completed by Ihe unlit 
or units come Into contact wttn btocldrvg terrain or enemy units. Feature* Include 
amphibious landing*, automallc patrol ol aircraft and ships, movement of 'blocks' of 



units and a complete design of your own map kit, In addition 1o the varied maps 
included In lhe game, Tw*o level* of ploy in addition lo Ihe variable production a 
combat levels, fti-res fjnono) monitor oplion. 

1-3 players 



7i pi ion 
Designed by Inlenitel 



Price 



£43.00 



1 -2 players 
Other titles 



Designed by D Ena Sldran 



Price E24.95 



The range of board assist wargames from 
SIMULATIONS CANADA now available on ihe Atari ST: 

GOLAN FRONT - battalion level game of the Arab/Israeli Ww 

in the North, 1973. Price £33 00 

GREY SEAS, GREY SKVS - modern tactical ship to »Np combat game, with " 

ships available Iron" naves ar-au.nd He wcrlci. Price ... E3S.M 

FIFTH E5KA0RA - modem day operational level game ot nava.lr'elr 

cnntlict in the Mediterranean, Price £33 DQ 

SEVENTH FUEET - modern day operational level gam* of naval/air 

conflict in the Pacific, Pric* £35 00 

STALJW5RAD CAMPAIGN - COrpS/anny level same of tn* German eampalflii 

rn the EoLitri on the Eastern Front, June IMS ■■ February 1945, Price E35.W 

|all Ihese games an* lext only and coma wllh) maps and play pieces) 



Bard's Tale (Electronic Aria) E24.95 

Fligh: Simulatof II (Sub- Logic) E42.D0 
FEN Scenery |>s»» No.7 and 1 1 eech "^O.OO 

Brtach fprnnitrendi £35,00 

9re«cn Scenario Disk fQmnilJend) ETBC 

Coming very soon 

Uliima IV fOrigin Systems Inc.) £24.65 

(junsriip [Micraproael K?4.95 

Kennedy Approach (Ulcreiprose( £24.95 

Carrisr Commend painbird) 524,85 



C RING 01-979-2987 W^\ 

Send £1 .00 lor our cataicfgue 
(redeemable with first order) 

All prices are Inclusive of VAT & P/P 



Other titles 



Wizards Crown (S&l 
" {SS" 
J* I 
iSI) 
W:i<vhius |Cr g n 3'^stfiS Ir.c.j 



ftngt Of tiffin 
Fioadwar EurG| 
Phanlasle 



Sll' 
Ope (SSI) 
iSSli 



Autoduel (Qriotn Systems Inc.) 
F-1S Strike Eagle (Mlcroprose) 



Ogre (Origin Systems hnc-t 



g.n : 
Sysli 



£Ld^.tW 

E?4F3fl 

C34.66 
£34.95 
ES4.65 

£24,95 



SUPERTEC LTD -computer solutions! 



Atari computef srslims nroilble from slock 
deTtiils. 



ALL MODELS - toll lor 




5?0 SIFM - 10*0 STF - MEGA SX7 & ST4 
HA&D DRIVES - MONITORS - PRINTERS 
ATARI PC's 
ATARI SLMSOJ LASER PRINTERS 



520 iitai wi*i N"cdIoui mvnillar ofily £520.QD 

inc VAT & dfllirorr!- 

AMSTtlAD PC 151 2 ALWAYS IN STOCK. 

Wa r»o»e fl foil ronge otAMSTSAO products available The PPC5 I 2 

& 640 portables ars- in hanvj demand. Drdaf jrourj riow lo ansij-e Aarly 
deliver*! Oderj oxa backing up lost o&< jours jn now! 

AMTER PC-S from f 4 99 {*« V AT) call for details 

FULL RANGE OF TAN0V COMPUTERS & PERIPHERALS AVAILHLF 
INCLUDING THE NEW H0Q LTPC LAPTOP 
TWIN 730 K DRIVE5.SUPER TWIST LCD SCREEN. INTERNAL 
NICAD RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES THIS 15 A QUALITY 

MACHINE AND THEIR GOING FAST! at £1100.00 inc VAT 

SUPERTEC IS A GENUINE ATARI. AfcSSTLSAD & TANDY 
DEALER. NOT JUST A POSTAL ADORESS.WE SUPPORT OUR 
CUSTOMERS WI1H QUALITY SERVICE AND BACKUP, OON'T 
COlvTARF US WITH 'BOX MOVERS', IF YOU K.NQW WHAT YOU 
WANT, WF WILL SUPPLY ON MAIL OR TELEPHONE 0BDERS. 

SUPERTEC LTD 

CDRNWALI IS HOUSE 

HOWARD CHASE 

BASILDON 

ESSEX 

SSI I 3BB 



TEL [0268) 282308 

OfEN 9 TO 5 PM MONDAY TO FRIDAY 
PERSONAL CALLERS WELCOME -WE HAVE I" 
SYSTEMS ON UEMO FOR YOU TO TRY 




PC & ATARI ST based DESK 
TOP PUBLISHING syiHems 
from Mirrorsoft [FLEET 
STREET PUBLISHERl - TIME- 
WORKS DTP - Soft Logilr. 
(PUBLISHING PARTNER)- 

Speciol offers on MEGA ST 

Loser DTP systems! 

Call for daloils 



Dont be q DINOSAUR - move to the best and easiest 
micro's to use. You con easily pay three times (or more] 
os much, for the so colled "INDUSTRY STANDARD' 
computers and sjfll not get o system as good. 

THIS AD WAS PRODUCED ON AN ATARI LASER! 




COMMODORE AMfOA A500 with joftwors starter pack' 
aril, £449.99 in* VAT & delivery 

or A50 * A T 084 colour manlier forgnlj E 699. 99, again I his 
includes delivery, VAT & the schwa-re- pack! 



PRINTERS - PLOTTERS MODEMS DISC DRIVES HARD DRIVES 

- CA8LES - MONITORS and 5DFTWARE! 

We can suu-ply Hems from the following manulocturersr 

Pansonic - Mltro Peripherals - Eptart - HroUier - Philips - Monnasmcmn 

Tolly Roland - Tondoti - Miniscribe Star Miaronies - Amsk-od - Akbtw 

- Miracle Technology - Cumgna - Eidersoft - and marry; rnorfl 
JUST CALL AND ASK! 
**»*«ttrt**tttti*ttt* 

COME FOR A CHAT ABOUT YOUR NEEDS, 
YOU WONT BE GIVEN THE HARD SELL, BUT 
WE WILL TRY TO HELP. 



J'ape ft- Ksuc M 45 



^^^^^— — 



There are 1 4 Line A commands, all of 
which lake the form of: 
SAOOX 
however for the 'C and ST Basic 
programmer most of these commands 
duplicate some of the functions 
provided by the VDI interface. To save 
space, 1 will examine only those that add 
worthwhile extensions to the ST. Of the 
14 Line A commands, only three are 
significantly different. These three 
commands are 'Initialise Line A', 'Draw 
Sprite' and 'Krase Sprite 1 

As the Line A interface is essentially 
an aid to assembly language 
programmers, access from 'C or ST 
Basic is not easy but I have included the 
necessary code to allow you to use these 
functions from your 'C or ST Basic 
programs, 

I will now discuss the three 
commands - but first, I must explain a 
Hoi Spot! The Hot Spot is a point of 
reference on a sprite determined by the 
programmer. When the Draw Sprite 
command is given, the x and y 
co-ordinates refer to this point on the 
sprite. Let's take an example. Suppose 
the hot spot is defined by the 
programmer to be in the centre of a 
sprite. All subsequent Draw Sprite (x,y) 
commands will draw the sprite with the 
co-ordinates x,y at the sprite's centre, 

THE LISTINGS 

Listing I shows how to use multiple 
screens from ST Basic, Listing 2 
contains a basic loader which allows the 
user to access Line A Sprite functions 
from ST Basic and also shows how this 
utility may be used. Listing fj is 'C 
source code which shows how to use 
Line A from 'C Listing 3 is the 
required binding for HABA C. Listing 
4 is the binding for 'normal' C's - see 
my article last issue describing the need 
for the two listings- Finally, Listing 5 is 
an assembly language demonstration of 
how to access Line A sprites. 

That's about it for this issue - next 
time I'll be taking a l™k at more 
features of ST graphics such as raster 
forms. Good luck with Line A which is 
a very powerful feature allowing quick 
and easy access to the powerful graphic 
features provided by the ST. 

As I mentioned in the last issue, if 
you are having any trouble in using any 
of the code I have included with my 
articles, I can be contacted at Calm 
Cox, 10 Graigue Court, Poppintrte, 
Rally mun, Dublin 11, Eire but 
please, please please include a S.A.El 



DESCRIPTION OF LINE A COMMANDS 



INITIALISE LINK A 
Line A 

opcode: SA00O 
Input; None 

Deser iptiont This opcode must be 
executed before any other Line A 
opcodes are given. The function of this 
opcode is to initialise the areas of 
memory used by the Line A system. If 
you dun'r execute this opcode, none of 
the other opcodes function correctly - 
you have been warned! 



DRAW SPRITE 
Line A 

opcode: &A00D 

Input: Address of a Sprite Definition 
Block in AG 

Address of a buffer in A2 
X-Position of sprite in DO 
Y-Pusition of sprite in Dl 
(AO,A2,D0,Dl are 68000 registers) 
Description: This command draws a 
16x16 pixel sprite at the screen location 
contained in DO and Dl. The actual 
definition of the sprite is held in a 
Sprite Definition Block", who's layout I 
have described below. The size of the 
block is always 74 bytes long. The 
buffer's size is dependant on the 
resolution you are working in. It's 
function is to retain the image under the 
sprite, so that when the Erase Sprite 
function is called, the background can 
be restored, thus erasing the sprite. 

ERASE SPRITE 
Line A 

opcode: SA00C 

Input: Address of buffer in A2 
Description: This command restores 
the area under a sprite drawn with the 
Draw Sprite command. 



BUFFER SIZES FOR DIFFERENT 
RESOLUTIONS: 

High res 74 bytes, Medium res 138 
bytes, Low res 266 bytes 



SPRITE DEFINITION BLOCK 

Word 0: X-Offset to Hot Spot (from 

top left corner) 

Word 1: Y-Offset to Hot Spot (from 

top left corner) 

Word 2:0 

Word 3: Background colour 

Word 4: Foreground colour 

Words 5 to 36 hold the actual definition 
of the sprite are held, along with a mask. 
The mask h an area slightly larger than 
the sprite within which the sprite exists. 
If you wish to sec this effect at work, 
move the mouse pointer over a black 
area of the screen. What you are seeing 
is the white mask with a black arrow 
inside it. 

Word 5: Mask line 
W T ord 6: Definition line 
Word 7: Mask line 1 
W T ord 8: Definition line 1 



Word 3S: Mask line 15 
Word 36: Definition line 15 



OH&ANISATIOH OF 4CAEEN UEMMY OH ST 



Manocb"S>m« 




t i i i i i h i n 



d 



tti i i tr 



d 



TT 



wonp ° 



f njT I ? h U ! a I s I t rjjFjjJkitaaailL-L-LLl- 1 I I I I 1 S-J-U-IJ ■ M ill] " 




Colour ■ LS* HniWitn 




r 1T1ll1llll "" m 



rTTTTT 



L-tKnrt Off] I 



mi - Co*h* Pma ii 



46 PageG-liBucJZ 



] II ■ 

1 » SI i.rr.1. .rr in 

1 * by 

; ' COLM LU: 

J ■■ GRAPHICS pm-i oni AKIn:i I 1HI! I i:;i IKr P I VI 

; • mEEEMBLV LANGUAGE] 

I i PAGE i. HAGAJINE ENGLAND 

j •»«it«(«MIMIHt»»ltlH«tUHtii>illiil •««■< 

[KIT L[»EA ■ I4WG0 ; I mi A nprndfi 

Cflftw SPBI IE - HtOOD 

LHA&E.HTtlTEa WWOC 

TOP * | UD-nrn"i nataa (H icri«fi cornara. 

BOTTOtl ■ Ml'. | Adjutt to lUkt rHDhuttWI you 

LtFT ■ , .,. urtm, in. 

RIGHT • i2J 

."III ; T.HT ugi_n< 

.□LOBAL NAIN ; Prnqrn rndi itirli Mff| 

_PtAIN 

MDV£.M »C F 1_H3» | InltlllH h,y III! am Ml — 

"Ovi, h m h r_pce 

P1DVE.H n,K_IIE , IniliLln :, , y iner m n tm 

HOVE.U tL.TIMC 

. yofw Lnii i. IM.H | inltilm Line f tar utiqt 

WWW.LUIP- p ir... <.,.. • I.. 

"Dvt,* *_PD&,BJ t *t I PDG.'fPOG 

HOVE.H i FtK.DO 

POVC.L WttHl.llt.lK) I 5h*pa In BPHJTE DEF 

HDVE.L *BFR[TE_SFYiai'.A2 

-UCfHJ DHhH_Sf*|T( | living I I n. a apcod. tHW 

J5R DEL Ay ; ir.l ,l,l„ 

nUVE.M 31 POSiDO t Incraaapnt x ca-ordknat* 

AOD.W J [ML. DO 

HOUE.U L*J,)I_MJS 

m .« ». i' i , ix:- i p*tt [Ht adqa? 

BLT KHmCE.H t Yaa - eorraet it 

DT.II KieHT.K FOS i Paat right .d,. 

BHT BDUNC£_) f .., - corrmt It 

i.W*_0K i JC co-ordlnata o* 

VCD y.Ftls.BO f Hon incriHfit v CO-OTdlnil* 

ADD. I* r,I«C,EO 

HOVE.H DO,r PES 

ChP.I* »tdp;t_pw , » a . t tap ■4g*-> 

H.T KlWPi.r i Tat - corract it 

CHF.M DBOTTCWItT PUS ; Baltn Inl Inn ■ 

EPQT HXHH.r ~ i tmm - cnrract it 

y_F<D9_r* j icthi ii*y co-ord L nataa. Mi. 

pajVE.L *6PiMTE_S(WE,A2 t Haatora tha haekgrourid 

.UOffll ERASE .SPRITE 
SCAN km} | Scan tha kaybnard 

rtOvf.N aaUF , - rtPPJ 

NDVE.H Bi,-i5P> | J. In, QErlBOS lunrlinn HflnVilHli; 

TRAP 11 

ADW.L M,S* 

Dt>.t »o,t>C | Any kaya u- aaaad J 

SEC DMA* LOOP t HS th_n r.-dr.b> ipn » 

CLR.U -I3PP | Kay m aaa ai l - asit tn dnltiv 

mw ai 

■DUfCE.T 

NEB.kl K INC , Lat 1 IMC - -X IHC 

HQVE.M (_PD!I,PD 

ADC, a ■ ni ..:i.. | Add :•) [K to i PEJE 

ALW.H K_INC,B0 

HOVE-H L0.1_PDS 

HW I.PDE.DT | Now X PCS la Ot, 

■OHCIY 

NEH.N I 1 INC | Lat r iM. '. -V DC 

hUVE.H V_PQg,D0 

SUO.H >~[NC.D0 | Add Imf INC In r POB 

ADD. Id V_INC.U0 

ptMi,K ».*_*tre 

PB* « PUS DK I Max f_PCG la ok< 

■ • E LI B Ft O U TIMES 

DELAY I thort tfalar - adluat tha langth and 

NDvE.Iri a3BD4 a D0 | ofcaa^v* tha affact on tha aprita vpintt 

LODP 

EHJBlH 41. DO 

sme ugga 

■n 

-Mi I Varlabla Sturaga Bauaaant 

l.PDfi .5PBCE 2 | All I «ord luiiu 

y_P06 .SPACE 1 

■ IlK .SPACE 1 
I.IK -SPACE 3 

SPRITE _SAui -mi'bi:i ./i.i. i ft.i.r.p jt,t. bytaa Jar niciigrmjnd u<t 

-DATA t Bit- Stm-.g. ::.,™nl 

SPRITf_MC ,-TJBD !*nl. 1 1. 1 in. t | ,ir, K L Bl > 

.UDFIDr | Altar at your Dan mi 1 

.HORfl a 
-UtaiD- o 
-HORB 1 

.HfWb aFFFF , *FFFF . if f FF,*BO0l ,»FFFF, aOoai ,a*frp,ao<»] 

IFvflF , HJOn I .aFOOF,*Eloai,«Fi!)oF,a(a|Kll,aF(MF,*Bm>l j V"< 
• FOOF.iOOOl .*! Dm ^IHnD^ayooF.aiKNHHtFOOF^aaOl g Hmtm. 
•FFFTF , toon I , *FFFF , *EK»! , *FFFF . tDOOl , tFFFF , tFFFt 



■lift ■ '3 All I i:ir; 



'a 






5T &»fat» aariaa 


*t 


■"a 






by 


«/ 


f« 






LCtrl CGI 


• / 


tr 




U«U*Hlt 


S nart Din - RPTICLE TWO - LIBTINB S[H 


f* 






■c - 


■ f 


/■m 






rmn t, nAliM/[i« i hHii ANn 


»s 


Idi P L na 


l.l'll III', » 




v* Muabar a* lp^ita* 


«/ 


adaJina 


TOP D 




I* V Lfl--iil i dtftJta* dilirilrig *«h * «1 h V vilut - 


• ' 


>U.(lii. 


EOT TON Ml 




VI fldjui-l +n «ul+ rwinlutitwi yrnj"r» unrhing in 


1/ 


• H^' : r.f 


LEFT 




r"a Eaaa lor K ££>-ordiriat** 


«' 


*d«-tir,« 


RIGHT iJJ 









uniL|np4 ahort flirittEJ-ID^ifiiDil, 

0" FFFF , 0*:FFFF ,OnFFTFr t <ir. BOO I , On FFFF , 0* BBOJ , OnFFFF .OkCHKI , 
On FFFF , 0* B33J .OeFFFF .Ok&AAL . L'h FFFF , Ua 355 ] , diFFFF , liiaW] , 
fti FFFF , OvBaai h HiiFFFF ,IJ.»AA| .□> FFFF ,0~«33l ,DxFFFF F ny«AB| , 
U»l I I I ,'lall(KM ,<i.P I I I ,;).m>!JI L ll«l I I I , fl-MTHlS .fl.FFFF ..l.FFFfl | 



ahDTt Hi []>{1,O f 1 ,1 ,0,2,2,0.31 i 
ahort >i [ )-U , 1 ,0,2- T I r <j.l ,I.i)J, 

Char li. t F.gr uund [ SPFl [ TE-S ] 1 Sii ] | 

.h»-t HlBFUITItt^itaaitTllSn 



ca ■,,,., ta 

/* Da4 inLtifin 

,f IlDCl 

*a altar |P you 
*a ht ah 

llw 4 Bfir a tn 



f* *m»rv» Ping -y to M^a 1 Oaci'vTOMnd* 
Fa Ca-ordinata* of Fflritti 



■Kill n ihurt LmiL nil 

"ir 
( 

iiliur 1 || 

L-0| 

i r i< I n.i !: ; 



" ' , 



ritiii qpraia.apri tati | 



EltariKlF ■,' 



SITES; i ttJ 



I[|I-KZ3| y[ I ]•■•!«■ 



-on unmoi 



/■ InltalLaa Liu-fl for migi - P4UST DC 



J* Inltallaa co-o^diFi*!** OF ajyrltaa 



/• lain loop 



da thia 2OO0 linn 



ilr ih mpr Lin* I > - t 



rra«F_aprl taa ' P | 



.'■ Dr.u, 

F« Mr.-* and 

|F* Eraaa - alnpla 1 



»F 

»F 



for (I 19| 1 <BF>fi[TEBU**l 

*-~_npr,t,(»Fl |,y[ [J, »fjrit». 



e karouodt 1 )( J P i 



aiml ijiritnfj 

■( 

* DT ! I ■A] I <IiFni TES I 1 »* P 
I 

.r.]t-,i(ii p (luffing 

IflalllMHaKT ;: IIIKLEFT) 

I rilEl I"-Hllll[ illl-uuli], 

H (jll JJ-BOTTOH IS vIiHTOP) 

I yi(|] — v-mi, jii."»iiiii 
I /* boundary 

I 

■rill aaritaai!) 

+ /a Hotai TiT* iprltai in araaad In 

*or I I -SPfriTEB-Lj 1 >»0l 1 — i f* rmvmrmm vdflr - «» what hjppwii 

■riiiijiriiidiiKPtyiHiiKDIglli'i H Ukafr rt ariipd in tha iih 

I t* tut 0#dW# at liSay wara drawn. 





■r* 


nr-t 


■ ; 




F-* 


«*ch 


*/ 




/* 


ta|jr k 1. * 


■ .■ 


>(i]f-m.[j]| 


. /a 


.n-iidtt- 


■ / 




tfB 


+ HL-. 


F/ 


VEI y+*fAC-3| 


r r'. 


wcr««n '■■ 


■ / 






THAT'S ALL FOLkS ' 



COMPETITION WINNERS 

Here art the winners of our recent competitions. 

Winner of the Supra Hard Disk drive for his XL is C. 
Gammie of Liltlctmmptan, West Sussex who will be enjoying all 
that extra power on his 8-bit by now. Runners up who received 
The 1ST XLENT Word Processor or XLENT ST software were 
I*.W. Henderson of Co. Antrim, S,L. Gil bey of Bensim, Oxford, 
A. Fitter or Birmingham, RJ. Collins from Bristol, GV. Stone 
from Sel>, luii, Notts, 1*. Rixon of Shefford, Beds, R- LcBttigue 
from IN'tin h.iois. { ]hris Read of Milton- Keynes, Mrs Jenny 
Martln from OrpinkgHjo und T. Wralght from Grantham. 

The main prize winners in the JafticS Bond competition were 
S,F. Holinshead from St. Ives, D. Black From Co. Cork, R. Tubb 
from Birmingham, A, Dufiin from Co Louth, M. Borobin from 
Walsall, R* Walker from Acomb, Yorks, C Hearn from Tring, 
Herts, H. Beaver from Gosprt, Hants, G, Bates from 
iMersevslde and M. Hewson from Birmingham, Twenty others 
received runners up prize*. 



Paige 6 -Issue 32 



47 




DEFENDER 
OF THE CROWN 

Is Mindscape's 'Interactive 
fiction' as good as they claim? 
John Sweeney checks it out 



Defender of ihe Crown is billed as a 
"Cinemaware Interactive Movie". The 
box claims it is a "unique blend of role 
playing and strategy combined with 
dazzling arcade-style sequences". First 
impressions are certainly excellent. 
Without any doubt the graphics are 
superb, and as the game progresses and 
new pictures are displayed one is always 
suitably Impressed by them. There is 
also lots of stirring music which is of a 
very high standard. 

The main screen of the game is a map 
of England in 1 149. This is divided into 
19 territories which can provide you 
with income for your treasury and 
vassals for your army. You and two 
other Saxon Lords hold three of the 
northern territories. Three Normans 
hold three of the Southern territories. 
On each turn you may choose from a 
number of options, such as spending 
money on soldiers, knights, siege 
catapults or castles for newly conquered 
territories; holding a joust; raiding an 
enemy castle or attacking an adjacent 
territory. Further sub menus provide 
you with such options as examining the 
various territories and lords or moving 
men between garrisons and armies. All 
this is achieved with the mouse, as 
indeed is everything in die game .the 
box refers to a joystick option - but it 
doesn't appear to exist!). The computer 
resolves your moves and takes the turns 
for the other five Lords as you try and 
defeat the Norman invaders and make 
England safe again under your rule. 

You and the other Lords each have 
three characteristics measured: 
Leadership, Swordsmanship, and 
Jousting Ability. These affect your 
chances in most stages of the game, and 
are in turn affected by how well you do, 
for example, Leadership goes down if 
you lose a joust, but if it is high can have 
a significant affect on the outcome of a 
battle. 

As described so far the game is a fairly 
simplified strategic war game with the 
computer playing the part of games 
master and rolling lots of 'dice' behind 



the scenes, however, certain actions by 
either you or one of the computer 
players result in "arcade style 
sequences'. There are four of these - 
Jousting* Raiding, Catapult Sieges, and 
Battles. 

When Jousting, you must aim at your 
opponent's shield as he gallops towards 
you and press the button exactly when 
you hear a clang. Raiding requires you 
to win two sword fights during which 
you can move your character left ot 




wm n i 

t4t«HJct IS 



right and thrust or parry. With Catapult 
Seiges your main objective is to knock 
down as much of the wall as possible in 
7 attempts - to fire you just press the 
button when you think the catapult is 
wound down far enough. Finally, in the 
Battles you select options such as 
Defensive Hold or Outflank Enemy 
while soldiers stand and wave swords at 
each other in the middle of the screen. 

Apart from various random events 
causing a few other pictures and 
messages to appear, and your ability to 
ask Robin Hood for help three times 
that's about it. Unfortunately, most of 
the arcade sections are, in my opinion, 
somewhat lacking The only one which 
comes close to being an arcade game is 
the Raiding, but the options are too 
limited to make it worthwhile. Indeed, 
the only strategy which I or my sons had 
any success with at ail was to hit the 
Thrust button as fast as possible. 

Also, once you have seen the fairly 
limited range of pictures that make up 
the game, you very quickly get 
extremely bored with the loading time - 



waiting eight seconds to view a picture 
you have already seen and which is 
completely superfluous to the game is 
not my idea of "heart pounding action"! 
The Jousting is extremely difficult (1 
stil! haven't got anywhere near 
mastering it), and the built in delays 
make it, as far as 1 am concerned, 
unplayable - you get about two seconds 
to aim and hit, then well over thirty 
seconds waiting for the next attempt 
while it shows you two pictures you 
have seen before and then has to reload 
the jousting scene. Even worse, if you 
fail you are out of that joust and have to 
wait for a few turns before you can call 
another, or if you accidentally hit the 
opponent's horse you are banned from 
jousts forever and have to restart the 
game if you want to practice jousts. 1 
took the advice given in the instructions 
and tried to spend a game practicing 
jousts - on average I got two seconds 
practice every two minutes! What a 
waste of time! 

Why, oh, why did they not provide 
either an option to turn off the pictures 
you have already seen or to practise 
jousts without interruption - or 
preferably both? Ihe game is also 
lacking in any form of Pause or Save, or 
even the ability to turn the music off (no 
matter how good it is I don't want to 
hear it yet again - and I can't turn the 
volume down or 1 won't be able to hear 
the clang in the jousting!). 

The ability to suppress the numerous 
pictures which it insists on loading just 
to accompany a two line message or a 
sound effect MIGHT have made the 
game playable, but even then 1 don't 
believe it is actually a very g«>d game. 
The 'blend' of different types of game 
just doesn't work well. None of the 
components is fully satisfying in its own 
right but together they tend to detract 
from each other rather than help each 
other. Too much of your success in the 
strategical game depends on your 
success in the various 'arcade' bits or is 
affected by random events, As such it 
doesn't make a very goini strategy game, 
the 'arcade' parts are too limited, and 
the 'role-playing' element is practically 
non-existent. 

By all means marvel aL the graphics if 
you get the chance, but unless you don't 
mind it being a little shallow, and you 
have lots of patience, you might want to 
look elsewhere for your "heart pounding 
action" and "heroic battles"! 

Defender pf the Crown it published by 
Mmdscape and distributed by Mirrorsofi 
at £29,95 * 



4S 



Page 6 - Issue 12 



ST GAMES ST GAMES. ST GAMES 



FROSTBYTE 

Micro value.Tyneso ft 

|14.95 



Reviewed by 
John Davison jnr 



'Deep within the caverns of die planet 

Cosmia a lifetime struggle for freedom is 
being lost. Kreezers from all over the 
planet are being captured by the 
ghoulish monsters who inhabit the 
planet craters 1 

Your job in Frostbyte is to take on the 
task of rescuing the captured Kreezers 
from their cages, which are spaced well 
apart from one another in the 
underground caverns. You were also 
once imprisoned, but you managed to 
escape, and upon leaving your cage 
came across a form of gun which can be 
used to destroy some of the 'ghouls'. 

On your travels through the caverns 
and passages you will come across three 
different sorts of coloured 'sweets' 
which will enable your Kreezer to either 
move faster, jump higher, or fail further. 



BANK-IT 

Aaronfav Marketing 

£12.95 



Reviewed by 
Ron Stewart 



When any new computer comes on 
the market pJace there quickly follows a 
glut of those easy to program games that 
usually end up in the public domain. 
The ST seemed to avoid this area of the 
software market, mainly, I think, 
because of the time it took the average 
programmer to come to terms with 
sixteen bit computers. Some of these 
games are only now appearing on the 
market. I must hasten to add that I 
don't decry these products. Many of 
them, like BANK- IT reviewed here, are 
very creditable, I only wish that the 
programmers had been a bit more 
adventurous. 

BANK -IT is a mixture of fruit 
machine and poker game. The machine, 
which is totally mouse controlled, is 
equipped with five reels and hold and 
chance buttons. At the bottom of the 



These sweets will last indefinitely or 
until you pick up and use another sweet 
with a different effect. Also you will 
come across many different varieties of 
colourful monsters, some which will kill 
and some which won't, some which can 
be killed and some which can't. 




Graphically the game is very bold and 
colourful, although in some places the 
use of dithering (dots of different 
colours to make darker shades etc) has 
been overdone a little. The sound is 
quite good, and the twenty or so seconds 
of sampled music on the loading screen 
would be near enough perfect if it were 
not for the fact that it stops half way 
through a phrase. The sprites in the 



game, from your 'Slinky 1 like Kreezer to 
the hundreds of different ghouls, are all 
very colourful, and in most cases very 
smoothly animated. My only real 
complaints about the game are the 
difficulties which I had in getting it to 
load. To start with it would not load on 
my 1 meg drive, so I had to change the 
cables aruurtd to make my half meg 
drive Disk A. Secondly, when loading 
on the half meg it was rather 
temperamental and more often than not 
would 'bomb' out on first try. It usually- 
loaded on the second or third attempt, 
though. 

Overall 'Frostbyte' is a fairly 
reasonable platform type game which is 
priced relatively cheaply, however I did 
find that after playing it for a while it 
became a mite boring. This was because 
successive screens do not necessarily 
increase steadily in difficulty. Some are 
very easy and others are extremely hard. 
Difficult screens early on may cause loss 
of lives, making later screens more of a 
problem as you don't have spare lives to 
experiment with, Frostbyte should 
appeal to arcade adventure fans, even if 
it doesn't break any new ground in 
originality. 



screen are twelve poker hand selectors. 
You have twelve goes and each go is 
split into three spins of the reels. Each 

of the twelve poker hands is allocated a 
score and your aim is to amass a high 
score. 



WKHHB 



RftMpUtt 


I 


TO » 3 


ITOf (MtttIF I* N«U 

tmm HJ6I. FHtK^in 
mat T«GETH£R::35 
FMM •IFF£REJ11=23 


afftes 


* 


?r>m*r* 


FEUSIIflfS 


M 


II'OIMS 


CWltftKjf 


K 


4f>tit*IS 


EHt«ST3 


K 


SPOi*t* 


1 flfilt 


X 


tPaiNTS 



Game play is fairly simple. Pressing 
start spins the reels and once they have 
stopped spinning you can decide what 
sort of hand you want to go for, five 
cherries for instance, or maybe five 
penguins. Pressing the hold buttons 
stops those reels from spinning when 
you press start again. Once you've spun 
the reels three times the machine 
decides on how many nudges you can 
have. Finally when you have nudged as 
far as you can you select one of the hand 



buttons. The machine will then total 
your score. 

The machine may give you a chance 
to gamble on your score. Pressing the 
chance button may double your score if 
the light stops at Yes or it could halve it 
if it stops at No, More points can be 
added if you manage to get five of a kind 
or if you manage to light the makers 
name at the top of the screen. The 
hands have to be chosen carefully to get 
the highest points total. Four cherries 
for example will give you twenty points 
whereas if you select the four together 
hand, you get thirty-five points. There 
is a high score table which will save your 
high scores to the game disk. 

The graphics in this game are very 
well executed. I especially liked the 
LED read outs for the credits and score. 
The spinning reels are particularly well 
done. A game of this type does not give 
much scope for sound so don't expect 
anything flash, Bank -it is a good game 
for the younger computer user, it is easy 
to Icam and play. Anyone else will 
probably tire of it pretty quickly. It is, 
however, one of those games that is 
pulled down off the shelf once in a while 
iust to sec if you can beat your last high 
score. 



Pane * - [ssut J 2 49 



ST GAMES , ST GAMES ST GAMES 



• •♦# 



LAS VEGAS 
Anco 

£9.95 



Reviewed by 
John Davison jnr 

Las Vegas, as you can probably tell by 
the name, is a gambling game. The aim 
of Las Vegas is to break the bank at the 
casino by working through the Slot 
Machines, on to a game of 
'Higher-or-Lower' and finally on to play 
B lack jack with the chance to break the 
bank. 

The first section, the Slot Machine, 
resembles the screen from one of the 
modern gambling machines. The three 
reels arc in the centre of the screen with 
the start, gamble and hold buttons 
below. Across the top of the screen in 
large letters are the words 'Las Vegas'. 
Each letter must be lit up before you can 
move onto the 'Higher-or-Lower' game. 
All of the buttons on the machine are 



pressed by positioning the mouse 
pointer over the button and pressing the 
left button. 




Once you have made it to the 
'Higher-or-Lower* screen, you are 
presented with five cards face down in 
the centre of the screen. Below these are 
four buttons, a 'deal' button, 'higher*, 
'lower' and finally the 'change' button 
which enables you to change the first 
card dealt. You must then guess 
whether the next card in the sequence is 
higher or lower than that just dealt. If 



you succeed in getting all five cards 
correct you can either collect your 
winnings and return to the Slot 
Machine, or gamble. If you gamble and 
win you are given a number of chances 
to reach 8100 and therefore win the 
'Higher-or-Lower 1 game. If you do 
actually manage to win SI 00 or more, 
you can move onto the Blackjack screen 
(which I have not actually managed 
yet!). 

The Blackjack game is controlled in a 
similar way to the previous two sections, 
and if these are anything to go by, I 
would imagine that it is going to be 
pretty hard to beat the computer. 

'Las Vegas", although not very 
original, is a reasonably fun and 
addictive game with some bold and 
brightly coloured graphics. The sound 
is not really that good, apart from when 
you collect your winnings, when the 
tinkle of falling coins sounds 
surprisingly realistic. Overall, the game 
is quite good and worth the asking price. 



WINTER 
OLYMPIAD '88 

Microvalue Tynesoft 
£19.95 



Reviewed by 
Ron Stewart 

Winter is upon us and we are in the 
middle of the skiing season. This year 
also happens to be Olympic year and the 
winter games are being held in Calgary, 
Canada. With this in mind, Tynesoft 
have released Winter Olympiad '88. 

Included on the two game disks are 
five events. These are the downhill, ski 
jumping, slalom, biathlon and the two 
man bob. I mention five because other 
computers would appear to be getting 
six events. ST owners miss out on the 
speed skating. The two disks are chock a 
block so it would be difficult to see how 
they could have got another event on. 
You will even have to use another disk if 
you want to keep high scores. 

On loading you can select up to six 
people to participate. They can each 
compete for a different country and the 
computer keeps track of the events with 
a medals table. You can also select to 
compete in all the events or any 
combination of the five. 

The downhill is probably my 
favourite event of the five. The screen 
displays a large well animated skier from 



behind. On the way down the slope you 
will have to avoid the numerous pine- 
trees as well as jumping logs and rocks . 
Getting to the bottom is no easy task 
and a lot of practice is required, Because 
the skier is directly in front of you and 
can obstruct your vision the view 








- — ^^^^^^^—^. 

through his goggles is also shown at the 
bottom of the screen. A nice effect if you 
can handle both views at the same time, 
otherwise you will have to bob and 
weave a bit. The skier can be speeded 
up and slowed down by using the 
joystick. This means that once you have 
got the hang of the event then you can 
attempt to get faster and faster times . 

The ski jump starts with your skier 
walking out to the top of the jump and 
strapping his skis on. He then proceeds 
down the jump and takes to the air. 
Your task is to ensure he jumps at the 
correct time and then control him while 
he is airborne. A good display will get 
you style points. 

Slalom sees you winding in and out of 



the gates. The skier is very responsive 
and once again practice is required just 
to make it to the bottom. Control is 
unusual in that you can straighten the 
skier by pressing the joystick fire button. 

The biathlon takes you through some 
beautiful country on you way to the 
firing ranges. The joystick has to be 
waggled left and right, but not in the 
wrecking fashion of other games of this 
type, Shooting takes a fair degree of 
joystick control and timing. You will 
have to judge the fine line as to waiting 
to get in a good shot or to take the time 
penalty if you miss. 

The most disappointing event in the 
series is the bob sled. The start is good 
when the driver and brake man, with 
your joystick waggling assistance, run to 
get the bob going, but from there on 
things go downhill (sorry, but it had to 
come eventually!). The graphics are the 
poorest of all the events and the 
gameplay is not very exciting. 

Winter Olympiad begs comparison 
with Winter Games, Of the two I would 
prefer the Tynesoft product. Although 
it has less events it is easier to play and 
has none of the joystick bending 
contortions of the older game. 
Graphically the Tynesoft game comes 
out in front as well, if only because the 
larger characters are a little easier to see. 

If you don't possess a winter sports 
game and feel the need then I would 
suggest you go for Winter Olympiad. 



50 



Pftf e 6 - [n«f 32 



When you load Tangle wood you are 
presented with a control panel dotted 
with switches and dials surrounding a 
large black window which fills about 
three-quarters of the screen. If you use 
the mouse to dick on one of the 
numbered switches on the left of the 
screen the window immediately fills; 
with a colourful bird's eye view of a 
strangi: land. 

The land of Tanglewood is enormous. 
Roads and rivers criss-cross a variety of 
colourful landscapes and allow you to 
explore around 3,000 squares of the 
1 2,000 or so which form the grid across 
which your five robots, or, to be more 
accurate, your Mining Mobiles can 
travel. The roads and rivers lead to j 
variety of terrains such as lakes, 
swamps, forests and gardens - not to 
mention the Purple Cabbage Maze! 

The variety of terrains is one of the 
main challenges of the game - none of 
the mobiles are capable of travelling on 
all the terrains. The limitations of your 
mobiles art further complicated by the 
fact that they are all ropy second-hand 
equipment, bought cheaply by your 
uncle who wants you to recover some 
vital documents for him. They are either 
lacking in programs or equipment, or 
liable to break down at a crucial 
moment! 

It is very easy to start playing, Just 
pick a mobile and steer it round the 
roads or rivers with the mouse. You will 
discover lots of interesting places such 
as T'ngiian (the local inhabitants) bases 
and trading posts, matter transmitters, 
subways, telephone boxes, and, 
hopefully, a few useful items. One 
warning here, you MUST keep the 
sound on when exploring new areas or 
you will never find anything. A ping 
indicates a find. If you stop where you 
heard the ping then the item you have 
found will appear in a small window 
near the bottom of the screen. The game 
is completely mouse driven. Pointing at 
switches on the screen, pressing mouse 
buttons j and moving the mouse allows 
you to issue the equivalent of GET, 
EXAMINE, USE, DROP, SAVE, 
RESTORE, etc. You can also access the 
lists of programs and data which provide 
each mobile with its own special 
abilities, e.g. Number Three could use 
his Anti-Gravity Data to enter the 
swamp, if only the Gravity Reducer 
hadn't been lost in a lake during an 
earthquake! 

The graphics are so good that just 
exploring the main map and learning 
how all the mobiles work is great fun 
and would have provided a more than 
adequate adventure in its own right, but 
there is far, far more to Tanglewood. A 
aumber of the locations you attempt to 



TANGLEWOOD 



Microdeal 
£19.95 

Reviewed by 
John Sweeney 




enter will ask you to confirm R-P 
transfer. Once you accept this you will 
find yourself in a maze. There are three 
quite different types of these, each 
providing an excellent set of puzzles to 
solve. 

The Mines is a 'platform game'. You 
get a sideways view of a small area 
which scrolls smoothly as your mobile 
(visible in the centre of the screen) 
moves along the tunnels and up and 
down ladders and ropes, and 
presumably up and down the elevators 
as well if only you could get them 
working! The problem of mapping the 
mines is exacerbated by the fact that 
your lousy second-hand mobiles won't 
work properly. Number Three won't go 
down ladders. Number Two won't 
climb up ropes, and Number One has 
lost his mining data completely and 
won't even go in! Working out how to 
map the mines and get the three mobiles 
to co-operate to reach the final treasure 
is practically a fully-fledged arcade game 
in its own right! 

In the Forests, Under-water, the 
Swamp, etc. you get a completely 
different view. You now see what the 
mobile can see ahead of itself, and you 
move by using an arrow to indicate 
TURN LEFT, TURN RIGHT, 
TURN AROUND, or MOVE 
FORWARDS. Because of the severe 
limitations of your equipment all you 
can tell is the kind of terrain you are in 
and which directions have exits, i.e. this 
is the visual equivalent of 'You are in a 
maze of twisty passages all looking the 
same'! You are not allowed to drop 
items to mark locations, and even worse, 
the MOVE FORWARDS arrow, as 
well as causing movement CAN also, 
with no indication, cause a change of the 



direction in which your mobile is facing 
as he enters a new location! Mapping 
some of these is a nightmare! 

Somewhere deep in the Opposition 
Control Centre is the document you 
need in order to win the game. Again 
the view is different, now you are 
looking down the corridors of a three- 
dimensional maze. You can see walls 
and turnings ahead of you and also the 
Yellow and Red spots which mark 
Elevators. These mazes provide many 
challenges: the elevators won't all work 
for you and some are only one-way^ the 
mazes are enormous - covering well 
over 500 locations and when you get to 
the highest security area, your mobile's 
visual scanners start malfunctioning! 

Apart from the sheer problem of 
mapping the whole of Tanglewood, the 
game also has some excellent logical 
puzzles for you to solve, ranging from 
understanding the alien culture of the 
T'nglians to finding a way into the 
Walled Garden and, to add to the 
Arcade feel of the game, there is the 
problem of the enemy mobiles which 
zap yours, and the fact that you are 
racing against time. Don't be put off by 
that if you aren't into arcade games - 
you will soon discover how to avoid the 
enemy - and there's always 
SAVE RESTORE! - and it is possible 
to finish the adventure in less than half 
the allotted time, so it is not too much of 
a race once you have solved all the 
puzzles. 

As in most programs of this size there 
are a few minor bugs - watch out for the 
following rare occurrences and you 
should be able to avoid problems: 

Apart from Stones Crystals all other 
items are unique. If you rind a second 
one of anything it's probably best to go 
back to your last SAVE position. (If you 
find a T'ngiian Communications 
Protocol diskette deep in the mines then 
you should restart the game from the 
beginning - fortunately this appears to 
be extremely rare, neither I nor the 
writer of the program can reproduce the 
bug!). If the screen ever appears to be 
jumbled, or bits of things appear where 
they shouldn't be or you lose the mouse 
pointer, then you should reload the 
game and go back to your last 
RESTORE. You should be able to 
repair both holes - if your equipment 
vanishes after one hole then RESTORE 
and try again. 

Tanglewood really is quite an 
amazing game, with tremendous scope 
and lots of variety, Pete Lyon's graphics 
are impressive, and Ian Murray- 
Watson's program wij] keep you 
guessing. 1 thoroughly enjoyed it, I'm 
sure you will. Let's hope for lots more 
of the same, 



Page 6- Issue >2 



41 



5T GflflES ST GAMES ST GAMES 



• • •♦ 



MICRO-LEAGUE 

WRESTLING 
MLSA Microprose 

£19.95 



Reviewed by 
Ron Stewart 

The American company 
MieroLeague, who gave us sports fans 
ihe superb 'MicroLeague Baseball' have 
entered the sports market again. This 
lime they have released 'MicroLeague 
Wrestling'. The Americans have a 
tendency to assume that if someone is a 
champion in their country they are a 
world champion. ML Wrestling is 
endorsed by the World Wrestling 
Federation and it features 'World 
Champion' Hulk Hogan. Believe me, 
this is very much an American product! 

Initially you are given a choice of 
opponent*. Hulk Hogan can wrestle 
either Randy 'Macho Man* Savage or 
Paul 'Mr- Wonderful 1 Orndorff. You 
arc then treated to a ringside interview 
with both the wrestlers. This is 
conducted by a TV anchorman and each 
interview is supposed to come out 
differently, trouble is all three wrestlers 
make Frank Bruno look like John 
Geilgud! 

Onto the match. The top of the screen 
is given over to an area which contains 
digitized pictures of the action. On 
either side of the picture are eleven 



passible holds or moves for each 
wrestler. The game play consists 
basically of selecting a move for your 
wrestler with the computer or a friend 
selecting the move for your opponent, 
The computer then decides whose move 
actually took place and you are then 
treated to a picture of the action. This 
gives a semi-animated appearance to the 
play, rather like the old fashioned flick 
cards or the 'What the Butler saw' 
machines at the sea side. Each successful 




move increases your power and inflicts 
damage on your opponent- Both the 
power and damage levels are shown on 

the screen. 

While all this is going on a ring side 
commentary is being kept up by two TV 
announcers, This, like the interview at 
the beginning is just text on screen stuff. 
Neither of them are Kent Walton and if 
you haven't been to the States it will not 
mean a lot. 

Back to the bout. There are eleven 
moves to choose from. Five of them are 
considered basic, four are major and 
there is also a super move and a 
defensive block. Your wrestler 



obviously has a better percentage chance 
of making a basic move than a major 
move. The problem is that basic moves 
do not inflict much damage on your 
opponent, Once you have racked up a 
bit of damage and power then you can 
try your super move. Each wrestler has 
one of these favourite moves. If 
successful, and the percentages are 
heavily against it, you will inflict serious 
damage or even get a pin or knockout- 
Your chances of being successful in a 
hold can be gauged by the relative 
dominance meter on the screen You can 
also try a bit of nastiness, If you are 
lagging behind and the end of the bout 
is in sight then cheating can be your 
only way to get a win. For instance, 
Orndorffs* manager will try to hit the 
Hulk over the head with his stool. 
Beware, because actions like this can get 
you disqualified. 

An unusual program then. It is more 
of a strategy game than a joystick 
waggling contest. The screen display is 
unique. Seeing your moves: enacted by 
the actual wrestlers is fun. The problem 
is that the game relies heavily on 
personalities and unless you know the 
American wrestling scene the game 
looses that little something The sound 
does not come up to par. Applause from 
the crowd is just the usual static like 
noise. Not a sign of digital speech 
anywhere. 

MicroLeaguc Wrestling would appear 
to have limited appeal unless you are an 
avid wrestling fan. 



KARTING 

GRAND PRIX 

Anco 
£9.95 



Reviewed by 
John Davison jnr 

Karting Grand Prix from Anco is part 
of this companies 'budget' range of 
software, priced at just under ten 
pounds, The quality of this particular 
title is so poor that I find it difficult to 
think of any positive points about the 
game. 

The loading screen is quite good, 
showing a picture of a few karts on a 
track, but this is the most impressive 
thing in the whole game. Once it has 
loaded you are presented with a menu 
where you can select track conditions, 
number of players, sprocket size, and 
tyre compound. You can then select 



which track you want to start on. 

The screen then loads in and the 
sounds effects start. Just a long 
monotonous drone, which is supposed 
to sound like the roaring engines of the 
karts. The graphics are also dull and 
flat, being a bird's eye view of the whole 
track. The sprites (if you can call them 
that) are terrible and the animation is 
abysmal, being probably the worst to 
disgrace the ST's screen in a 
commercial title. 

The control of these small jerky 
blocks is equally distressing, as it is 
virtually impossible to get the hang of. 
Left and right turns the kart and 
pushing forward causes the kart to 
accelerate. However when you stop 
pushing forwards to turn around a 
corner, the kart stops almost 
immediately! This stopping and starting 
is also painful to the eardrums as the 
monotonous drone only sounds when 
you are moving. 



The various options mentioned earlier 
do actually have some effect on the 
control of your kart. The controls are so 
difficult to handle though that you don't 
notice that you accelerate faster with a 
larger sprocket ratio, but have a lower 
top speed. 

At first glance you may think that 
'Karting Grand Prix* is an attempt to 
copy the arcade game 'Super Sprint' 
(which incidentally has recently been 
released by Electric Dreams Software), 
however, once you have played it you 
will see that this game is absolutely 
nowhere near as playable or graphically 
and audibly as spectacular as Super 
Sprint. DO NOT be fooled by the 
screen shots on the back of the box if 
you see this in your local software store. 
Take a look at the game in action if you 
can. Games of such poor quality do the 
ST no justice whatsoever, but 
unfortunately there seem to be a great 
number being released. 



52 Pag* 6 - Issue 32 



ST GAMES ST GflflES ST GAMES 



* • ♦ * 



SCREAMING 

WINGS 

Red Rat Software 

£19.95 



Reviewed by 
John Davison Jnr 



Screaming Wings from Red Rat is 
another game to be converted across to 
the ST from the eight bit micro's. The 
pine is basically a vertically scrolling 
shoot 'cm up> loosely based on the 
arcade machine '1942', however the ST 
version has been brought up to date. 
Instead of old World War Two planes, 
you now fly in a '520ST Strike Fighter', 
which, in the instruction booklet, looks 
remarkably similar to an F16 strike 
fighter. 

The game Itjads with a fairly good 
picture of a jet fighter flying towards you 
with the Red Rat and the Screaming 
Wings logos behind it. Accompanying 
this picture is a digitised tune which 
although fairly good quality, is a little 
monotonous being just a bassy guitar 
sound repeating itself over and over. 

Once the game has loaded you are 
shoot as many enemy planes as possible, 



and to pick up various features (such as 
shields) for your plane along the way. 
Shields only last for a short lime, but 
enable you to fly anywhere without 
being shot out of the sky. A 'drone 1 
plane can also be activated which flics 
along with you and shoots whenever you 
do. This particular feature is very useful 




when there are a lot of enemy aircraft 
about, A bomb enables you to destroy 
all enemy fighters on the screen by 
hitting the space bar, and finally you can 
pick up a "rapid tire' icon. 

Upon completing a level you must 
first destroy the large enemy bomber by 
shooting it many times, before landing 
at the airfield. Having landed, another 
distorted voice says 'Good shooting' and 
greeted by a cheerful voice telling you 



that 'Red Rat software proudly 
presents...' followed by a distorted voice 
sounding like somebody yelling 
'Screaming Wings 1 with a mouth full of 
corn flakes, Pressing the lire button on 
the joystick causes the game logo to 
disappear and the computer screams 
something totally unrecogni sable, which 
no matter how many times I hear it I 
can't work out what it says! 

The graphics in 'Screaming Wings* 
are clear and colourful, as are the sprites 
which are reasonably well animated. 
The background shows the sea and the 
islands above which the action takes 
place and scrolls by extremely smoothly. 
It's nice to see one of the cheaper British 
titles with scrolling that doesn't make 
your eyes hurt. 

The aim of the game is merely to 
you are rewarded for the number of 
planes you have shot down. When you 
are finally killed the familiar 'Game 
Over' comes up on the screen, and a 
squeaky voice yells "Game over 
man,. . .game over! ".If your score was 
good enough, you can put your name in 
the high score table, but before doing 
this, the guy with the corn flake problem 
comes back and says something 
unintelligible again! 

Overall it's not a bad little game 
which is reasonably playable. 



FORMULA 1 
GRAND PRIX 

Micro value, Tynesoft 

£19.95 



Reviewed by 
Ron Stewart 



Digitised strains of Fleetwood Mac's 
The Chain' welcome you to 'Formula 1 
Grand Prix', a Pole Position clone with 
added frills. 

After the opening titles comes the 
menu. Options on the screen include the 
choice of track, car and number of laps. 
You can also, if you wish, elect to run a 
full season using all the tracks. There 
are six tracks available, from the French 
Paul Ricard circuit with its long, fast 
straights to the twisty Detroit street 
circuit. Each circuit has different 
background scenery, Silvers tone, 
though, only has very low cloud! 

You are given a choice of five cars. 
They all have different characteristics 
but are all supposed to be competitive. 
The Williams is fast, whilst the Lotus 



handles well but is slow. My favourite 
car for best all round performance is the 
Benetton. The selection screen shows 
the cars in colourful profile. Obviously 
you will need to choose your car with 
care if you are going after lap records, 
it's no use trying to get the fast Ferrari 
around the light Monaco streets, better 
here to choose the Lotus. Finally, you 



Lap I 1 Spe*<J: 
Reus- UttiU 



S4 



S L or r : #U (1 "j 



ti*ar I J 




can choose the number of laps you wish 
to race over, either one, three or five. 

Using the timed practice option you 
can test to see which car performs well 
on which circuit. If your timed practice 
lap is within two seconds of the lap 
record you will get pole position in any 
subsequent race on that course Racing 
is very similar to Pole Position. The car 



is moved about the track using the 
joystick. Pushing it forward accelerates 
the car, rearward decelerates. Pressing 
the fire button will move your car 
through its six (count 'em) gears. Most 
of the time you'll only be using fifth or 
sixth. Points are awarded for distance 
driven and the number of cars overtaken 
and deducted if you are overtaken. As 
well as the score, the engine revs, time 
and selected gear are shown at the top of 
the screen. If you are ncaring the rev 
limit of your car the rev counter will 
flash, too much will blow the engine. Do 
this too many time or hit too many other 
cars and you will be disqualified for 
dangerous driving. 

I have only one complaint and that is 
that the motion is shown by flashing the 
track. The strobing effect is quite 
wearing and after prolonged playing I 
usually ended up with a headache. I 
would have preferred some form of 
wheel movement. 

As li basic racing game Lhis one would 
be my choice over Pole Position. There 
are more complex simulations coming 
but Formula 1 Grand Prix is a game and 
not a simulation and as a game it comes 
out quite well. 



Page 6 - Issue 31 



SI 



A 



The leading North Wert 
ATARI Specialist ATARI Dealer 



V.L/ IHTS 



ADBROKE 
OMPUTING 

E tt H AT i Q H * i. 



'w \ ■■" " J i i n .. 



atifelp Ki*t.; 

It* iwaar aaaic 




A0 ANIMATOR 

BY AG SOFTWARE 

FOR THE. ATARI ST 

You'd like to write your ow n game in 

BASIC, but you can't handle the 

animated graphics? 

Now we have the answer 

AG ANIMATOR! 

Supports GFA 8ASIC and FAST 

BASIC. 
Animate up to 20 big frame (66 

pixels wide by 33 pixel* high). 
Fully icon controlled. 
Compatible with Degas AND 

Meochrome picture files. 
Full design facilities such as draw, 

fill, gird, copy, etc. 
Multi-screen layout. 
Colour selection from disk, or 

controllable from AB ANIMATOR, 
VCR style animation controls. 
Save? frames, colour palette and 

animation data in BASJC format. 
Includes BASIC routines and FREE 

demonstration programs, 

£12.99 



' 



&>** *t*y%»#*r* 



v**i 



LF ,r [U 



d-- 



SCORE S11W 



|btc|d|e|f|g|h|i|j|k|l|nl 



EEBBDSBBDDBSBhh 



SPELL WITH OSCAP 
BY AB SOFTWARE 

FOR THE ATARI ST 



E12.99 



Full colour screens, 

Sound and pictures. 

Age range 5-10, 

Simple to operate. 

Makes spelling fun. 

Multiple levels (selectable). 

Hi sco re table. 

Teaches keyboard skills. 

Improves motor co-ordination. 




■SO TAFV TO USE 

USES YSJUFtUWM PRINTER 

SE T IT UP I N &NLV h i/ 1 H UTES 

m i n te n ooot s t re. sue rut d i y sof twahf. 

MOUSE CONTROL LEU 

m 'ii i r - wi tm mumii r>n colour Momton 

RUNS IN HIGH OH IOW RESOLUTION 

ALL IMAGES CfttteF ALTFREDICOlOUnEDI AT ANY TIMS 

LIUHING SCANNING 8YU5INU THE GREY SCALE 

IMAGES CAM Of JAvFO AS DEGAS, HE O OH IW<J [TH] FILES 

VIRTUALLY TURNS VOUll ST INTOA FAS 

IMAGE UUAl>TY BETTER THAN MDSl SYSTEMS 

ATIOTIMESTHEPRICE £99 99 



QUICK-LIST PLUS 

AMD MASTERMAT 

BY AB SOFTWARE 

FOR THE ATARI ST 

Need that document file but can't 

find it? Lost an important program 

but can't remember which disk you 

put it on? 

QUICK-LIST PLUS is the answer. 

Available for 8 Bit. 
Works in colour or mono. 
Search for Disk, 
Sort on disk or name. 
Reads disks from any drive 

(including hard disk), 
Saves to data file. 
Add files manually. 
Rename files, 
BuiJt in help, 
Printer output. 
Fully icon driven s 
Easy to use. 




MASTERMA1 

Works in colour or mono, 
Works on A or B Drive. 
Customised formats, 
Copy protects your software. 
Multi-sector, multi-track format. 
Fast read format. 

£6.99 



m ■nfTH*ftl*« 

Hiitirnit.* 


EBQ 1 
HE1EI 

^^^^u H^^^^ ^^^^^m 


[rrcffmi J | rpir [ 



ADD 
WITH OSCAR 




avwicwn y=i wrrjuktti ism 

ADD WITH OSCAH 
BY AB SOFTWARE 

FOR THE ATARI ST 
Educational software written for the 
under ten's. Let your children use the 
computer for fun and learning. 

Full colour screens, 
, Sound and pictures 
Age range 5 • 1ft 

Simple to operate. 

Add, subtract, multiply and divide. 

Multiple levels {selectable). 

Fully mouse controlled. 
Hiscore table, 

£12,99 



PICSTRIP BY AB SOFTWARE 
FOR THE ATARI ST 
Are your GFA BASIC loading screens 
and Alert/information boxes drab and 
dreary? 
Then never fear PICSTRIP is be re I 

Supports GFA BASIC, FAST BASIC 

and ST BASIC, 
Give your programs in BASIC a 

truly professional look. 
Manipulate Picture files with ease. 
Degas, Neochrome and AB Animator 

compatible. 
Drop down menus. 
Work; in all resolutions. 
Grab all or part of a picture file, 
3 terenru — have 3 picture! In 

memorv and switch instantly! 
Works with any drive (including 

hard drives). 
Converts from Degas/Neo to BASIC 

screen or icon and vice versa. 
Instructions, BASIC routines and 

FREE demonstrations on disk. 

C6.99 



A 



The leading North West 
ATARI Specialist ATARI Dealer 




ADBROKE 
OMPUTING 

INTERNATIONA L 



33 Ormjklrk Road 
Pr««ton, L*nci. Pfll 3QP 
Til: (0772) 21474 {1 11(1*) 
(0772) 203166 (3 linos) 

Bul.'Board {0772) 27236 
6pm to 9am 



A 

ATARI 



This Company has given years of full support to ATARI users Countrywide from their retail shop premises at Ormskirk Road', 
Preston. Now from their MEW Mail Order Depot they can offer the same excellent service to all Mail Order Customers. 
AN Software and Hardware is fully tested prior to selling. This ensures that Customers receive working items so that returned 
goods, and all the attendant frustration are a thing of the past, Ail Hardware is supported by our own 'ON SITE' engineers, 
therefore quick turn round on all repairs is guaranteed 

All prices quoted are fully VAT inc. and there are no 'hidden extras', what you see is what you get. Prices include delivery. 
Phone for latest Prices/Releases. 



520STM Packages 



PHONE 




IMOSTF+Mouse 

+Softwr £480.00 

1Q40STF+ Mouse 

+HiRes Mon 

+Softwr £580.00 

KMOSTF+Mctuse 

♦Colour Mon 

♦Softwr £780,00 



1 Meg Upgrades are available for the 

520STM, These are our own design 

and are very simple to fit, 

Using the same board, all ST's can be 

Upgraded to 2mg or 4mg, So no need 

to sell your 520 just Upgrade to a 

Mega ST using our board. 

1 Meg Upgrade (STFM) £70.00 

1 Meg Upgrade (All ST'SS 

+ Board £150,00 

Upgrade Boards £120.00 

2.5Meg Upgrade+Board PHONE 

4Meg Upgrade+Board PHONE 

If any of the above Upgrades are 
purchased vvith Hardware then deduct 
£5.00 from total. 



All Hard Disks come with Utilities 
to cure the 40 Folder problem + 
Backup Utilities, Fast Read Write etc. 



PRINTERS 




Dot Matrix 




Star LC 10 


£210.00 


NUlOSheetfeeder 


£55.00 


National Panasonic 


PHONE 


MP 165 


PHONE 


MP135 


PHONE 


LX86 Tractor Feed 


£19.00 


LX86 Sheetfeeder 


£55.00 


LQ800 24pinD/M 


PHONE 



ALL OTHERS PHONE 




Per Disk 

10 Disks 

10 Disks+Plasticlib case 
100 Disks+Cases 
500 Disks+Cases 



y/i D/S 

D/D 

CI. 99 

£16.00 

£17.50 
£150.00 
C650.00 



SH D/S 

D/D 46TPI 

£0,80 

EG. 50 

£7.50 

£60,00 

£280.00 



All Disks are covered by 

unconditional lifetime guarantee. 



an 



ED 

Ho 



We also stock a full range of quality 
P/D ST Software at £3.99 per Disk 
Send S.A.E, for catalogue. 




Our ATARI trained engineers will 
repair all Hardware in minimum 
time at competitive rates. Please ring 
for a quotation. All repairs carry a 

90 day warranty, 



All Printers, Disk Drives etc, supplied. 
with cables, etc. NO HIDDEN 

EXTRAS, 



Mega ST's 
Lazer Printers 
PC Clones 



PHONE 
PHONE 
PHONE 



DUST COVERS 



Computers 
Monitors 
Disk Drives 
Printers 



£3.99 
£4.99 
£2.99 
£7.39 



IF IT'S AVAILABLE we have it! 
Send S.A.E. for full catalogue. 



AN dedicated books and mags in stock. 




52QSTFM+Mouse 

+Softwr £285.00 

520STFM+Mouse 

♦Softwr 

+1 Meg Upgrade £350.00 

520STFM Mega Pack 
520STFM + Mouse 
+Softwr 

+ 1 Meg Upgrade 
+ 1 Meg 2nd Drive_£485.QQ 
Equal to l040STF+y,Wleg Drive 
+ Modulator 

For Med Res Col Mon add.. .. £299.00 
For High Res Mono Mon add_£l 29,00 

All Hardware is covered for 12 months 
by our service dept, and is tested 

prior to delivery to assure satisfaction, 

^ ■T"^f \ Bfifflr 

We have a complete range of Software 
in stock and fully tested. 

PERIPHERALS 

Triangle 1 mg D/Drive £139.00 

Triangle 2x1mg D/Drive £229.00 

Pro Draw Graphics Tab_. £299,00 

Cumana 1 Meg D/Drive £139.00 

All Drives come complete with 
Software. 

HARD DRIVES 

Atari 20mg £550.00 

Triangle 20mg Hard Disk £575.00 

Supra 20mg £550.00 

30Mey (Cumana) £699.00 

40 Meg (Triangle} £799.00 



Any Software 


problems? Queries7 


Give us a ring. 


we usually have the 


answer. 





We also stock s full range of ATARI 
S Bit Hardware and Software including 
the new XE range. Please ring for 
prices. 



TO ORDER simply send, or phone your order, stating Full Name, Address, 
Visa or Access No, r s, Cheque or Money Order, Make payable to 
Ladhroke Computing International, 
33 0rmskirk Road, Preston, Lanes. FR1 2QP, 



FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL ON THE 
ABOVE NUMBERS OR SEND S.A.E. 

AND STATE FULL REQUrREMENTS. 




Les Ellingham checks the cost 

of keeping two monitors hooked up 



When the ST firsi appeared^ most users boughi a mono 
monitor and used an existing colour monitor or also bought one 
of the Atari colour monitors.. Other users went the other way 
purchasing a mono monitor later but whatever the combination 
there was one great bugbear which was that you had to 
continually unplug and plug in each monitor as required. As 
well as being quite tedious it hardly did the monitor socket on 
the ST any good. 

This situation continued for an unbelievably long time with 
only a couple of 'home made' switching devices available at high 
cost } but now there are several monitor switches readily 
available to enable you to leave both monitors hooked up and 
change between the two at the flick of a switch or push of a 
button. We have had two of these on test for a couple of 
months. 

THE LOW COST SWITCH 

The first is made by Lindy Computer and is available from 
Frontier Software at a cosl of £19,95. It consists of a small 
black box 3" by 2" and 1" high which can be fairly 
unobtrusively tucked away behind your ST. In fact this is 
probably the only place for it as the cable supplied is only 8" 
long! The cables from your mono and colour monitors plug into 
the opposite side of the box to the fixed cable and a small switch 
mounted on top allows you to switch between monitors. Note 
that, as with other switches or when unplugging the monitor 
cable, the ST will reboot when monitors are switched - 

THE POSH ALTERNATIVE 

If you are willing to pay out a bit more for the luxury of a 
monitor switch then you might like to try the Monitor Master 
available from Shacksoft for £35.00. This is altogether a much 
more sophisticated unit although it dues exactly the same job as 
the Lindy switchbox. The box is in matching ST grey and 
measures 4|" by 3" and is 1 J" high. It is designed to sit either 
beside your ST or alongside the monitor and has a fairly 
generous and quite substantial cable over 2 feet long! It is also 
mounted on four rubber feet to protect your furniture. All 
cables are connected at the back of the unit and switching is 
achieved by a push button on the front. When pushed in the 
colour monitor is engaged and when pushed again the mono 
monitor is used. The ST will reboot as stated earlier. 

A COMMON PROBLEM 

Both switches work well but strangely both have the same 
'bug* which means that you cannot leave your colour monitor 
switched on at the same time as the mono monitor. Well, you 
can, but both switches continue to feed a signal to the colour 
monitor when the mono is engaged resulting in a most annoying 





The Lindy switch from Frontier Software 




The more expensive Monitor Master 

buzzing being emitted from the speaker of the colour monitor. I 
cannoL understand why all lines could not be switched. Both 
units probably use the same switch inside and the manufacturer 
seems to have taken the cheap and easy way out„ as is all too 
common nowadays. 

WHICH ONE? 

They both work, well and either can be recommended 
provided thai you don't mind switching off the colour monitor 
whilst using the mono. I personally prefer the Monitor Master 

because it is more flexible due to the longer cable and more 
stylish overall, but you mav not consider that worth an extra 

These units can probably be obtained from your local dealer. If 
not frontier Software can be contacted at P.O. Box 113, 
Harrogate, N. Yorks, HG2 QBE. TeL 0423 67140 and Shacksoft 
are at Unit 9> Ascot Court, White Horse Business Park 
Trowbridge, Wilts. Tel. 02214 3502 • 



S6 Pa** ft - Issue 32 



SOFTWARE 
EXPRESS 



EUROPE'S LARGEST 

ATARI MALL ORDER 

COMPANY 

(021) 328 3585 



ATARI 






UNISON EPROM PROGRAMMER 



T.J.P. ELECTRONICS LTD are releasing 
their latest product to enhance the ATARI ST 



* Fully cased unit 

* For 520/1040 and Mega ST's 

* GEM interface and command line mode 

* 2764, 27128, 27256 and 27512 EPROM'S 

* 16 bit and 8 bit formats 

* Full editing facilities 

* Search in ASCII and HEX 
Load and Save to RAM and Disk 
Partial and Full programming 
Works with OS9 and RTL2 Real Time 
development systems 



NEW PRODUCT 




(Microwares OS9 & RTCS RTL2) TM 

DISTRIBUTED BY SOFTWARE EXPRESS 

DEALER ENQUIRIES INVITED 

021 328 3585 



£ 286.35 inc.VAT 
(For cartridge boards please phone) 

PRODUCED BY T, J.P. ELECTRONICS LTD. 

3,Wesl Street, Scarborough, North Yorks YO 11 2QL 
PHONE 0723 378837 



PACE Linnet MODEM +■ Software 

Includes Interface Cable, FASTCOM Communications Software 
AND FREE Subscription to Microtink 



* V21 (300/300 Baud) Operation 

* V23 (1200/75 - 75/1200 Operation) 

* Hayes Compatible 

* Autodial/Autoanswer/Red tat 

* Baud Rate Scanning QnftiA/ara 

* Built in Number Store _ ^ Uliwa '^ 

* Battery Backup Express Price 

* Speed Buffering OH 7Q OKI 

* BABT Approved £ # / &*&U1 



Value for money 
Modem 163.30 
Cable 19.95 

Fastcom 49.95 

Total 233.20 

SAVE OVER 

£53! 



FOR ALL YOUR ATARI NEEDS 

HARDWARE, SOFTWARE, PRINTERS, 

BOOKS, SERVICE, REPAIRS, DISKS Etc. 

AND, OF COURSE, LASER PRINTING 

PLEASE VISIT OUR STORES 
OR PHONE 
(021) 328 3585 



PLEASE SEND ME YOUR LATEST PRICE LIST 

NAME „ , , , 

ADDRESS .„, 



I OWN A 520 I 1040 / 2MEC / 4MEG 



SOFTWARE EXPRESS 

ATARI CENTRE 

514/516 ALUM ROCK RD. 

BIRMINGHAM B8 3HX 
PHONE (021) 328 3585 



SOFTWARE EXPRESS 
MAIL ORDER 

(021) 328 3585 



SOFTWARE EXPRESS 

ATARI CENTRE 

212/213 BROAD STREET 

BIRMINGHAM BIS 

PHONE (021) 643 9100 



DEALER AND OVERSEAS ENQUIRIES INVITED 



Vaftt: 6 - Issue 32 S7 




Les Howarth brings you two 
classic card games with classic 
Atari graphics 

xhe deck ■**£ ddes *fco V^f foUoWe d bv a *J 

c , r d *h«h *£ svhic h <*&** * * S ^ ne%t tSit there «* 



Bids* you wk ^ ieeri of Sp***" P^L CH** 1 ° 7S top «** s 

plavetsh^d- 



AE 
or 


i a 


REM 


* 


HHI5T « 


EN 


13 


■ EH 


H 


by * 


AK 

no 


13 
14 


REM 
REM 


• 


LE5 HOHfiHTH " 






VT 


IS 


REM 


■ 


PAGE e MAfaAZXHE - EHGLAMD * 










en 


17 


GEM 







tlY SB HM PMS {688! ,B1$<46) ,BL$140) ,PI?l>f EJS 

4> 
IM 188 GQSUB 27580;G0SUB 27QBO : Cfrilll HOB 

B:GOTQ 1B« 
C« 118 FOR T = H» TO N4 I FOfl I=HO TD KlJ:Hi« 

Bl(T.Jl7MO'H(lHO?CT,IlTBa:MIET J I)=MI:NI 

HT I !*JFMT T 
■I 120 FOB I=H1 TD HEI rPACKCI} -1 ; MtKT 1 
31 1ID FOR 1-H1 TD MSlift-IHT CHSlftRHD CH01 + 

HI) :T = PACK(I) I PACK (I) = PACK <B» :PACKCR> 

TsHEXT 1 1 RETURN 
X* 1B# POKE 532,58. II" :POSITIDH 17, Ml I? UN 

£ r M_J« 

GU 280 IF B»r71 THEM &8T0 650G 

HL ZOS IF dt> = 5J THEH GOSllB 6460 

RF 287 IF CD>H52 THEN 22G 

Zfi 218 POSITION 17, H2:? 1MB J 53-&P J J IF C0> 

43 THtH * IWt;"/" 

zr 112 CARD -PACK ELO) 

MJ 228 G05U43 78«J8 = T1 = T : C 1 iMPP : O- 7B : Bl tH? 

:1F LmS-'-h" THEH GQSLIB /him 

HO 214 CAHD = PACK<;CDtHl] :GO*>UB 7«B«:T3 1:C 

VCJ 2?6 IF C«S-"M" TME» 1 be 

PE 230 IF FLAG TMFM G05UB IfiOM : &0-=illH 1KB 

: LOMJD OHOBLOIO ZIB 

HE 2SA &06U& BJ«U:GUiUB 3080:GO6Ue 60fl0;& 

0T8 288 
MC 26e IF FLAG THEH GO SUB 996: 60 SUB 8780; 

GOSUB 6696: GOTO 288 

xo see cosub a?«o:GosuB 490:gosub eooeico 

i u io* 

IV 4 DO J H*6 :DI HO :D7 HO: r OH I-Hl ID HlltC 
1 -IH1IID2 (I If j 13 ;ir U-HB THEN 4iO 

KU 4B5 IF J-HO THEN B? CI 

IV 410 J = Hlrir GDCHRB1 ItltM BI=A2;1 = H13 

LJF 4be MtKi 1:11 JOH8 THEH gou 

OH 488 GOSUB 2888: IF CD>HS2 THEH C1=CAHD1 
;G«TO 4 79 

HI 4*4 IT Tl^TRUHP AND LlfOtBUNP llttH 70B 

II H J7A TF OUT THFH 7 DO 

HK 4/-j IF CIX33. THEH CHK ( TRUMP) =H0 

Mil 4BU GL1'>UB ■ J 00-<.U I U '..14 

HC SBO Fl = HO:FZ=HO:Gl = HO:G2 = Njl3 

Ml :.«2 FOR I = M1 TD HA 1 F =CHK 411 : 1 F T - KB Tli 
I N S 1 1 

vn r.H4 rr r>ci mr« n i:i>i-t :1,0m 'jii 

nil 'itifi II I l.i THEH P IMI tNJ«B«[.(Mfl)l : II 
R=H1 THEH F1=I 

AK 5B7 TF F<C2 THEH F 1=1 [ EZ SP :CD1D 312 

TJ 58B IF F=G? THEH R-IHT (Ni«PNB CHfll J : TF 

I.- N I THEH FZ = I 
UD 111 HEKT i:ir rz-HD Hit H H-Pl 
ZH 513 SEIUOH 
Ui S14 M-NUilUH I=H1 TO H13:G2=HAHD2 tfljl 

>lir G2<>Ha THEH H=G2:I=H13 



58 



Pajft ft - U<m v 31 




El 5 26 HEX I 1 1 If BD>HS3 THEM 786 

**t 516 II- GZ<Mll THm F1=FZ|C6T6 550 

Dl 535 FOR I -HI TO HI 3 :G7-HAHT>2 (F 1, I) 1 IF 

G2<>H8 THEH I-H1J 
CD 548 HCX1 I 
HI 5.58 GOTO 12*0 
Tr. 7fl8 F=*6!FUR 1 HI TO M13:IF HAH02CTRUH 

P,It=Mu THIN NBMT T : GO TO 7 88 
NO 710 [12 HAHFJ.7 CTRLLHP .1? :I = N13:MEXT I i IF 

toiMb; ihih p-r.?;G0T0 79 
TH 7ZB r = C3-Ct:rF FiB5 (F) <HS OR (uBt.[r)<Mll 
BUD lliNlBI OB 5GH(F> = -H1 THE* 778 

TO 710 IF CI>>M:, J THEN 77(1 

no 766 9DT0 478 

IK 778 Fl-TRUMPlGoTO 1ZBU 

Pb 7BO IF »>HI THEN SIB 

TC ^03 GOTO 4 7 5 

SR 718 IF tHK IFHUHPl J M2 1IIFH 770 

UT 793 Al HUiltPK I = H1 ¥0 H I J : A l n 1 ♦ [ H uk[i 1 

I F HUMP , I J ONO} 

vn 7*4 HFHT I; IF 01-ttO Oft ChK. C 1 RUMP) > A 1 f 

HE* Ci-B : GO 111 .'/D 

EZ 7»ft ir HO MB THEN GZ-H 

SG ?t/ GOTO 7 78 

BJ BBD GJ-BHilF Ct><5J THEN BlO 

FV 610 XF Tl-TBUW AHC ODCANtl AND [MB) 

(83-C1J <Hfc OR ABS EB3-CARftl) <N4 OR Tl>» 

11 THEN 8.40 
GC B12 IF 63 = H0 THEM ti-BZ 
fit 414 GOTO ft JO 
CL FJZD If E3-H0 THFM q?=BZ:G0T0 648 

TG 838 IF CDCS3 IHtW IF (C1<N7 AMP CB3-C1 
>N7 Off 83<CnfiDlJ) AND 02OMB TIIFH G?-R 

5Z 948 F1=LVpG610 izoo 

IN 968 lu-jUB 7 inn 

UP IBS G05UB S68&I &1 = HBI 02-HB i L MO: H HO:l. 

05U8 2468 
CI fie IF CONST. THEN 14U0 
pro 91* if Tl-THIIMP OR Cl>9 THEH LB50 
JC J2B G1=H1: J-N13I Jl-H)8: ,I?tN» r BJ = H8 I F8fl 

1=111 TO M1IF CHHT[I1=M« OR T = THUMP THE 

H 468 
IL MQ IF CMKtIXJ THEH J 1-1 ; J-CHK II J 
Ha tso if CHKCI)>B3 THEH JZ=I P B3-CHK (i J 
CL 968 NtKI I 
HV 965 FOH J: -Mi 3 TO 11 5IEP -N I. : Q2 = HAHD2 ( 

J1,II:IF G7-H8 THEH 988 
tt «7 IF 4BS<G2-ClJ (HI THEH I = 1 1 : N.EH I It 

r i .it : r.1 N7 : r. n r 1 1 12#8 
Tf. 978 IF ChklJii Chi hub ubicsz-cd >H3 TH 

EH G2=H8:I -lizHEXT T:CHT0 1158 
I.P ?6D NEXT I 

*C 110 Gl=H3:F=H*:B.2 = HttIB3 = H13 [FUJI 
VK ttt FUR J=H1 TO M-IirOfl L-Hl TO Mil I U= 

H8WHU1,L) :IF G? = M0 THE" 18Z8 
CL 1688 IF AB^IGZ CiKjutiJ THEN L=H13:HEX 

T L :Gl = 16:G-DTO 170B 
hi' 1828 HEXT LlHEXT J 
JF LB38 ClTieiFOH J=m TO H2:F0n 1=111 la 

H13:rjZ = H0.HD2 fJ2,IJ i IF G2 = HB THEH 1B4B 
HK 113! TF ABSCC1-G2? < J«*Z THEH Fl-J2;I=M 

IIP J=KZ:HEXT IlMEMT JiGOTO 1ZOB 
«T 1MB H.EXT IlHEHT J:GO"TO 1LSB 
o* 16io ir cci(nii ahd tiOtruhjP) on (Tl = 

1HUMP BBD CKMl THEH 1863 
HH 1631 BDJUl 12?0;IF F20M THEH 1268 
HE 16SI Gl=lS:B2-#ie:B3=*8;F0R J=H13 T6 Iz 
■STEP "Ml;rOR T = M1 TO H4 : G? -'HANPT C T , J) 

I If G7 = H8 THEH 1856 
DH 10%4 IF A0S(C1-G2J <M2 THEH HI- 1 : H2 -G.2- ; 

IiQ-jUB 13BO 
EH 1853 ir CC1>M1I AHD G2=H13> THEH H-l ; 

F2 = hl 
No 1856 NEXT T:MrNT J:IF FZOH0 THEH G2=f 

Z:E;OT0 1784 
BX 1637 IF RI-Hfl THEH 1863 

lf i»ee ci=i»: J-H8= Ji-*ii:r dp j-mi T6 H4; 

F=CHKCl):ir r md thfh iq-62 
tf 1661 Ir r<ji thfh ji=f:J=I 

m|i 186Z MEKT I ■.C1-HAM9I (J, JU 1F1 = J:C6T6 ± 

768 
IK 11163 £1 = N5;FCR T-Hl TO HI i P OB I M1Z TO 
H16 STEP -HI :G7TttaHP?rT,I) i IF G2-HO I 

HtH IB^it 
OK 1485 IF II IFJIIHI 1 SMC nil'- t II E.Z)>ttfl THE 

■ G2=H8:GOTB 107S 
T.PJ 14 74 IF TIOIRUPIP AMP (Kit ClMD G2>11 
THEH G2-MU:GOTO 1875 



D,s ^s BKSl **"'»<> n IN 



^ - ££"•*** ^ut: aQt ^ ^u hwiIi 



C4ss ^c SeKs . 



* C «A VP pk Jtft l ^e TO _ . ,. 



WC 1072 Gl = Hfi I I-«ltJ If 1-1 I r-N4 

IB I (J ,'-, HEM I I: HE HI T:IP LlOlI THFH GI~K 

7IGOTO liflO 
NIP lOBI ron THIJ TO H6 5TEP -HI :G2 = HAHt>2 

(THUMP, TT ;IF G2=H0 THEN 1106 
ZK LV9& Fl = TnilHP:IF ahi (G7 c 1 ) <N i THEH I- 

ne 

JV HOB «EHT I i 11- G20HD IHIH Ll-VtBTD 1 

EH 
HK 115B FOB J = itl TO H2;F0R I=*ti TO H13:C7 

-HAH02CT1, II : IF T.7-H0 THEN 1157 
JG 1155. IF HBS(t7-Cl)-J THEH I=H13lJ = H3lF 

l-Tl:HFMT TlHENT J ! GOTO 1200 
HH 113/ HEMT I:HEKT J 
Oil 11 L.I* Gl-11 : F-HfllFOH J" Ml TO pHttfOtt IN 

1 TO H4:rOR H-Hl TO HIS! IF M=J| THFH I 

111 
OP1 ll't G2-HAHD7 ET , H3 : TF G7-H4 THFH !1?B 

ir ll/i ir »BMC? •[ II (B?«J THE* «F=H1J!F1 = 

T [T=M4: J=M5:F=W0=GOTO 11?8 , 

UF 117ft F=S1 

"5 11»0 HFHT NiHFHT T = HEXT J:IF FOH* THE 

H G 2 = F 

AH 1290 IF Hd*D2 (H F GZJ -M« THEN 1213 

PP 1718 BEST=G7;B=Z?;Bl=He:CnRP=G2 ;HAHD£ ( 

Fl -Gil -HB ■ T-Fl IC6SUB 7iee : PCTURM 
OL 1113. FOB I-Hl TD M4 : I P HrtHD 7 t T .. (.7 ] H(1 

THEH 171B 
Kt lZlb F l-.I : I -H4 ;HEHT ] : i. I) 1 <N IZlfl 
GK 1216 HEHT IlSTOP 

OL 1224 F2=H4lF6D T-Hl TO H4IC0H 1-M1J ID 
HI STEP -HI :62=HItT, I) :IF G2=H0 THEH 

US! 
FI 1238 GZ = HBHD2CT,I) I IF G2 O H8 THEH F1=T 

;I=Hl:T=H4 IF2=G2:GDT0 12S8 
VH 1240 I=H1 

TV 1Z58 HEMT IlHEKT T:RETURH 
1H 1300 F-B7:FOR T = H1 TO H4 : nHIt (I) =H6 : HE X 

T I 

PI T 1 J 1 B IP H AH D 2 ( B 3 , f I O H D IHEH CPtK(BI]=F 

;F=F-«1^G0T0 1316 
AL 1320 RETI1RH 
BV HUB r.O'illH 127B:TF FJONB THEH i2=FEIC 

DTD 1288 



IH 1485 IF «=«8 THEH 14«6 

l>V 1414 IF K=TRUHP HMD C HH C PL ) CH3 ttttfr »<7 
1 THEH I'.hiy 

BH 14ZO FOR I-Ml TD H 1 3 I C>Z-HAHP2 CK , II I IF 
GZ-H8 THEH 1411) 

nr 1423 ri-K;I-HU 

RG 143* HEKT I:IF C2 <> H8 THEH 1?0B 

KB 1468 J=H0 I J1=H0 I J2=H0:F2=H13 i FOR I=H1 

TO »4 = F = CHmi) ;IF FzM4 THFH 14B.O 
CO 1470 IF F)J THEH JX=IU=P 

lh iih ir r<n mlM f-z-F i J2 = I :IF J2=J1 T 

H I N F 2 - H I | 
FU 1488 HEHT T 

TH 1500 FOR I=H13 TO HI 5TEP -HI 
EX 1S14J G2 = HAH02CJ1,, I] : IF C2 = H6 THEH 154« 
mb 1524 l=Hi:ri=Jl 

OL 1548 HEHT 1 1 IP M <> H8 THEH I JOB 

UO 1S76 FOR I=H13 ¥8 Hi STEP -■! I G2=HHHDZ 

CTRUrtP, II IIP «,2 = H6 THEH 1598 
AA 1566 F1 = TRUHP I I=H1 
SB 1590 HEHT I:IF C7 <> H« THFH I2IB 

OM lfiOB •iTfpP 

HP 2BUB FOR I-Ml 10 H4 I CHK C I I =H9 : HEXT T 
«J 181(3 run T = H1 TO H4:FUR I=H1 TO Ml 3 

FH 2028 IF HAHE>7C T . II MO THEN ZOSD 
If 2830 CHKCTI-CHKCTltfJl 
TV 20 -jB MEKT I; HE XT IHIIUHH 
JC 2100 POKE 6B,Z6:POKF Bl.lIBiPO'iIIIOB H 

il.Hn:^ ttMfi;'> hv lead ":PO«(E 64,He>:P0 

5ITI0H H1,H*I' HHtJ"- 
JX 2116 COSIlB eOOOlRETLIRMi 
OLP 30D8 JZH6:B3=H8:B2=H8:F1 = LV :C1=H8 
GV 3810 F8R I=«l TO Hi J I C? = HAHD2 CL V , I > : I r 

GZ-HO FPItH 30bO 
HH 3076 J-BMlir G2<CARP1 THEH B3;E2 
OE 3838 IF LV = H4 AHD G2 = H11 THEH Cl-tlT I CO 

TO IDSD 
FBI IB40 BJC? 

HJ JOM1 HLKI 11 IE J-Ml THEH .1MIH 
HU 1100 G7 HBHDZ [H,H11) I If G2OH0 THE* I 

i H4 : r.nin 1200 



Page (V - iflsuc 32 



SO 



OL 
JV 

17 

N« 

OE 

UI 

•CO 

KK 



CD 
zz 



PO 

UN 

HU 

DG 
IK 
OF 

r .1 

DC 

vv 

FD 
00 

1 A 

■SJ 
L¥ 



GH 



IJ 

HO 

r h 



TK 
TF 



3118 Fi=Hl lOJ-MSil DR I Ml J TO HI '.III' 

-HI :G2=HAH02(hi , u -, ir [>i-hb in m use 
312* 03-G2: l-m 

1150 HFHT HEP BlOM* IHLH 141)11 

nzo r.D<iLkR ?oe«:G05lie sen; J1 = FH J-nb 

118* Oz-hu: T-Hbiir C9)Mr83 then go^ub 4 

900 ; LIIPU J4/IS 

3165 FOR I=N7+T TO T 5TEP -HI i G2=HAH02 

(F2,U:IF Gz-Ho 1 hi H 17BO 

31*11 r l=r2 ; I =m :0Z=GZ 

"«» HEKT I = TF 9.2 <>M0 THEM 12fl0 

T.JIO B:T-HO:FO.H I=H7tT TO T 5TEP -Ml : El 

iHUNDi f Jl ,1) : IF 1,'. Nil INEN 123b 

IITB Fl-Jl H=M1 :BS=G2 

m( HEHT I 

IZ4D FDR I-B2 TO H4:IF I -.11 OH I"F2 TH 

LH J25B 

3245 J2 = I 
3f5H HFHT I 

I 7 BO Gl-HO:rnP I"M7tI TD T 1TFP -Ml I SI 
IIDHDI ( J?, Tl : IT G?~HO THFH 3390 

ni« I - ■ 1 1 & l - G3 

3300 HEKT I 

3320 IF «3)G1 THEN F 1 = Jl : &2 = 03 I GOTO 12 

0* 

illU IT G1>B3 THEN F 1-11 I L?-C| I tgid II 

H 

1350 ir T-Nb THEN T=H1:40T0 1105 

3364 IF B1=GL THEN I -INI ( ZBRHD [RBI i N 1 ] 

IIP T=M1 THEN F1=J1:G2=*3;G0T0 1200 

31741 F1^JJ^C7-H:CBT0 12*8 

3400 IF HItM4 J Hlll-N* THEH I4CD 

1410 ("Z -NO: TDK L-H1I TD Ml. Z 5TIP -Ml : E 

2=HftH02(N4,L) ! IF G2=H0 THEN 3450 

7420 FZ=H1;L=H11:F1=H4 

345* Mrm LlIP FIONO AH& (CHK(H4> <H21 

THEM 12MB 
1460 G7=B3:F1=N1:GOTO 1180 
14/8 & M7 :G1 H0 : .J HP: FdH T = H2 TO H4 : IF 

ItllliHB OR CHKII) HO THEM ■'. * ? 7 
147? FOP I-»1I TO HI STEP -Ml ; GZ=HAHP2 
(T.DtIF (.7 Hll THEN 3475 

1473 IF G2>J THEN J ;£2 I Gl ~T : IF CHKH): 
Ml THEM T-H4SI-M1J 
3475 MEKT I 

1477 HFHT T ! IF ClOMO THEM MZ-Jiri-SlI 
GOTO J7«B 

14JSO A-H4irDH T = H2 TO H4:IF C!HMT)-N8 
THEM 1*1 a 

1402 rOH I-H1I TO HI 5TCP H1:GZ-HBHDZ 
(T.U:TF 1.3 • HO THFH 34B7 
1405 r 1 - T : T "HA : I = H I 
3467 HEKT I 
3499 HEHT Tl&OTO 120* 

35*0 F1=*-V:IF LVOHL AMO LVOH4 THEN 3 
560 
3505 IF LV=N4 THEN 354* 

3010 IT BIOHO TMTH C2-BI:CDTD 17 bo 
IE2B LOIO IMiO 

3540 IF CAR01=11 AMO BIONB THEN G2=*3 

I GOTO 1204 

15 50 IF B7OH0 THEH [; UlIOTII I ZOO 

3560 IF B3OM0 THEH G7=B3:G0T0 1209 

3 5 55 TF 11()H> THFH C2-BZ:CDTB 17 BO 

3579 G2-Gl:G0T0 1700 

3600 A=N*:£05U0 2188IG0SUB ZO88:GO5U0 

■jOO: Jl-Fl 

36*7 IF C0>HS2 THEH 500B 

3 000 IF IZOH DH K-H4 THEH I BSD 

lb IB IF HI(M4,H11)=M0 THEM 16*0 

1620 J-HOlFOR I=M13 TO Nil 4TEP -Ml I Ca 

-fldHB? fH4,T> [IF G7 HO THFH 3540 

1630 J=T:I-Hll 

1MB HEHT Is IF HHHPZI04, Hlll^ll THEH J 

-Hfl : A-N7:GOIU J/iB 

3641 ft-»2SIF CHKCN4KM3 AMD J <> MO THEM 

J=H« :G1=H0: A = H7 IGOTO 3750 
3542 FOP I=H1 TO H10;G7-riaMP2CH4, IJ : IF 

G2=MB THEH 1645 
3641 F1-H4:I-H10 

I&4TS HFXT IlTF [?<)•■ THEH 17HO 
365B IF F20H1 THEN 3770 

3 6BO TF CHKIHl! HI ElHD CHKCH3)-*0 AMD 

CHK4H41 HB IHtH 34 BO 

1670 G2-HBI&O5U0 4540:IF G2OM0 THEM J 

-M;Cl=fl; GOTO I75B 

3676 GOTO 1720 

34>OM FOM I=H1 TO HI I : GZ HBND2 [HI . Tl I IF 

LI-HB THEH 371B 
I*?* F1=H1; r-Mll 



K II 1710 HFHT T : t. a T O 17BO 

*2 3/70 N1U:H NO:B7 HU:ni HUM M« ; I I tl* 

KIIZI-H1 AND tOFZ IHLH 4BIIU 
Itn 3775 J-M6:G1=HB:IF K=F2 THFH J?50 
TK 3778 FOfl I=M1I TO HI *TEP -HI : G2 -H AHb I 

irZ t X>lir &2-H« THEH 3740 
ru 3730 J-liClrFIl I=H1 
FP 1 7411 HFXT T 
AC 3750 B2=H0;Fl-N0; IF J1=N1 THEH G05UB 4 

SBOilF G2OH0 IHt.H B2 = GI I f I -HI ! bll ID 17 

SO 
MO 1751 IF J1=H1 THEH J=H0:GDTD 1/BU 
MH 3752 IF K-Jl IHCH I/OB 
HH 3753 A=H0:IF J1=H4 THEH G05UB 410*:ft-H 

I I :4;nT0 378» 
FH 17^5 FOP T=H13 TO HI <3 T£ P -MM. I G2=HAHD2 

[.if, i}: if r.r-nn thfh 377B 
VF 3766 B7-I:F1-J1:I=H1 
GA 3/,'U Htm 1 
HH 3760 ».< • HO ifll-HO ;* UK 1-HZ IO H4 ; IP I J 

1 OR I=F2 THEH 3785 
KK 3702 IF B3=H0 THEN B3=I:G0T0 3705 
HK 3784 A1=I:I=M4 
GH 1705 NEXT I 
Zt> I7B6 IF JlOHl AND F20M1 HUD CHKCB31- 

H* AMD CHKCHDOHO THEH BI=HliG05UB 42 

00:JZ=Nl:Hi=G2:e3=<G2<>Haj : GO-TO 399-0 
HM 370B TF CNH(B3?=H«' THEH BJ = A1 
MR 3790 H=H0: J2=M0:IF k-SJ THEH 390b 
I* 3797 IF Bl^Hl THEH G05UB 4Z0#:IF G2t>H 

D THFH H-C7: J2=H1 :C0T0 J90B 
TL 1713 IF BI-H4 THFH GOSUB 4 100; IF GZOM 

n THEH M=G7 ; J2=H4i&0T0 3?0« 
II 1734 FOR T-HI3 TO HI 1TFP -Ml ! G 7= HANOI 

Clll.ll :IF &2-HB THFH 30 00 
ID WVi IMtl JI=H3[I-M1 
VH I8B0 HEMT I I IF IMS 1(1 HDD J7-H4) AND [C 

HI CH4,M11] OMB AHP HAHD7 EM4 , Hll ) =«B) D 

H (H&HD7IH4 ,H11 1 =H11 AHt> CHKCH4U =N2)J 

THFH M 
PS IBIO RFH H:H0; J3=N0; IF K=A1 THEM 3900 

JL llOB IF J-HB MD H?MB AND MHO THFH I 

6 Bil 

(10 3950 GOTO 4300 

KA 4000 Sl = 26 1 J=M0 : F«B I = HI3 TO HI 4IEF> - 

Mi :G7-H41H02CF2,I) : IP G7=M0 THEH 4030 

RP 407B F1=F2:I=H1 

Kfl 401H HtXI llUDID 17O0 

IV 41 DO TF HT (H4 , HI I 1 -HE) THFH PFT1JRH 

UV 4MB TDR I Nil TO HI MM 1 HI :l.7 HAHO/ 

(HIIl:rF [,1 HI THFH 4130 

BH 4170 F1=H4;B2=I:I-H1 

GL 4130 HEKT IlOETllAH 

GO 420B FOR I=M1 TO MS : G2=HAH02 (HI, I) : IF 

dl -Hfl THEH 4Z40 
HP 4Z30 I-MG 
i,0 424B HFHT T:PETIIPH 

00 4300 FOB I=M1 ro «4 ; 11 < IJ -MB i HCxT I 
ZH 4110 MlHD^Gl I 1^(HZ] =F1;1*[H11 =:JZili[ 

H4> =G1 
%0 4317 IF J=H« THEN S% CM1J =H8 ; H CH4> =HB 
IB 4314 IF R7TH0 THEN 5^(N2I=M8 
DH 4I1B. TF MzHO THEH 55fH3»=H0 
IE 4120 H-IHT(H4«HHMHai>HI) ! IF <i^lMT=H0 

I III M 4 320 
LT 4374 IF R=H4 THEN R=H1 
KN 433B FiaClfEttltr fl-Hl THEH G2 = JlG0T0 1 

7B0 
HZ 434« IF R=N2 THEN G2-BII&0T0 120B 
HU 4.TSH Sl^HlCOTD 1209 
UH 43B0 J=H13:0Z=N0:FDR T=HJ TO HI 5TEP - 

HltFOR I-Hl TO HlllIF CHKCTI-HO THFH T 

=H1I:GDTU 4430 
LU 4390 G2=HAH02f T,IJ :IF G2=H8 1MEM 441B 
RO 4400 IP t2<J THEM J-GZ:B2±T 
KH 4430 HEKT IlHEHT T i 62- J : F 1-02 : GOTO 1Z0 


0'> 4500 FOR T=H1 TD N6IG2-HTCN1 -IT ! IF GZ = 

HO THEH 454* 
LH 4528 G2=HAH02(\Hl > lk : IF u H« THFH 4540 
HH 4530 T-M6 

JO 4540 HEKT I I IP 62 <> MO THEM F1=H1 
BB 4550 hETiihh 
ZO 4606 J=M13 :b3 = N*:FOI4 1-Hl TO H4:FOB 1 = 

HI ID Mil; IF CHKCTI-H0 OR T -F I THEM I- 

H1I:GOTO 4640 
PF 4GLO G7rHAN07 CT , I> : IF «7=H* THEH 4640 

"jK 4GZB IF G7<J THFH .|-6?:BIrT 

III. 4G40 HFHT IlHFKT T : IF »3<>H0 THEM F1=B 

3:G2=J 
B(S 464V8 HETUAM 



IT 4HOE1 r OH I HI ID HI:. 11 HU 

IP 4010 TOR I. HI IO HI. I:. II HHD1(1,I):!I 

IlilHB THFH T-Hl!l:i5<T) -Ml 

VH 4A70 HTHT T:TF .11 Hfl 1 HI H J5 IT) "H0 

ID 40 It> HI HT T:H! IUHH 

BH tiODO I.O'.HH 41IFK* 

I4H JIIU1 bi MH:fl HU-G1-HU:IUH I-H4 TO HI 1 

IIP Hill ','.([) HO OR CHKCT1 Hfl Fill M 
BMO 

y.t, sole n hz:for thi to hi I 

HP 5828 G2=HICT, I) ;IF G2=H8 T KFH 5850 

HG 5030 G2=HAH07CT ,1* ! IF EI=N* THEN I=N13 

: &0T0 5050 
XG i04C r I T ; tl=G2 [ I H12 ; I -HI 
n 1«1B HFXT I 
L5 58(>0 HEXT T;IF GZ=Mt 1 SHO F1-H4 THFM r. 

170 
ZJ 5065 TF G7-HO THFH 51O0 
UT B0B0 G2-Gl;LOIO 120B 
AK HDD ci-Hll ;r-2 = HBi J = H13 !Sl = H0l F6B T -H4 

T6 HI 5TEP -HllIF 55 IT) =H8 OR BHK(TI=M 

* THEN 31*0 
JK 5110 iw I=H1 TO Ml ' 

KY 5170 C7=HAH07(T. II i IF G7-HB THFH El^B 
ZH 5130 TF G7-H1J AHD T H4 1IIFH GIG7 
IU SI 40 IF G7CJ THFH J"CZ I FJ "T : I"I(1I 
F « 1IH HtXI I 

jn Mnii hekt T : IF ciOmi ahd rzOHe mtH 

G2=J :F1=FZ I 60T0 120* 
C5 5163 IF GlONll THEH SI09 

ftP S17B ft ' H7 :07 H0 : TOH T-H1I TD Ml 7 :T- MIC 

N4.I) IF F-HB THEH T.l'lfl 
MM 518* IF HAH02<H4,I)=I THEM Sl»8 

KH 3104 B2-H11 

CA 5190 MEHT HIF B2-NB THEN 941B0 

LJ 520B B2=HBlF0R I = H1 TO Hi* f &2 = hl (N4 , II 

It? G2=M8 THEM S218 
VE 521* G2-H0HD7CH* , I> I IF G7 = H0 THEN 1 = 18 

;B2=M0;GDT0 5230 
HM 5720 B7=G2 

BK 5738 HEXT I I IF B2=H8 THEH 548* 
RH 5740 Fl=H4iG2-Hll JGOTO 170* 
HZ 340B Gl -HO:0-HSZ: r DH T-HZ TD H4:9"DR I- 

Hl TO HI 3 
H5 5410 G2=HAH02 IT, IJ 5 IF G7 = H0 THEH 5440 
P-H 542* IF C2=N11 AMO T=H4 THEN G1 = G7:G0T 

. O I14B 
17 5439 F1=T:T-H4 LI-H13 
Mil 344B HEKT IlHEHT T i IP blOlW THEH GOTO 

1790 
CY 5450 FOR I = H1 TO H13 : C2-H AH07 CHI , I> : IF 

G7=H* THEH 54 7* 
VE 5460 F1=H1;I=H13 

RU 5470 HEHT I : TF [. 1 O HO THEH 12 00 
HG 34 IB &Z-Gl;ri-H4lLGIO 1Z0B 
HH L.OBU IF- LY-IRUHF AMD IIOIRUM* THEH K = 

Fl : KOTO 6970 
LT 6093 IF LV=F1 AMO LV=M THEH K-H9 
hd gobs if ror "= T > r SPD 1 AND Fl-ITI DP ILVC 

> THUMP AND F1=TH0HFP» THFN BOIB 

UP BO I O IF Fl.bC-Hl. BHD FlOlV THEH K-fllG 

05UB GHOBlGOTO GBIO 

TL &020 = C1 itl-li ;P = Cl :Dl=Tl:K = N0:G.01iUr) 

GI4D:F. n T n fiO*0 

TA IiOlO H-Cl LBlTTl : B-CZlDl-TZ: GOSUH blBB 

IU 6940 IF C0>H52 THEM «068 

HC 6043 HAH02(B1 J Bl =B : H AHD 1 (01 , 0) =0 

£1 B0BB HAHD2 IF 1 ,B[M J Hb 

EJ 6*65 G05UB 620*1 &0SUB ?S«0 I C0=C0» N2 

DC 607* HKF1, BEili -HeiRETURN 

LJ 6100 FLAG=H1:IF GM*="H" THFH &DSUO 614 

B :RFTUHH 
Hll BUB BT-BTtHllRETUHH 
PI B14B FIAG-HB:IF C«J — N" THEH GD3UB BH7 

D IHETUHH 
Gf: 6150 PVHitm KllllDN 
AMI 6209 &05U9 7200 
BP «210 FOR I=M8 JO N3:P05ITI0H NO r T : i MM 

6; f>05ITI0H 29 r l!7 HH6 J " ":NF 

HT I 
UT 5730 FOR T HO TO HI:PDlITtbN 20 , I : T BH 

6;" " :HEXT I 

IF 97*5 TF Cb>N5Z THFH RFTUPH 
HI 6300 R = FLAG. 
UL 0310 T-Hl I?" (F I AL Kill ; POKL ■jSJ4».ll( 

ruR i -hi io m_. * ( ! r I fll. MU) » I U J 
00 6320 POKE 5 1249 , 1 10*F*I I HEXT I:P0KE 53 

249, H* 
DH 6325 IF C0=51 THEH POSITION 17. HI:" UH 

(,;'■ "IPO^ITION 17, MI:? MH6; POKE 

53250,H0 



«0 Page 6 - Iisuc M 



HK «3 IB If R rial. T Hi H It 01. All ', CI I Al, HI]: 

boio Diia 

HI t- I -j- a T L a L H ; B I I ll« H 

KI 64»0 GO SUB 6850 : POSITION t*5.Hl:' BH6 ; " 
no cards left in deck" 

V5 6410 FOP I = HI TO 38:P0NF 01 *NJ , I : r.ltMIK 

6706:r<EHT I: SOUND H I , HO , NO . HO 
MI M7B r«B TNI Til l?B:TI SITCK(Ha]Ol5 

OH STRIGCHO)=HO THEN I=128:HEHT TiGOTO 
6430 
GC 6425 HEKT I 

ZL 64 JO IF GHS="M" THEN 6470 
SH 6440 FOR I-ttl TO H4 : 54 tl) = H1 I IF K=I TH 

FM SSCTH-NO 
FB 64H0 HEKT I 
au 6J7H co-jiiR ohob:pokf di *ht, no :hf turn 

'i/ (SID POttF ■13JiS,NO:'i 5TB 6 (PSI : GOSUB d 

650 
DT 6510 &OSUO 8656: POSITION Hi, Ml;? HH6!" 

'■nil scor* you scored "jSSj 

RT 658:0 S$=STRS(ATf : GOSUB 6650:^ BH6 ; " a 

t»pi stored ";SS 
HA 6536 FOR 1 = 111 TO 54: POKE DL + H 7 , 1 : UOSUB 
G796:50(JN1> HOj HO.NOj NOiNtXl li^UUHP H 

l,H«,IM,tM 
BU 6540 J,ii',IJ[| ] ItlOU ; CU-iUI BBSS 
HU ii/O TDR T-OO TO lO STEP H7:'iOLIHD ho, 

r « m ? , 1 b , « d : f n n h-mi t n hiiifki h j s on hd 
HO, NO, He .NOiHtMT T 
HP EFSfl FP-dB^IFp-Ntl I FlBG=FP 
PC fcjHB TF 'i TBIC [NO) THFH »>5 

0.1 6590 POfcE 77, HO: GOSUB 6754 

CS 66B0 IF PS = AT THCH 6620 

HS 6602 IF 6»f:"H" THEN 6610 

MR 66B5 TF PS>AT THEH Pt, PLi» H 1 1 bOT 6620 

HS BbOB AL «I.IH]:GDID ttlll 

IE 6610 IF PS<AT THEH PG=PG*N1 l GOTO bbZO 

7L 6614 AG=flGtHl 

VP 6620 GAnE^GAHEtHl : 5$=STRS fGAHEJ JGOSUH 

665*;POSITI0H HB,HO:-> ItNb ; "q •imp ";3*j: 

SS=ST«S (PG> sGOStio 6tso 

MY BB30 ■' HM*,;" yDU " i S t J : * fiittj < At.) : 

GOSUB 6658:' UH6;" m "ji* 
TS 6648 GOSUB 6800: GOSUB 19812: GOTO 188 
AK 6650 FOR L = H1 TO LEN (SS) s T =UAI CSS [I , I 1 

1 :T-T + J5;S-S!(L.L>=PHR4CT> :*E.«T I, : RE TURK 
JY 67BB FDR H"Hi TD H7 lOUMD HD , II , H ID. Ht 

: SOUND Hl,43, N18, MbiNtXT HI 50UHP HO, HO 

. MB , H«-Rt 1IJHH 
RH 6750 POKl PL*M7,HO ;T BR I-HB ID 111 ; POM 

T1DH HB, I : » BtH6 | •■ 

":HEHf HHETUHH 
LI 6B86 IF CD<5J THEH RETURN 
KF 6810 SSCFIT =HO:tiElUflN 
LT F.HiB AT=4T+rFl=Hl)+(Lr=Nl) 
EC 685* IF (CAflDl=Mll AND Lr=N4) DA CH-H 

4 flHp G2=H11> THEN AT=AT+H5:G0T0 68&0 
tO BUSS HETURH 
HU 6BBO GOSUB B850 : PO'iI T TOM Hl,Mft:T HHF.J" 

i got the black iuik "1 

cnsilB 6998!b0TO 6B9» 
He tto7B Pi=pi< cn-Hi > * ci tt-hi i 

Htl EBT5 TF (CIMI1 AMP F|"P(i) OP (IV Hi 

HD COHDl-HUI THEH P * - P1>H S [ LOT D 6600 
CR 1B7? BFTLJRH 

■,K EBBO COSUB S850:P0SITI0H Nl,Ht:? NN6 J " 
VOL) 901 The blJLh HJI ■ J '■; 

GOSUB 694 
ZA 68fB t>USUB 6 ,'TS B ; CO -jU B H OBB : R I TL1R H 
PO (1100 FOR 1=30 TO S0;S0UHE» HO , 1 , H 1 1 , M 1 B 

;FOKE 710, 1*4: HEKT I: SOUND HB J He,HB,HO 

:POKF 71B,HB ! BFTLIOM 

hC dub ran u-mi td ma stfp o r> . milihi: h 

V . 1 S * H , H 1 a , 1 : 'j III! HP Hlj30*H,Hia,I]HEMT 

H 
EH 6945 FOR H=N1 TO «6 I FOB I-N7 TO H4 tit 
? -HllSOUHD HO, 15-H. N8,HJ I SOUHf) Nl.JB* 
1tH,N10, IlPOPTE 719, 1*20 i HEKT I 

HA t.1".<] 'i-IHIMB MB , HO r HB , MO:HE XT H:"iOllHP HI 

. HO,HB,HB:PnKF ?lH,HO:HlllinH 
MR 7BB0 T=H1 
BV 7810 IF CARb>Nl! THEH C AHfr =CARD -Hli ; I 

T4H1ICDT0 7CUU 

AD /OIB PFTIIRH 

HF 71DB SS-"..»f I" !HS="; :": TF T>H1 THEH SS 

= "_+\|";HS--'<-'- 
TO 711* ir f>2 ?Ht* 4S="_4J |";H* = "> --TF 

T5T THFH SS="_* A I M ; HS="/. " 
tfB 71SB F=CARf>fHl :«$ = STR$CF) I ■• f HX , Ml) S H / 

H 

0U 7155 IF r>l THEH <bS = "1B";IF F>10 THE* 



a', ■■!/■■: II I :> 1 I IHtM uS "(l/"i[f FJ12 T 
ill h al "K/" 

SG 7156 IF F>H1I THFH AS.-"*/ 1 " 

EA 7-1S7 FDR H=Hft TO Ml; SOUND H0.H17.H8.H4 

^HEKT MlSOUND H6.H0,H6.N0 
HA 7160 POSITION B,Bls? HH6;"i |"lP-0*ttI 

ON B.B1 + M1:-' BH6I" " I AS ! POSIT ION 0+HJ. 

BLtHl 
',M /■I/O ■■ UHb;"|":PCtSlTIOH 0,Blt-H2l? ttN6 : 

Sf!POSTTTOH B.DKHI:' UN t, ; " »■■■ ; H i J " J ■' i R 

FTJRH 
TM 7290 FUR H HI TO HP: HE HI W:W1 HIFiH 

1.1 7I0B POKE Oi: , NO :l Uk T=H1 TO H4lA = H0lB = 

Ml :l OR I HI I O Hli 

RH 711B rjAWD -H&HD1C f , I J I IF CAR0 = H0 THEH 7 
!■• 

II H 7 I JO Bl- MUTM-H* iCOiUB 7 100 

OR 7115 HAHfji C I T »H I i H I 3 J Ift. C 1 MHI .5 Hit)* A 

>-GIIH$CCARD? : A - A * H 1 
DO 7I4B »HBJ:IP B>2Ct TMIM It H] 

UG 7J3U mil IlMCMT IIRETURH 

IK 7S0B o:tH»BU Kli' I If LOJMS2 THEH PFTUP 

M 

f.L 7SiO rflRO D ; H-Hl :B-1-H3 t D 1 HH4 ; I 01 

i (. 7E1B II HAWl CA r A) <>"•" IHLH fl-A + MllBl 

BJtHT:tOTO 757B 

[H 7F.IB HANPllfi,fl) CMR4 [OJ r bOIUO 7100 

ZL 7540 TF HAH&SCA*H1,A*H1>="«" THEH fz fO 



HV ,'!■,« POMIIOH B1HI,t!l: ' flip.; 



! POSTTI 



OH D>HI,01*Hll' HBd; 1 ' ":PBMT10H B<Mi, 
B|t«I:J H* 6 1 ■■_" 

FH rVhO PQSTTTOH Rti! , ll I Id! : ' UHFiJ"^ 1 

flu 7t?e nriiiPH 

MH 8S00 POKE 36,166: POKE 85 , 147 : BFHIflH 

KU 8fl5fl POKE 8B,t*0:P0rE BS , I It : RFTIIHH 

B8 8900 IF FLOG=HO THEN UO^Ufl H«50:POSITI 

OH N1,H»:' BH6j'Hnjur I pad" : POST T TDK 7B 

, M« : ? »Hbj ■' 

Frl 8586 &8SUB 9888 

Kt *0fl0 S=STICK (HO) SIF STRIGCH0)=HO THEN 

^30* 
Vtl ?828 IF 5=15 THFH 9BOB 
NT JBiB POKE if, N0:H=t5=H7>-*5=ll) 
IT 104U V- ti-Hii) -<S = 14) :IF U(>H0 THEN PH 

SC¥,V+J6)=BLS 
RH MHO K=KtN12*H:IF K<58 THEH X=50lLK=Nl 

: C O T O ? I C, B 

A7 11 1(1 TF KjfM TMIM » lf4:IX H I I : CO I O 'J 
IBB 

th *120 T-T*32NWiIF r<92 THEH ^=?2:LV=Hli 

GOTO »1B0 
EH lliO IF V>108 THEH f=18fl ! LV=H« ! SOTO Jl 

6* 
SU 9140 LK,=LX*HILY = LV4W 
1H 4KB POKF 13H8 , K: PMS Clfj T*jO) -BIS :GOTO 

9404 
IG Jiee Ll=LY«ill3-H13tLK:CftR0=ASC<HAHD$Cl 

1,L11) IT CARD-MO TH1M TSOB 

HP *J«1 IF FLAG=N0 TrtEN 0=N0;G0TD f310 

DD ?&0t BJsmilP LV = F1 THEH 9310 

UU S-3*6 FOR 141 TO HlXlZF HAHC 1 CF 1 , Tl it H 

THEN I=H1J:NFMT T:COTO 1SOB 

CF TJ1J7 HfKT T 

LH 9310 FUR T = Hfl TO HO STFP - 1 - 5 : 10UH& HG 

, 58, 10,1 IHEKT I;SDUHD HO . HB , HO . HB : C AHD 

1=CAND 
DO 9320 FOR I=H3 TO H6IPDSTTTOM CIH*H1)#H 

3-H5,LV*H4 + I ! . 7 ttHBJ" ":HEKT I 

AU »3Z2 HAH OS CI I ,1 1)-"T" 
HG 932J TF I K=H1 THFH FOB T~H4 TO Nt:POiI 

TIOH LK ,* YWH4* Tl " KHfi;" ":HEKT I : Lll I (I 

934B 
KI »J16 If I^AI^DSCL1-H1,L1-N1>= , ■♦ , " THEH 93 

4B 

CO *330 B= fLXtHl]*HS-H5;Bl = L¥»Hi4tH3 iPDSTT 

ION B.01:'' ami :■■!■■! POirTTiih h,hi<m. ■ 

BH6 i " I " iPOSITIOH B.B14H2L1 HH6i"l" 
6Z 9334 POSITION B,Bl+*3:? HH6; 1 '^" 
IM 9340 IF HAHD$CL1*N1.I.1+Wi»="»" TRFH 91 

H 
It, 9342 B- tLK»Hll«hI~Nl :fH = LYnH4t HI I P04I1 

IOH H,Hlr" BHtj" (-■'iPOIIIIUN B,BltHl:^ 

BHC j "_ " 
HO 934 4 Pfl ITT TOM B,BHH?:> IIHI> ; ■■ ■■ : l>n '► I T I 

OH l,BIH3:" BH«i"Hl 
VI IliO 1 L V ; ti-HB : Bl-HB : HflFtDl S.LY, CfiRCI -MS 

: r,0'>UB 71 BO: 111 [I V, I! ARC I HO :KI T [|KN 
AH 1SBO TOR I "Ml TD M12;T,OUMD HI), I II ,Hli , 

HSlNENI l:S0UttD H6, NO , HO , H6 •- GOTO 9000 
TO 1680B (.OiUO B600;IF PS = r>T THEN RE^TOPF 
16500:G0T0 16230 



[LI 


ICiDJO 


HE 


1 Nil, II 




16280 


rn. 


16040 


HF 


16 100 




if., no 


KH 


it, i .J ii 


H7 


iciflo 




MH HA, 


SU 


16210 




OH H^ j 


re 


1 1. J 1 <s 




OH H5, 


ck 


16380 


HO 


16310 


or 


] !■ ', . tl 



It LMt "II" THIN llildll 

IF PSSA1 THEH Rr9T0RE 16. 1 HO I I.OTO 

DFSTORF l64(]0:GOTO !(,,' HO 

TF P'i)tl THFM RFSTOHF 16 400:1.0 10 

HF STORE 16300 

FOB 1 HI TO DlBIU n fip»|- ", ■ (■■ ■! . I 1 | 
N7tl:' «*I6;HAND$ ;HEKT I 
FOR I=N4 TO N6:REA0 H ANDS ! PO^ I Tl 
■7*1 It tUH6;HAHD» :NEHT 11 RE TURN 
FOR I=H1 TO N6:REA6 HoNDi : P05 I TT 
Mail: 1 HHb:HAHDf : H1H1 I: HI. TURN 
DBTQ | I I M I I I I tl I I 



nam I I I I I 
onm I I I I I 1 



I I I I 
I I I II 



KM 16340 RATA I I I I I ( I I I I I II 

EI 15350 DATA I I I I I I I I I I I I M 1 1 I I 

OH 1636B Mid I MINI II M III I I 

JB 16460 ttATA I I III I I I III III I 
II 

JT 1B41B Dfllfl | | | | | 1 | III 



Dh 1 


16420 


DATA 


1 II 1 


1 1 1 


1*1 


16430 


DATA 


1 1 1 


1 1 1 


MH 


1 E440 


DA 1 A 


1 1 1 


1 1 1 


i:h 


[r.i'.H 


DA 1 A 


1 Ml 


III III 


H> 


16500 


DATA 


II 1 


1 llllll 


DI? 


1 r ■. 1 H 


DATA 


1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 


HI 


16530 


DATA 


1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 


iij 


16530 


DATA 


1 1 1 


111 III 


HU 


1«548 


DATA 


1 1 


1 1 I I 1 


1 '> 


1 BE&B 


DO ID 


I | 


1 1 1 1 1 



I I 



1 1 1 
I 



nz 



III II 



I I 



III 
HOOD Pin PfiC* £*521 , HANOI CN4.H13) ,HAHH 
7 CH4 ,l|]1 .It IB1 , Hi CH4) , LAVSCH4) , AS CH2) 
, f: AH & i ( 4 O ) , M AM D 1 ! «, 2 ) j C MK ( H 4 J 
7T 1TOB1 DTH HT CN4 , H I I J , CMi I H 1 ) OS ( N4 > 

fi liBie t iht chzhhhc ttttt)) :IF T = H# THEN F 

LAG-HI : r V I I t.1, 
01 19412 ? SHe;"*": GOSUB H«B 
7U 11t!i:> ft l MO : r'i MO: IIAHD', CHI > "»■'■ (|aNl) f - r 

M531-"*"' : MAMBf tM7) HAMP* 
CD 19016 GO^LIB l9IBQ:rDP I HI IO H4|1S'I) 

=H1lHEXT I: IRUHH HO 
CG 19020 GOSII0 110 
LR 19100 A-0:FOP T-HI TO Hi 3 : CARD -PACK i I) 

160 SUB 7000 IHAHDI [T, CARD! -CARD 
WG 19110 CBRD-=PACK(ItH13) ICD^UH 7BOB:HAHb 

zil , cAft[>J-CAOD:HeXT I : C6-1 7 : GOSUB BABO 
LT 19120 GOSUB 7300 : C ARD = PACK *CD) : IF GHf- 

"H" THEN 19190 
flj 19125 GOSUB 760Bi TP1IHP-T :■",*■ "hrjrlL'M 

F T>HI THEH S$="t l«b=" 
pi- hub if i>-ni TfitH ^i"oij»wN;";tF f> 

hi theh l$ = "5pades." 

YD 19140 GOSUB 8658: FOP T~HB TO MJPO'.ITl 

ON HO, I : ? BN6J" 

":HCKI 1 
MA 19160 POSITIOH HI J, HO:"* MW| , *tri>*tP« ■'; 

it 
PA 19190 GOSUB OftOti : RETURN 

FK 1130B GOSUB S BSH I P U S 1 1 10 N 28, N*:? «N6 : 

■'plPi>;» uit":BCTUnH 
JH 1T4BO pu.iriUH ■• J N4:? BN6;" 



OU 11402 POSITION N0,M6:-> BH6J 



ME 114BO CHS-"H"!CD10B BBS* ! POSI TTOH 7B,H 

a:" she;" uiii4.iv Etapte " 

LV 19410 CO^Ue e608;P0STTTOH HB,*/:"" nut,; 

" "i POSITION HB,H6: 

1 BHOr'/Z/HAI BlJRCF/^•II^.T///"■ 

XI 19412 FOR I = N9 TCI NlB:fOMlIOH N8 , I : f 
tun: "// f ////////// f//ff ft" ' : NE H T I 

PI 19420 POSITION H8,M.l?:" BH6 ; -'////HI ACM 

• MARIA////*' 
HU I94IB POMIIOH H»,N8 = ? BH6:>1 " 
HE 19440 A-iTICHtHOJ : IF STRIC (NOJ -HB THEH 

194B0 
ftP 19445 IF A=15 THFH I944B 
KO 1945B IF A=13 THFH POSITIDH PH,«H;' n 

Hh ; "| " : po'.i 1 1 an «i,i»: ' u«b r "/" : bM5-"h 

KT l946t> IF A = 14 THEN POSITTOH H9,Mft:i HH 
Bj'1 "sPOSITIO** H9,H10;? ON6 ; "/" ; GHS=-"H 



CL 19470 GOTO 19440 



Tjige 6-l«SUe 12 



1,(1 1-hjmo inn ■ Hie 10 hu iirP H3 : idiihd h 

8,60,NI.<I,HIO: 'hOIIHD Nt , 16 , H 10 , T - HF It I I 

: -,aUHC *u, HO,HH .Fill! <><11IN& Ut ,ND , Nil , Hti 

Mr in in for I N7 ill BIS : POS I f l on nt,!; 1 

IIKI. ;■' ■■:«!« I 1 

AO 11-^flO L 1HI !NJ . 2»flNp («OJ 1NJI aiblHlD 
Fll l*-jOfj [F linf."H"' IHtH POKI /lI,WS:Pfl« 

E 7M r lB?:l>CII[ 765,1 SPOKf ?rih,L:[, 1 

AH 19S1B POKE 71 2,114: POKE 7B4,im:P0KE 7 

8 5, L :POKl .'in. I 

FJ nil) h,USUP 6850:GOSUB 6738 : f*MS tY , Y*38 

)-6LS 

JT 11520 fc = 5« i Vr)J :PHS IV .IftJt) -BIS 

III HFJ( LK-Nl [L1-H1 : POKE 53740,*: »r IUHM 

HP ?BOB(l Pint HI,M«:> :FOP TrHl ID M< ; I UH 

i = m re UXtf ha«f>?<i. d ;■■ »i tiem I: 

■r 1 HEKT T ;LND 
LH IDU1U POKE BJ-HO:-" :IOB I=Hi TO H4:FOH 
I = H1 TO HIS: 1 * MOMD1 IT , 1) ; " "iSHEKT II 

I litem T;EWD 
BM 7JB0B KO-Ubhl-1 :«2rNl*MI :M7 NZtHi:H4=H 

?*H2 rM3-H4*Hi;M6=H3*H3:H7-<K6*Hl Bt-N/t 

F41lH9=F*8*Hl :H187:MB*H2:Hll = Ma+«3 
KCF 22883 HF,7-He*H4:H13 = H12*Hl:H52=52 : CAWF 

zH0:PC = H0:or.-HBifRUMF-WO 
O/F 2 rues pom mo, 152 s GOAPHIt:* 2B;pOKt M 

n.HB:POKE 7QB,b0lP0KE 709 . I 4 : PO KE 712, 

114 

jn zzai-fl OPEH *fHl,#4,H0,-'l>iiGI»lir.lS' L 

KK 22020 C=8*8:PQKF CiNI.B? 

PF 22938 H=156:]L = H6:pO*E C*H4.L:PO«F C*K3 

,H 
IP 22040 h-W* :L=MB iPOKE C +8 , 1. IPOKE C«?,H 
UU 22*59 O U-,« IO&H(-Knhi3LUFl ,- l . 161 
HV 22060 C1D*.E R1;P<1KE 756,150 
EI 27Z38 PMf E#lJ--'»" iPWStOOOt -"•" : PMi I.X2) 

=PH4 
XU 27250 BX*="VW>i>y>>>>i>)»>>}>>>>y>y>> 

>¥•" 

BU I7ZH OLf ="#•*•»*»»»*»** W»T»TT»*»t»»* 
MO 27256 liCIlt -"»»?• Hit *55H-55*+5*! "EH* 

istt^ttr 1 

IH 27260 PH4 1N1J ^■■*- 1 ;PF4S(450>=" , *' , iPN**Hl> 

= PM$- 
EF 777H0 T -PEEK (1061 "16 SPOKE 7B4, 114:P0KE 

559,62 iPOKF (,71,M4 
(tB 27290 POKE 54771 , I - POKE 53256 . HI I PQKE 

33Z77,MI:UTAB=PEEK(134) 'PEEK (135JW256: 

STftD-PtEKtl40J+PEEK(14l»»Zt5-6 
SH 773B0 crfi-Ht256 + 1824-ArAB:HI-lHTtGFFS 

/23G1 ;LB = 0FF5-HI»7.5BiPOKC 1>T AB + H J. , LO ; P 

DKE UTAFJ<Hl,nl 

KB 27110 Y=92;P0KE 53357, HI ;P0KE 53258. Ht 

;PF+5(298,323»=pc:d* 
US 27317 PCB*= 1 'wr* + S51H-55+ I M !»■•* 

■*»**•»•■*■ 1 m*tH,e j i7H=Kttin«c «i, 

IB 
D2 774430 DL =PE EK (SFiO 1 * Z36«PEEK C 56 1 i * H 4 
HA Z/41B P0«E PI *H6, 66:PQKE BL. +-H7 . HB [PIMt 
[,Ltg, 136S POKE Dt*l,6B:F>8KE BL+10.144: 

POKE 0L*11, 1*8 

nn 27438 ran i=hi2 to 2bipu*:e dl+i,h4 : »fk 

T I 
UL 2745B POKE tL-t29,65:POKE BL *S* , PEEK (56 

81 [POKE DL+31,PEEK(561) 
OT 2746D POKE 88,H8:P0KF 8 1 , lift! POSI T TO" 

KIF.MI1:-' HMO;" 

":GOSiie HOOO;HtlFjRM 
HH 2/588 GRAPHIC* IflTPOKE 7BB,112:POKF 7B 

1,112; POKE 71Q,11Z;FDKE 712,112:87112: 

[:7«7:Pail +l)->j*,t> 
OB 2753B fDSITION 1.1:7 HO ; "HAl BlIHIit MHIS 

!":■. (I : H 1331G05UB 27608 
FtK 27540 PAVITIOH 8,4:7 H6 : ".and" : P-1S2 : GO 

■iUO 27600 
HG 27550 P05ITinM 4 r ■> : ' 146 i "M>JIi3:«iiU:»U" : 

R=125:C05Ue 776BH 
UT 27S68 PO5ITI0H 1,1;? Wa i "a'jjjll I.MIJ !A1 

3" i H-»0:G05IJ& 776118 
VU 77S7D TOH H-l TO SO:MEKT M 
1.7 17308 rue 1 = TQ I:-iDIM» I,e,B,B!HIKT 

X 
n Z7S98 fiFHICH 
JTf 11*690 F7ip*l!fl = «»H 

Tk 77MO IDt W=l TO 14:'>DII»P C,R,10.F4 
CP I764B POKE rjjM + FUHFKT HI C -C+ 1 I O F T UPH : 

HETUflH B 



MT trl^S P.EM ""■»« »■■ BPBW jt M K M K W W M mHnm M 
FH tTltA VI M » UHI'.F LIllllK, 2 » 

jk z/»95 fiEli » tmrMter Set » 

PO J7?96 SI H • — * 

PM irttt CFEH W POI.I 6 MtldfldlWE K 

Vi 7,'1*1B HEM K K HIi mm »n» w» nK MKH H KKW M M MKIH 

Fl» 1/717 REM 

OW 28400 HFtTOBF 71OBU:0PEH Bl . 8 , » , "D : t-MK 

15" 

UA ZODIO Flit 1=0 TO ItllilEltD C^PUl Bl , D I 

HENr ISCLO^F MICUD 
HI Z18UD DOIA 0,0.0,0.0,8,8,0,3,4,20,4,4, 

4, 21 ,0,0. 182. 183, 187, B,B, 8, 4 
LI Z»1I bnrA 6#, 102, 1ST. iBZ, lOZ, 162, 1»2. 

60, 24 , 56, 17B.74. Z4,24 , 24, 12* , 60. 1 B7 .If, 

12. ■' 4 , 411. ■»■ . 126 
UU 296 20 DiTA 17b, 0,14, 26,6, 6, 182, 60, 12, J 

O, 68, 60,106, 176. 17, 1Z, lib, 16,96, 124,6. 

6, 10 2,60 
■56 71010 FJflTfi CD, 102, 96, 124. (»», 1»7, in / . !< 

B, 170,6,0., 14, 12 ,12, 24 ,24,6* ,181,182,60 

, 102 , 102 , 102, on 
HO 2*048 lift T ft b8 .18 2, 182,62,6.6. 1BZ.6B, 10 

G. i B6, 178, 170, 170. 170, 170, 7:5 !t, IS 0,234, 

250,2 54, 170. 178, 178,243 
XC Z7BVB DOIA 175,171,176,131,170,170,178 

,lfl5,2a4,238.2JB,33B,ZIB J 2S4,170,17B,l 

86.2 58, lit, 146,186, 25*. I 7B,17B 
H8 29*68 OATA 151, 171 , 111 , 186 , 186 , 191 , 178 

,170, 191, 171. 1*1,171, 171, 191, 17», 178,1 

87,1117,1*7, HI, 171, 171, 170, 17B 
KU 29070 BOTfl 1*1,160,191,171,171.191,176 
,170. 191,lBa,191,lB7,l«7 r 191,17B,l7B, 1 

91 , 171,171, in, 171, 171. 170, 178 
JP 29B88 BflTfl 1*1,167,191.187.187,111,170 

,17B,lll,l87,191,17l,171,l»l,170,170,l 

6 6 , 1 7 , I 7 B , 170,170,178,178,255 
rv 29090 OftTA 149,165,169,16*, 17B, 178, 170 
,255.251 . 171,171,191,170, 178, 178, Z55,l 

98, 178, 17-8,250,170, 170,170,255 
PZ 73106 EvATA 165. 16^,lb^,169. 17B, 17B,17« 
,2SS, ft, 60, 182. 17, 74, 6, 24, 0,01. 68, 81, 68 
,81, 6ft, 81, 68 
LO 29110 BATA 191 , 187, 107 , 191 . 187 . 1B7 , 178 
, 170, 198, IB 7, 1*8, 167, 167, 190. 178, 178,1 

91,186,106,186,186,19 1,170,11-8 
JF 2*118 OAlO 198, 187, 107, 1B7, 167, 190, 178 
,1/0, 1*1, 186, HI, 186,186,191. 170, 178,4 

2,32.47,12,12,32,0.8 
Lfr 79130 DATA 1*1 . 186, 186, 187,187. 191-17B 

, 178. 1B7. ia.7,lll,lSl,187,187,17B,17B, 1 

»1, 1/4, 174, 174, 174,1 51, 17B, 176 
HT 19140 &ATA 171,171,171,171,187,174,170 

, 170, 187, IS7, IM, 1*1), 1117, 197, 170, 170. 1 

06, 186, 180, 106. 1 BO, 1*1,176,17 
UK 29150 OATA 167.191,167,167,167,107,170 

, 17ft, 42, 34, 34 .34. 14, 11,1,1,11, 34,34, 34 

, 34,42, B.B 
PH 29160 DATA 4Z, 14, 34,42, 32,32,0,8, 191,1 

H7,1B7,1B/,197,190, 171, 178 ,1*8, 1D7, 167 

, 19©, 107, 167, 170,17* 
EP 2917B Ctif t) 1*1,186. 191 , 171 . 171, 111, 17B 

,176, 191, 174, 174, 174, 174, 174, 178. 170. 1 

87, 187, 187, 107, 107, 191. 17B, 178 
VI 79180 DATA 34,34.34.34,14,6,0,6,107,18 

7, 167, 167, 1*1 , IB 7, 178, 178, 34, 34 , B, 34,3 

4,34,0,0 
L.U 29196 OATA 34,34, 14, 82, 8,8,8,0, 47, t, t, 

H, 32, 42, •, 0, 178, ID, *U, 86, 86, 06, 90, 98 
^.G 29200 BATA 17U,170,234 .734 . 714 , 17B, 11B 

I 7&4,l7e,17O,17B r 18L,lOb,9O,9ft,166,170 

, 7 J4, ZJ4, 250,250.754 ,21S4 ,ZS4 
LO 29216 D-ATA SB ,5B,'i8 ,58, 50 ,5B. 50 .SB, 170 

J 15B,86 h BS,05,B5.149.l4T,lZ3,BtI,2l«,85 

, 125,85,215,355 

CH ?*Z38 Dftlfl 112,112.248.112,117,112,240 
, 7 40, 176, 176, 176, 176. * 76, 176,176, 248, 6 
, 6,6, 8, 6, B. 0.0 



M.l 317 JO PA I ft It, ft , IF, 34B, 176, 17*,17*,17*il 
7O,l/O,|7O,l7O,l76,176,l70.l7(t,B,B,«,2 

9»,1Z-S,0»,21»,H* 

DM 29240 P4FA 117,112,240.117.112.112,240 

,112, 8, 24, 68, 126, 755, 219, 74. 126, 8, 8, 8. 

168 , 16B ,B,B, 6 
MS 29250 MID IS., IS, 15, 15. 8. 8,0,0,248. 74B 

, 748, 7 48, fl, #, 0, 0,7 ill ,ZSS, 8, 0,8,0,0,0 
f.V /IHtO D«lo 0,8,0, B, B,ft, 25*, 75T.,8,0,0,6 

, 2 40, 248 , 7 40, Z4B, 1/0,171 . I 73, 1 75, 175 . 1 

71,751. ZS3 
Ul 29 270 D*T» 8, 8 .ft. 63 .56, 58 ,"jH, 5-8 .0.0, B, 

25 5, 170, I/O, 1/0, 170, 53. 53, 53, 61, 61,51- 

33,51 
MM Z978B Ofilfl a, 8, 6, 63.61 , 51,3^,53.8.0, B, 

248. 11Z.11Z, 240, 112. 53, 53 ,35, 53, 61, 53, 

55.63 
ID 79I1B tor A 17.69,17,69,17,69,17.05,126 

, 05, 215, 63, 125,85, 2 15, 05, 74B, 246, 248, 2 

48, 248, 248, 240. 748 
til 2*JBO DATA S8, 58. 56, S-B , 56, 58. 58. 63 , 138 

, 96. 12B. 96, 126, 24, 30, 8.0. 74,68,126. 24. 

24, Z4,B 
UJ 29310 06Tb D, 24, 24,24. 176. OB, Z4, 6,0. 24 

, 40, 126, 46, 24, 8, 6, 0,24, 12, IZB,1Z, 24,0, 


Ct» 29328 DATA 178,169,169.165,163,149,14* 

,14 9. 61, 127, 115, 115. 115, 127, 115, 115. 17 

6, 115. 113, 12b, 115, 115, US-, 126 
E5 Z933B DATA 62., 115, HZ, 112, 112, 11Z.11S. 

62, 126, US, 115, 115. 1 13. 115, 115, 125, 127 

, 112, 112, 127, JIZ, 112, 112, 127 
IP Z*I40 DATA 177,112,112,127.117,112,112 

,117, 52, IIS, 112, 119. 119, 11 3,1 IS, 62, 1 15 

,113,115,127, 115,115, 115, 115 
II 29358 DATA izr, 28,28, 28.70 , ZB, 28, 127,6 

3, 14. 14, 14, 14, 14, 110, 68 ,113, 115, 118,1? 

4, 128, 126. 11*. 113 
UL 29366 PATA 117,112,112 ,112.117, 112, 112 

, 1Z7, 99, 111, 127, 127, 107. 91, 1*, 99,126,1 

15, 1 IS ,115, 115, IIS. 116, 11» 
HI 29I7B D-AIO 62,115,115.1111,113,115,115. 

62, 126.113, 115, 126, 112, 112. 112,112,62, 

116, 115, 115, 115, 115, 11», »9 
10 29360 OATA 125,115,115,126,115.115,113 

, 1 15, 62. 1 15, 112,62, 7, 3, 103, 62, 1±7, 28, 2 

B, Z8, SB, 28,28.20 
Cfr 29390 DATA 113,115,115.115,113,115,115 

,62,115,115, 115,115,113, 115,62,2 6,99,1 

9, 99, 1B7. 117,127,119,99 

KF 394BO DfiTfl 19,115.54.36,28,62,119,115. 

115, IIS. 118, US, 62, 12. 17, 12, 127, 3, 7, 14 

,28,56.112, 177 
RP 29418 PATA I 7ft, 171, 171 , 175 . 17S , 191 , 191 

,191,176. 176,176,176,176.175,176,176,6 

,128,128,124,118. 187.6,8 
HU 294Z8 DATA 8,24,56.128.36,24,6,0,16,74 

,28-30.76,24,16,155 « 



MP 22800 HEH 

AP 2ZBB1 KtH K HHT 57 LlStini 3 H 

PJ 22882 HEH » Caisflte Umlilir almns « 

AG 22883 HEM * — * 

VH 22004 HEM ■ PAGE 6 MACAZIHC * 

HO 22805 HFM ■ ■K K H K K K K X H K H * »■■■**»**»*« 

CL 22686 REM 

OV 220O7 POKE 106, PEEK (1051 -*:I.FIAPI1I« 14 

iprjKb 718.H0:POKr 78 6,38: POKE 7B9,14rP 

8«E 712.116 

K3 ZZ818 C5=PEEK (1B61 LC3ftA*E=C5W256: K UM 

"1 ,C56ft3Cl 

PC Z2820 AE5T0PF 79888:rOR 1=0 TO 18Z3:BE 
AR A:POKE C-,nniEtI . A:MFHT T:POKt 756, C 
5BASF/7S6 a. 



62 



Pagz o - iMut \2 



CONTACT 



FOR SALE 



ATARI SYSTEM. SOOXL, 1010 
recorder, I30XE, 1050 disk drive, 1020 
printer, much tablet, TO original 
software titles on tape. £420 the lot, 

preferably all together but will consider 
splitting into two systems, All hardware 
boned- Also PAGE o Atari User 
magazines, dust covers, disk box and 

•^nate disks. Tel. Steve on 01-907-61^4. 
Buyer MUST codes (XW London) 

XL SVSTEM: Atari SIMJXL, 1050 
Disk Drive, joystick, dust covers, 
magazines. Lots of software on disk in 
Lockable disk bus. AIL in immaculate 
condition- Will not separate £150. 
Ring 0343 (East Grinstead) 27072 

PHRIPHERALS: XCl 1 cassette 
player £15. Blackthorn printer interface 
£20. Atari Trak-Ball £10. Mierudeal 
baiterv backed dock for ST. £18,00 
im-557-111 

MAGAZINES: 60+ copies of Antic 

and Analog. Offers! li- Ryder - 
Broad hills 379098 

EXCHANGE: 1037 LQ printer, C/W 

spare ink rollers, dust cover, book 
AT AR [WRITER - disk, all leads etc. 
offered in exchange for a l 050 drive, or 

Mil St £70. Phone John on (065 76) 36} 

DISK DRIVE; 1050 good condition, 
£50. Assorted diiks and cartridges 
£5.00. For details ring 0787 7177* 

COMPLETE MAGAZINE SALE: 
PAGE 6 from issue 1 tu dale, Analog 
from issue I to July ST, Antic from 
>-,uu 1 tu July 87, Atari fab)Uscr from 
issue I to date. Approx 40 — issues of 
COMPUTE! ALL fur £100.00, Geoff 
051 -4 24-424 

XL SVSTEM: 800XL, tape deck, 
software, joystick, magazines. Only 
£65, Mr-K- Scotney, Pant- Y- Saw, 
Bwlch, Tynygongyl, Anglesey, 

C.wynedd, 1.1.74 SRG. 

XLKmROOXL, I05O drive, 1029 
printer, XC12 recorder, touch tablet, 
lockabk disk box, books, mags, gomes, 
utils, dust covers, blank disks, etc. 
£275, Tel, 061-339-CT07 

BARGAIN OF '68: SOOXL, 1050 Disk 

Drive, Quiekslior joystick, mags, disks. 
Excellent starter pack. Only £100. 
Write to M. Leach, 5 Owe Road, 
Spoffonh, Harrogaie, HG^ IAT 

Sflfl SET UP: Arari BOO and 1050 drive, 
software, etc. Braced as new, £240 ono. 
Phone Tuny on 0706 861 165 

XL PACK: SOOXL, 1050 Disk Drive, 
joystick + dihk--,, £130, 'Will deliver in 
Glasgow area. Tel. 0189 75917 

XE SYSTEM: 1 10XE and 1 050 Drive 

wilh 1.5. plate. Speech Synthesizer, 
word processor, arr programs, 
Turbo-Basic , machine code programs 
and all games. Complete with 10 
manuals, Besi offer over £200. Tel, 
0723-368781 

XL SYSTEM: SOOXL (rev.cl, 1050 
drive and disks £100, 1050 drive with 
U S. l>oubler and Laser With software 
£100. 850 interface with Centronics 
printer lead £80. I>e Re Atari £10, You 
Atari Computer £6, Mapping The 
ATari (revised:. Atari Assembler £5 
Telephone CREWE 6623S6 after 5 pm 



U1SK DRIVE: 1050 fitted with L'S 
DOUBLER and 10 Blank Disks. £70. 
Phone Steve on Bedford 46419 after 5 
pm 

XL PACK: 800XL, 1010 tape 
recorder, 1050 disk drive, 1027 printer, 
joystick, several bonks, disks etc. £250 
(0980) 33571 5731 (work) 

BARGAIN: Atari S00XL t 10 10 Data 
Recorder and 3 Joystick I £250 of up 
to date software for £80 '["el. Worcester 
53524 and ask for Richard. 

1027 PRINTER: Complete with 
AtariWriter - disk, Hardly Used. 
KKcellcnt condition £'75. Phone Chris 
Read on Milton Keynes (0908) 568788 

XL SYSTEM: Atari SOOXL, 1010 
Data Recorder, software, books, etc, a 

bargain at £80. Ring Justin on 106 794) 
467 after 5 pm 

XL SYSTEM: SOOXL, 1050 disk 
drive, Muonraker joystick and 
abundance of software, £299. Phone 
02(16 (Colchester; 384873 after 5.30 pm 

PRINTERS: Atari 1 029 printer 
AtariWriter I £TO, Also Atari S22 
tl:i-:i«iil pr hirer, ideal I'm detnuatal 
listings £50. Phone 010-49-2163-632:59 
or it may be cheaper to write to Shmin 
Cardan, Laser Bay, EESj RAF 
Bruggeo, BFPO 25 

XL SYSTEM: SOOXL, 1050 disk 
drive, touch tablet, Sony joystick, 
covers and over 70 disks. £150 ono 
Phone Adrian on Dursley (0453) 45562 
after 5 pm 

XE SYSTEM: I WXE, 1050 disk 
drive, 1010 recorder, all good condition 
with manuals and. 60- original 
software titles. £210 the lot. Tel. (0606) 
737332 

XL SYSTEM; XL and 1029 printer 
and paper, 1050 disk drive, disk box, 
touch tablet, 1010 and Phonemark tape 
decks, Assembler Editor cartridge arid 
many software titles for £460. Tel. 
0* 1 -962-49 35 weekends on ly . 

PROM PROGRAMMER: As circuit 
in Antic Dec. 85. Incorporates F5U 
and quality ZIF socket. Uses joystick 
ports. Operating software on disk, £30, 
9O0XL with PSU, £35, fllOdisk drive 
with Archiver chip and instructions, 
£85. Phone 0245 269030 

TWO ATARIS: BOOXI. - 400 
compurcrs, data recorder, 1050 disk 
drive, two joysticks and 40 games £170 
ono. Tel. 0J 641 3132 

HARDWARE SALE: I WXE and 

1050 drivt- with touch tablet, joysticks 
and in excess of 300 disks, 1020 plotter, 
WS20Q0 modem plus Datari interface . 
Phone Seth cm 01 S45 2570 

XL SVSTEM: SOOXL, 1050 and 810 
disk drives, XC1 1 tape recorder, 
joystick, over £200 softwares 
magazines. All in excellent condition. 
Everything for £250. Contact Dan on 
m -229-56 1 2 after 6 pm 

1050 DRIVE; Complete with Laser 
board- Mini condition. Open to offers. 
(0226) 767685 evenings 

XL SYSTEM: SOOXL with UltimMl 
chip, 1 050 disk drive, 1 1 recorder. 
£100. Telephone 091 -469-287 3 



HARDWARE OLD AND SHW: 
SfflrXl ■ and HOO computers. 1050 and 
810 disk drives, 027 NLQ printer, 410 
HSCOtf der. £ 300 wort h of software. Two 
complete svstcms for £295. Steve 0266 
551 122 after 7,00 pm 

INTKRl-Al ;E CABLES: 850 to 

modern. 850 to Centronics printer, 
XI . XF. to Scart monitor socket. £25 
the lot. May separate (0226) 7676S5 

evenings 

ORIGINAL SET UP: Atari S00, built 
in Basic, Centronics interface, 810 with 

Happy and Archiver chips, cassette 
player, joysticks, software, etc. £130 the 
lot. Tel. George 061 -432-4538 evening 
or weekends 

XE SYSTEM: Atari I30XE, disk 
drive, 1020 printer; touch tablet, voice 
master, US lloublcr,Ultimon, Light 
pen Remote joysticks. Bargain of a 
Life: i mc at on I y £ MXJ. Cal I George on 
0875 22120 after 6 pm, 

PRINTER: 1029 Printer, as new, in 
original box- £65 Phone Eric cm 090 
7224334 

»~HtT SYSTEM: SOOXL, 1050 disk 

drive with US doublet, 1010 Data 
Recorder , Joystick, software, All in 
v.g.c, £170. Write to G. Johnston, 52 
Castle Street, Montrose, -Scotland. 

XL SYSTEM: B00XL-, 1050 Disk 
Drive, 1029 printer, 1010 cassette. Lots 
of software, mostly new titles, Disks, 

etc. Worth £822 sell for £355 ono. Tel 
(0483) 37279 after 4. 30 pm. 



WANTED 



EX PA N DC ) V IS l( J N : I > ■< - 1\:\ • ■ iu- 
have a copy of Expirtdo Vision for. the 
Atari 800 for sale? Please cmntact Paul 
Daniels, C.'o 29 Hillersdon Ave, Barnes, 
London SW13 0BG 

KRENCHTELETEL ST: Is there a 
Mimtel Emulator program for the ST? 
If you have information, please contact 
me. Mercid'advance, Jim Flewkcr, 17 
Mill View Gardens, Wrawbv, Brigs, 
IJK20SSY 

GERMAN S-BIT PROGRAMS: I 

use a 1 30XE to teach (.rcrman. Does 
anyone have any programs written for 
German users which could interest* my 
pupils, Contact Jim Klewker, 17 Mill 
View Gardens, Wrawbv, Urigg, DN20 
FtSY 

MONITOR: MicrovitecT435 APPS 

14" colour monitor in good condition, 
preferably with swivel and till plimh, 
Please contact Nigel Moore, 65 Station 
Road, I jkenheath, Hrandon. Suffolk, 
Tel. 0842 860229 

PRINTER: Atari 1027 or 1029 printer 
around £50, good condition. Phone 
Richard. 0246 203051 

BOOK: A copy of 'Inside Atari Dos' - 
also instrucrions for Fig-Forth. James 
Cutler, 44 Water St., Great Harwood, 
Laws. BR6 7QR 

1029 PRINTKK: Will swap 
Hntcrprise's warp drive enhancemeilt. 

More details from Andy Simpson on 
0360- >1 1330 

PRINTER: Atari brand printer in 
exchange ftjr mv SaniTj Bclamait VCR. 
Phone Eddie. 0268 53*Wo 



PERIPHERALS: 1050 disk drive 

working, pay £"45. Also 1029 printer, 
working pay £40. And broken 
peripherals. Contact Paul Lynch, 
Millbrook, Oldcastle, Co, Mesth, 
1 reland. 

EPSON PRINTER: Epson RX80 
with parallel interface cable. 

; i ably priced plea>L Mi-. II m:/-. i: 
0705 584418 

MAGAZINES; Any back issues of 
Cimpure', Antic, Analog or any Atari 
magazine. Also a replacement keyboard 
for the 400. Contact R. I'reddy, 6 
Avenue Rd.. Staines, Middlesex, 



PEN 

PALS CONTACT 

ST USERS: t want contacts from 
anywhere in the world. All letters 
answered. Kieron McMahQTl, 121 

Grange Abbey Crescent, Kaheny, 
Dublin 13, Hire 

U,K, ADVFNTURERSi I would like 
tn get in touch with adventurers to swap 
hints, solutions, ere, all letters will be 
answered. 1 have an 800X1. and a 
520ST, Please write to Steven Reid, 9 
Troon Place, Papatoetoe, Auckland, 
New Zealand 

ST USERS: To swap hints and lips on 
a world-wide basis. Will reply to all 
letters- Pierro Macari, Unit b. Captains 

Hill, l.eutlid, Co. Kildare, Eire. 

I.S. PLATE: Owners oflhis Utility 

please get in touch so we can swap 
hints, tipSj etc. Write or call; Kev 
Munto, 4M Susses Si,, Bishop 
Auckland, Co, Durham, Dl.14 8JD 
Tel. 0388-608125 

PROM WEST GERMANY: I am 

aged lo and looking for pen-pals 
anywhere in Kuropc. I ownanflOOXL 
and disk drive and will answer your 
letters promptly. Please write to: 
Richard Chlup, Sicben lluegel o, 48 
Bieleteld I , West German? 

AMERICAN PEN PALS:H-hit 

pen-pals wanted to swap hints, tips on 
programming, playing game*, ally age. 
Write to Edward Oleman, 56 Eversley 
Park Road, WLnchmote Hill, Londnim 
N2 l.Engknd 

ST USERS: I am a lonely ST user and 
I would like to make new friend', from 
anywhere in the world. Please write to 
David Morgan, 2 Wem Ddu Road, 
Ammanford. Dvfed, South Wales, 
SAIS2NH 

S J" CSERS; To exchange public 
domain software and magazines. All 
letters replied to, Wrhe to: Antonio 
Angel, Alpes 620, Lomas, Mexico 
I 10(H) D.F., Mexico 

8-BjTTERS: I own an SOOXL, 1050 
disk drive and 102 1 ) printer- I'm 
interested in exebange of hints and tips 
etc, I will answer, ill Imers if possible, 
so write TO S, Hirsr, Tyn-y-Maes, 
Cemaes, Analesey, LL67 ODE 

XE PEN PALS WANTED: To give 
me a few rips as I have in si become a 
new Atari owner. All letters replied 
Please write to J. Downey, 40 St. 
Benets *ay, Teoterden, Kent, TN30 
6QCl 



Page ft — Issue J2 61 




vt&M 



r 



Garry Francis gives his 
opinion of one of the most 

talked about adventures of 
recent times - after having 
finished the game 



Over the past tew years^ the Adventure: column has gradually 
grown longer and longer and longer until reaching the four page 
epics of the last few issues. Commencing with this issue , I 
intend to cut down the length of each article, but from next 
issue onwards, I'll try to cover two or three Adventures in each 
issue. This means that I needn't spend as much time on 
research, the Editor gets mure flexibility in magazine layout and 
you, the readers-, get more hints in each issue. 

Lei me know what you think of the 'cut down' format and, as 
always, suggestions for future columns ate more than welcome. 
My address is at the end of this article. 

Now, as promised last issue, let's take a look at The Pawn. 

THE PAWN 

I first heard of The Pawn about two years ago when our 
illustrious Editor told me about a great new Adventure for the 
ST thai had unbelievable graphics (I think he was just trying to 
get me to buy an ST!). G>mputer & Video Games previewed 
The Pawn in April 1986, The article was chock full of 
superlatives and the accompanying review gave it full marks. I 
could hardly wait for the 8-bit version to be released. 

As The Pawn became available for more and more machines, 
the computer pres* gave it rave reviews and glowing comments. 
Imagine my disappointment when I did eventually buy the 
game and found it to be a bit of a dog! What had happened? 
How had the computer community been so thoroughly conned? 

When I re-read all the reviews, I realised that some reviewers 
had been hoodwinked by personal demonstrations from the 
staff of Magnetic Scrolls. They had obviously been shown how 
*clever' the program was without being shown all its 
shortcomings - not to mention its bugs! Of all the reviews I 
read, only one of the reviewers had actually completed the 
game! The others had wandered about the countryside and 
hadn't even solved any puzzles! This is disgraceful. The end 
result was (in my opinion) the greatest marketing swindle in 
Adventure history. 

I said there was only one reviewer who had actually finished 
the game. That happened to be fage 6's own John Sweeney. 
His is the best and fairest review of the lot (and even then, I 
think he's a bit generous), so if you're chinking of buying The 
Pawn, make sure you read John's review first. It's in Page 6 
Issue 2# July August 1987. And please note that 8-bit owners 
MUST have a 1050 drive or compatible as the disk is in 
enhanced density. 

I played The Pawn on an 800XL, not on an ST, The 
graphics are good, but not great. I've seen much better. They 
tend to use monotone colour schemes to enable subtle shading 
effects, but in a lot of scenes, you can't even tell what the 
picture is supposed to be! So what's the point of subtle shading? 

All except a few pictures at the beginning load from side B of 
the disk, hence the disk must be flipped twice every time a new 

64 Page 6 - Issue 32 



ThE 



PAWN 



picture is displayed. This becomes so frustrating, that I always 
played with the graphics off unless I discovered some new 
territory. The graphics aren't necessary to solve the game. On 
the positive side, the scrolling is superb. It is so smooth and 
easily controlled that not even an ST could do better. 

The plot is devised by a philosophy student - and it shows. 
(If you've ever known a philosophy student, you'll know what I 
mean.) Most reviewers comment on the game's sense of 
humour. It does have a few very funny spots, but the "sense of 
humour" is more because of the bizarre and unrealistic events - 
somewhat like Monty Python. Some of it is just plain old bad 
taste (such as the gratuitous violence, use of alcohol, marijuana 
and Satanism). It is also heavily influenced by religion and 
politics, but you'd expect that of a philosophy student. Overall, 
the game feels immature', but I'm sure that will disappear in 
Magnetic Scrolls' future releases. 

The area where The Pawn receives my greatest criticism is 
the parser. An Adventure parser falls within the area ol 
Artificial Intelligence known as Natural Language Processing. 
A Natural Language Processor essentially consists of three 
phases - lexical analysis, syntactic analysis and semantic- 
analysis. In simple terms, lexical analysis is where the input 
string typed by the user is broken down into separate words and 
checked to make sure they are in the program's vocabulary. 
Syntactic analysis is where the program makes sure that the 
words arc arranged in a grammatically valid way. Semantic 
analysis makes sure that the combination of words makes sense. 
Then and only then should the program act upon the user's 
input. 

The Pawn's lexical analysis is reasonably good except that the 
f.ir.iii- of verbs is ;i bit limited The syntactic analysis sifters by 
allowing some extremely complex constructs to the detriment of 
the simple and more commonly used constructs. The player's 
efforts to communicate with the program sometimes turn into a 
frustrating session of trial and error. 

The game's biggest shortcoming however is the semantic 
analysis and the resultant command processing. It often 
produces nonsense replies, grammatical errors, misleading 
statements, logical inconsistencies and downright mistakes. In 
other words, it's full of bugs! So beware! 

HINTS 

When playing The Pawn, there are a few general hints I can 
offer to make the game as painless as possible. Firstly, 



{jam/ Francis* 







remember ihuL you have five senses, EXAMINE, FEEL, 
SMELL, TASTE and LISTEN TO every object you find and 
every noun in room descriptions. You will usually get a sensible 
response which bares little or no relevance to the game. It is the 
odd occasions that it DOES bare some relevance that you will 
be thankful for this advice. Also try LOOK IN, LOOK 
UNDER, SEARCH, READ, PUSH and PULL when they 
seem appropriate . 

Ask all the characters about all the other characters. This is 
the best way to build up a picture of a character's personality, 
but also helps you to determine who can or cannot be trusted. 
Any other conversation is pretty limited. The program tries to 
be clever when conversing with characters, but usually ends up 
making a foo] of itself. 

Kronos will appear very early in the game and give you a 
small task to do. Don't leave it at that. Prod him and probe him 
and ask all sorts of questions, but whatever you do, don't let 
him leave (as I did} until he's also given you a major task. You 
cannot finish the game otherwise. 

Save the game before giving objects away, for if your 
generosity does not achieve the effect you desire, the object is 
gone forever. 

You cannot use the blue key twice! Think about it. Which use 
gives you the most points? 

As John Sweeney pointed out in his review, the game does 
not appear to have a clear conclusion. It simply fizzles out. The 
aim is to achieve the full 350 points which are awarded as 
follows (the descriptions arc intentionally vague and in no 
particular order : 



Tfc PAWN 



Getting the note 5 

Entering the toolshed 5 

Making the plant happy 3 
Completing Kronos' first 

task 5 

Reaching the narrow track 5 

Getting the pouch "5 

Getting ihe coin t 

Getting the black potion 5 

Moving the boulder 10 
Stopping the Gum from 

laughing 10 

Completing the Guru's task 10 

Getting the blue key 10 

Entering the staircase room 10 

Reaching the rockface 10 



Getting the ballot paper 10 

Feeding the alchemists 10 

Satisfying Jerry Lee Lewis 10 
Completing Kronos' second 

task * J 5 

Getting the rope 1 5 

Defeating the snowman 1 5 
Reaching the ledge 1 5 

Satisfying the porter 15 

Getting rid of the 

alchemists 20 

Entering Kronos 1 workshop 20 
Eliminating Kronos . 25 
Voting for the right 

candidate 30 

Completing the Devil's task 50 



Total 



350 



Well t that just about wraps it up for The Pawn (except for 
the dozens of bugs). If you're still having trouble, refer to the 
coded hints accompanying this column. Please note that they 
are a lot more explicit than usual because of the game's 
difficulty, 

NEXT ISSUE 

Next issue I'll be covering Lapis Philosophorumj Stranded 
and (depending on space) maybe one or two others as well, See 
you then, 

Garry Francis t 26 Baringa Road, Karl wood, 
N.S-W,2206, Australia 



1. Can'l rimiiir the filler wristband? 

107 ■>! i mm i 

2. Cwa*1 nm the dotted red Line? 
71 17 

I. Cut buy anything from Honest John? 

k :«'H 117 

4. *Iun't enter the fnnlshed? 

!-. li.ll II 

5 - Orn't mnv-e the whcclba trow? 

HtljLl 

*- Can't plant the pot plant? 
122 41 55 « W41 55 33 55 41 « 2-\ 
T. Can't get pan the guards? 

tiH Mb 

5. Can't sto p the Guru laughing? 
1029 29 114 

V. t!;in"t upen the Guru'* cuphciiird. 

HI. tja.n'1 net past the hciulder? 
hi bl 7b 119 HW :<l IN V] fill 2 JO 61 
I I . ( :a.n - t gel past the rnckr.il]? 
M J 
12- ('■.n't survive the cola*? 

in hi 

1 1- < ian't pick up the snow? 

1=: b=i 

14. Can't gel pn*t the snowman? 

XI 21 

I i. Still ean'i get pun the snowman? 

in 1202923 

I'., t.nn'1 *.-]' in h the icy ramp? 

115 5*6 

I*. Can't dpi.ll (hi- duor mi iti* iiimliriL- in 
tht k£ lower? 

4S KU ] ] 

IK, Can't get the Prjmeevx flhul nF Ihe ice 

tower? 

w.'Kgi ti2>f4 1<>25<JI ]iJ*S» 

19, Can's open the wooden door in the 
tret? 

41 100 1 1 

20, Cant remove the wooden boards in 
ihe tree trunk room? 

105 » 

21, Cu't And a uh Tor the ballot bWMft 
Ml 

II. Can't open the sure? 
li-: II 

23. Can't enter the J UV? 

13 II T0 02UI «3o 

2-}. (Jan'lxel Ihe lumps? 

41 24 

25. tlaij'l trail the luvu? 

iKIOjutl K4B" 16 H 121 

2b. Can't gc [ out or the maze : 

4411 

21, Can't get past ihe uk-hem in»? 

68 49 91 68 71! 

it. Can't open ihe lumei? 

15 52 6*57 



19. t Lan'i get pp*t the paper null? 

till 25 77 75 

tO. Can't descend safely from the paper 

wall? 

6264 11174 31 13 To K4 5 

ill iin't npen the double dwn? 

h n 666 

J2. Can't jcet pa*i i hi- pa rm r 

M32 

13- Can't tec the rrlrvaiiee «l~ jerry l,ee 

l^wl*? 

14 32 

34. Can't tee whu'i in the fridge? 

122 5 21 1 1 17b HP 199 

IS. Can't get pa.it the Jrancin? 

«7 23 4? 7 4| 4 4) 7 

36. Can't survive even a tingle move in 

krcinos.' wiirltshcip? 
21 I 12 II-' 

J"'. Can't kill kruinn.: 
27 17 Id 11 72: 

it, (jn'i get p»st the dragon on the 

return I rip? 

Ill 7K 

W. Can't enter the cream doom? 

*7 9 7b 6 

40. Ctori e^cjipe the brilliant void? 
8640 

41-Mitsingiehit? 

38 33 IS 

41. Miuing a enin? 

IK 22 12 J3M 

43. Mls&lne. a metal key? 
a S I Jn 

44. Mi shins n pol plant? 
iS 22 fo» 

45. Mi**ixu{ a travel? 
SOW 

J" Mtaaiug n ehem ? 
107 95 109983 H no 
41. Mining ■ blue Ley? 
if) 22 7" 

4K, Mining a wooden key? 
5H22 17 

4?. Mining a 1 ight tnurce? 
V' 111] 01 

5(1. Still miMinn m light snurce? 
14 !«2u lltf-fcbK Jtl KH <ll Ml ¥4 
51, Still missing a light khj rte? 
■IS 5 7(1 19 7* Hi) 

53. IVHsainjc »■ ballcn paper? 
58 ^H2 

5 1. Mikhi cyf a s*fe? 
38 22 W 

54. Missinjr a hard hat? 

la ii 9i 

55. Miivinpr a black potion? 

1U7 in j nw i ifi*i t» i)4« 



1 CHARACTERS 


32 THIRSTY 


63 TEAR 


<n or 


2 BOULDER 


33 IN 


64 ROPE 


■J 1 ) LOUNGE 


3IT 


34.HES 


65 CONTAINER 


96 SPIKY 


4 POINT 


15 BREAK 


Mi ON 


V7 SHINE 


VRED 


in IXH1R 


67 REMOVE 


OS EVERYTHING 


t> KXOCK 


37 SIGN 


6fi GIVE 


*J9 LATER 


7 SHAPES 


3H LOOK 


W BENCH 


100 WOODEN 


8 BOOTS 


» BOWL 


70 LUMPS 


101 GURU 


9 WRISTBAND 


WRIGHT 


71 MAZE 


102 COVER 


10 TO 


41 POT 


72 HIM 


103 DEVIL 


1 1 KEY 


42 DEATH 


73 READ 


104 METAL 


12 CUSHION' 


43 AT 


74 HOOK 


105 CLOSE 


1 J CUPBOARD 


44 EXIT 


75 SHARP 


HNjGO 


14 FILL 


45 USE 


7GAND 


107 ASK 


15 CAST 


4fi FIRST 


77 SOMETHING 


]0fi TOGETHER 


16 BOTTLE 


47 POTION 


7« DISGUISE 


3 TO ABOUT 


17 MAT 


4SMIX 


n PEDESTAL 


ill) SNOW 


18 FOUNTAIN 


49 RICE 


80 EXAMINE 


11] VOTE 


l l > GREEN 


50 MELT 


61 FEEL 


U 2 ADVENTURER 


20 CHIT 


51 OTHER 


82 SAFE 


1 1 3 YOU 


31 Rill 


52 SPELL 


H3 AFTER 


114 SHIRT 


22 LXIIHR 


53 PRESS 


M CLIME 


115 WEAR 


23WH1TH 


54 STUMP 


K=! TAKING 


116 NOTE 


24TkOWHl. 


55 PLANT 


S*THATS 


liTCOIN 


25 BED 


5(i 1 >PEN 


87 SHAFT 


118 LIFE 


26 POCKET 


57 THEM 


188 EAST 


1 1 9 RAKE 


27 THROW 


SSPULL 


89 Hi.UE 


120 SNOWMAN 


28 WINDOW 


59 LISTEN 


t0 DROP 


121 WALL 


2i»WITH 


60 LEVER 


91 THEN 


122 TAKE 


iORLti 


nl HOE 


92U r AtT 




J] BUTTON 


!>2 TIE 


93 KRONOS 





Pagic 6- Issue 12 



65 





EXPANDING YOUR ATARI 



In this first article of a new series 

Mark Fowlis takes a general look at 

the various ways you can expand your 

Atari 400 800, XL or XE 



If you are at all interested in the hardware side of computing 
you will, no doubt have looked through the multitude of 
computer interfaces, expansion modules and gadgets available 
at local computer stores. If I were to ask you which computer is 
the best for adding on these bits and pieces , which would you 
say? The BBC? Spectrum? Commodore? 

Wrong on all counts! The Atari beats them all hands down 
with its Parallel Bus Interface (the rear port connector to us 
mere mortals), a cartridge port which can also be used or 
expansion, two (or in some cases four) joystick ports, which can 
be rcprogrammed as outputs or inputs, and a serial port. 

Why then, if the Atari is so great for expansions, are there 
such a a small number of Atari add-ons and why are those that 
are available so expensive? Well, there are several reasons 
behind this. Many of the other computers lack the features 
already in the Atari and need these extra add-ons to even 
compete, but a more significant reason is that Atari Inc. has 
always taken years to release any hardware details to the public 
and, as a result, there are hardly any expansions made for the 
Atari. The manufacturers can charge higher prices as there is 
little compel ition. 

DO IT YOURSELF 

For those owners who want to add something to their Atari, 
help is now at hand in the shape of this series of articles, which 
will teach you how to build your own add-ons at a fraction of 
the cost of ready-made units in the shops. This first article will 
take an overall look at the various expansion possibilities and 
later articles will go on to discuss specific projects. 

If you are seriously considering expanding your Atari you 
will need several essential tools. These are a low power 
soldering iron suitable for electronics, some solder, wirecutters 
and metal tweezers or snipe-nose pliers. A multimeter and/or a 



*5W 

• 



t" CHE 



EM LED 



-+-PROBE <TE5T POIMTJ 



i F»* RETf LEO 

±s«n 



logic probe is also invaluable. For those of you who don't have a 
logic probe an extremely simple circuit is provided in Figure I. 
This will when connected tell you if the point probe is touching 
at logic level 1 (i.e. -t-5V), or logic (i.e. 0V). These are the two 
basic voltages within the circuitry of most computers, except for 
power supplies and video circuits which do not concern us 
anyway. Hence for interfacing we will be using TTL 
(transistor-transistor logic) chips as these handle the correct 
levels. 

Let's now take a look at each of the ports available to us. 

THE JOYSTICK PORTS 

These are the most widely known expansion ports on the 
Atari. The connections of these ports are shown in Figure 2. 
Pins 1-4 and 6 are normally at +5V level, and these are 
connected by a switch to Ov when the joystick is pushed in a 
direction - see Figure 3. With five push-to-make switches you 
can easily make an arcade- type joystick. 

The PIA (or joystick) bits provide the input to one (or two in 
400 800 models) 6520 PIA chip(s) read by the computer. The 
PIA (Peripheral Interface Adapter) can re -configure these lines 
to be either input (as normal) or output depending on the 
direction control register' in the chip, We can control this quite 
simply. Figure 4 shows the bit use of the control rcgister(s). 

The important bits are 2 and 3. Bit ^ you have probably come 
across before in POKE 54018 with 52 or 60 to switch the 
cassette motor on and off. Bit 2 controls the use of the data 
register. If bit 2 is high (set to 1) then any data written to the 
data register goes to the output and data on the inputs can be 
read from the data register. If bit 2 is low (set toO) then the data 
register gives access to the port direction control register. For 
each bit (which represents an input output line), the level 
determines the direction. If we put a in bit 5 then line 5 will 



1 5 TICK FQBWftMU 

2 STICK BACK 

2 STICK LEFT P-Tfl BJtl 

4 MICK RIGHT 1-4 

5, I'iii li INPUT 

I. I R M.I.I H 

7 <S» 

a ev 

9 POT a TMHUT 



1 ± 3 * B 



6 7 8 » 



■» IIH -D-TVPE* 

rCIHH! LltlR 

(Ult l-ltO LOOKING 
rtl PUftTJ 



15: » 

'd ■( 4 -11 B 
B J " j | T 



t IRC 



PIH 8 



Figure 1 - Logic Probe 



Figure 2 - Joystick Ports 



Figure i -Joystick Circuit 



!■■:■ 



| J aj;c t> - ]&*iie 32 



be tin output. Conversely putting a 1 in a bit. makes it an input. 
Bit 2 is then set back to 1 so that data can be read and written to 
the data register. Lucky 4O0/8C1O owners have two sets of these 
and can have 16 controllable lines. In the 60O/8OOXL and 
IWXE the second PI A is used for memory control and 
management. 

If wc wish to use the port as an output we wiJJ need so kind of 
driver circuit as the outputs can only handle a small load. 
Figure 5 shows some typical driver circuits for various loads. 

The limitation of the joystick ports is that they only have 10 
lines for digital data, if wc include the two trigger lines which 
are always inputs. We can therefore only have expansions using 
a limited number of connections. We could drive the lines to act 
as a serial interface for us, but this is a lot of work, mostly in 
writing the software, although it can be very effective. 

Some sort of program must, however, be loaded in to operate 
any joystick port driven interface and as this program resides 
somewhere in memory, may be written over or ignored by other 
programs. As a result, you cannot guarantee that your interface 
will work with all commercial software {despite the claims of 
certain manufacturers!), and obviously you cannot use joysticks 
as well! 

The joystick ports are also designed to accept light-pen input. 
These connect into port 2 (or 4 on the 400:800). Unlike other 
computers, the light pen circuitry can be really simple as all we 
need is a light sensitive switch to connect the trigger line to 0V 
when the electron beam of the television screen passes it. As the 
beam scans the screen rapidly we need a fairly fast device. Many 
designs have been produced before so I shall refrain from yet 
another light pen circuit unless there is a demand for one. The 
light pen X and Y screen positions are provided by the Atari in 
memory locations 564 and 565. 

The potentiometer inputs A and B are normally used for the 
paddle controllers if you have any, however they can be used to 
read the position of other variable resistors (potentiometers), sec 
Figure 6. This could be useful in many applications such as 
position sensing in robots, graphic input devices, paddles, etc. 

The values are read from the following locations: 

Port 1 - POT. A- 53760 (SD20G) 

-POT. B- 53761 
Port 2 - POT. A - 53762 

- POT. B- 53763 (SD203) 

The 400/800 computers have yet another four inputs 
(53764-53767). 

We can use smaller value potentiometers if we connect a 
capacitor from the potentiometer input line to 0V. This slows 
down the charging of the internal conversion capacitor, making 
the computer think the resistance of the external potentiometer 
is larger. This is a case nf trial and error for individual 
potentiometers and is only useful if you MUST use one with a 
smaller value. 

If the reading of the pot inputs is being done in machine code 
we may require some other locations: 

ALLPOT - 53768 CJD208) gives the status of the 
converters, I bit representing 1 converter. A bit set to I 
means that the value of that input is valid. 
POTGO - 5377 1 (SD20B) starts the conversion process 
on the inputs. 

Also of interest is bit 2 of location 53775 (SD20F) which 
when set to 1 enables fast scanning of the inputs. This fast 



Bit Function 




7 
6 
5 

4 


irq Status (Read) 

O 

l 
l 




3 


cassette Motor Control 






2 
1 

e 


Pia data register select 
O 

IRQ Enable (Urite) 










I/O 

Direction control 



Figure 4 - PIA Control Register 



+^U/+12U 



1N4148- 



RELAY 



111 



I/P 1N4148 L^ 

o— ^W i\ t T ucioa 



ji4 . 7Kfi 
-I "1 



OU 



LOGIC DRIVER CIRCUIT 



IK 



1 l\2 

I/P Q ■ ; • O O/P 




H 7407 



•ev 



Figure S - Output Driver Circuits 



♦ SU 



IT I *|j 

p_4 



POT | *■%.! Mil LINEAR 
I/P 



I 



rCflPACITOR 



OU 



J 



Figure * - Potentiometer Connections 



Page 6 - Issue 32 67 



scanning is in 2 TV scan lines (128uS) but is not as accurate as 
the normal scan, 

A final note on the joystick ports - the +5V supply is not 
intended for heavy loads or lots of circuitry. Anything more 
than a few logic gates should have its own power supply, 

MONITOR OUTPUT 
(XL/XE models only) 

This provides the composite video output to a monitor. Note 
that TTL monitors will NOT work! The pin connections are 
shown in Figure 7. 

The audio output is around 0,75V peafc-peak which is a little 
too high for Hi-Fi AUX' inputs which want around l50mV 
pk-pk- We can step down the voltage using a potential divider - 
see Figure R. Now you should be able to have Hi-Fi sound from 
your Atari] Check the input levels 10 your Hi-Fi ftnt though, 
Rl may need to be larger if the input level is less than 150mV. 



THE SERIAL PORT 

This is pretty difficult to use unless you intend using a 
computer at the other end to decode the signals and send the 
appropriate reply codes. As you can daisy chain a number of 
devices, each data message ha? a device address encoded and the 
destination must acknowledge each frame from the computer. 
Personally I would not advise expanding via the serial port as it 
is too complex and not particularly fast. Also any driving 
software must handle the device by the standard SIO calls. For 
the interested, the pin connections are in Figure 9 and a good 
description of the operation can be found in the 400,800 
refetence manual available from Atari. 



THE CARTRIDGE PORT 

Although predominantly used for ROiW cartridges, the 
cartridge port is an extremely useful expansion port giving us a 
16K block of memory for registers and I/O. The pin assignment 
is shown in Figure 10 and includes: 



1, Conposite LUHinance 

2 . OM 

3, audio output 

a. Conposit? Video 
5 . not used 




Figure 7 - Monitor Output (XL. XE only) 



Pin 3 



*3 0Kfi 



Pin 2 * \i; 



n Hi-Fi 'Al 
; 
•! Ground 



Hi-Fi 'AUK' Input 
pk-pk 



Figure 8 - Hi-Fi input from monitor output 



1 CLOCK OUTPUT 

2 GROUND 

3 GROUND 

4 MOTOR CONTROL 
6 +5V^R£RI>V 

6 HOT CONNECTED 

7 CLOCK INPUT -OPTIONAL 

8 DATA INPUT » 
3 DATA OUTPUT 

10 COMMAND 

11 PROCEED 

12 AUDIO INPUT* 

13 INTERRUPT * 



1 2 3 4 S 6 



zz 



A 



7 8 9 ID 1 12 I 
11 13 



13 WAV LARGE 
D-COHNCCTOR 



*-INPUT 



Figure 9 - The Serial Port 



* Address lines A0 to A 12 (SK coverage) 

* Data Bus [D O to D 7) 

* R'f - Read /Write 

* S4 - Right slot ROM select line. (S8000 - (QpFF). 
•"ST - Left slot ROm select line. (SAQO0 - JBFFF). 

* RD4 - Right ROM present, { + 5V if it is) 

* RD5 - Left ROM present. ( + 5 V if it is) 

* 02- Syst em clock. 

* CCTNL' - ROM Hank Control select line: driven by any 
R/W to SD5000 to SD5FF. Used to select 1 of 2 ROMS in 
the area selected. (Supercartridges), 

We can fit 32K of ROM into a cartridge and select between 
two hanks of 16K in the available space (58000 to &BFFF). The 
only difference with using the cartridge port is that you must 
use cassette or disk based languages as the cartridge expansion 
will occupy the car[ridge area, hence the Assembler Editor 
cartridge cannot be used! We can however write our programs 
before and convert them to Basic DAT A statements for loading 
by the inbuilt Basic 

To connect to this port you will need a 15 way double sided 
edge card of 0.1 inch spacing contacts to plug into the slot, This 
could then be connected to a card frame for further expansion. 
Alternatively for a chosen application with a small number of 
components a 'cartridge' could be made on a double-sided 
p.c.b. 

To interface to the cartridge port we must, in most cases, 
make use of the right hand slot (i.e. 88000 to S9FFF) as the left 
hand slot (fAjOOQ to SBFFF) is occupied by Basic, If we are 
using a purpose written machine code boot program, however, 
we could use either or both halves. 



THE PARALLEL BUS INTERFACE 
(XL/XE only) 

One of the greatest mysteries of the newest range of Atari 
computers is the rear expansion port. Hardly anyone seems to 
know how La u^e it, and there have been a small number of 
slightly confusing articles. Adverts toOj manage to confuse the 



68 Page 6 - Issue )1 



use of The port. We shall now set history straight (I hope!)- 

The port presents us with the full address bus of the 
computer AO to A15, allowing observation of any memory 
location - see Figure 1 1 , The data bus is also present. 
Read Write and the system clock are provided too. Where this 
port really starts to differ is in the extra useful lines .... 

CAS - Column Address Strobe, output for RAM 

addressing, 

RAS - Row Address Strobe, output for the same. 

AUDIO - Audio input allowing you to have sound feeding 

through your T.V., 'monitor speaker. 

RESET - Output, to reset any expansions on power-up etc. 

KHFRESH - Refresh timing output. 

MPD - Math Pack Disable Input. Disables Floating point 

ROM (SD800 to SDFFF) for parallel bus interfaces. 

IRQ - Interrupt request input. 

READY - Ready input. L'scd tor slow memory devices. 

EXTEND - Kxteraal decoder output for FBI devices. If you 

want to use the expansion for callable devices such as disk 

drives then you need this, 

EXTSEL - Input to disable internal RAM, to allow input 

This is VERY useful ... 





S4 




* R04 


1 A 




A3 


2 B 


SO 




A2 


3 C 


A4 




Al 


4 D 


AS 




ae 


6 E 


A6 




t>4 


e r 


A7 




OS 


7 Hi 


A8 


EI 


Lftft 02 


e j 


A9 FROHT 




01 
DS 


9 K 

10 L 


A12 Top on 

13 0KE 
03 




DC 


11 M 


07 




5F 


12 M 


All 




*5M 


13 P 


Aie 




P»5 » 


14 R 

J.5 S 


R/M 

CtK? C871 


cChT L 






*=i*ipiit 





Figure 10 -The Cartridge Port 



Note that there is NO way of disabling the operating system 
from the port. Some recent expansion units claim to be 
expandable to allow multiple Operating Systems via the rear 
port, however these will need internal modification of the host 
computer thus invalidating your guarantee. 

There are two ways of using the parallel bus interface. 
Firstly, as Atari intended, it may be used as a device. This could 
then be handled by the standard calls such as LIST "P:" etc. 
However this requires a 2K device handler ROM to overlay the 
floating point ROM. It might just be a little over the top if we 
want a simple I/O port and don't really want to spend time 
programming 2K ROM's and writing device handlers! 
Secondly, you can use it, as it probably will be used in nearly all 
eases, as a powerful expansion port. 

130XE owners may well be getting worried by now. Where is 
the massive expansion port I am talking about? Apparently 
Atari were not too happy that very few products had been 
released to use the rear port on the oOU/SOQXLj so they 
simplified it to a 'cartridge port expander'. Not one ofthe 
cleverest moves tor, as in the cartridge port, you cannot use a 
cartridge and a rear port expansion! So for 130XE owners, the 
same rulei, apply as for the cartridge port, 

COMING NEXT 

That's the overview of the expansion possibilities, I hope that 
it has whetted your appetite, Next issue I'll be revealing the 
details ofthe 130XE cartridge port expander (the equivalent of 
the rear expansion part) as well as the 400,'SOO rear expansion 
bus (Atari's biggest secret!). Also I'll be showing how to use the 
rear expansion port to connect to a multitude of projects. 



WARNING: Unless you are absolutely sure you hnovi what you 
an doing it is possible to damage your computer when attaching 
any expansion circuits. Neither the author nor PAGE 6 can accept 

any responsibility for any damage resulting from any project 
undertaken as the result of suggestions made in this series. t 



BV 








l 


2 


* EHTSEL 


ae 


3 


4 


Al 


A2 


5 


ft 


A3 


A4 


7 


ft 


AS 


A6 


9 


to 


■V 


A7 


11 


1Z 


ae 


A* 


11 


14 


aie 


All 


19 


16 


A12 


A13 


17 


19 


A14 


nu 


1? 


20 


A15 


oe 


21 


22 


Ol 


D2 


23 


24 


D3 


04 


25 


20 


B5 


TOP 06 


27 


26 


07 BOTTOM 


mv 


29 


30 


eu 


CLK2 (02) 


31 
33 


32 
34 


eu 


R5T 


IRQ * 


3S 


36 


* RDV 


■ * 
* * 


37 
3* 


30 
40 


EKTENB 


REFRESH 


CAS 

MPD « 

eu 


41 
43 

45 


42 

44 
40 


BV 


RAS 


REAO/HRTTE 




47 


40 


■ • 


AUDIO * 


4? 


SO 


eu 


« = Input: 
, .= Reserved 


— 


S P 


in is active low 



Figure 1 1 - The Rear Expansion Port (600 SOOXL) 



Pajre 6 - Issue 3 2 ft* 




10-PRINT 

XLENT Software 

£14.95 



For many years 1029 printer owners have been crying out for 
a useful utility to use with their neglected" peripheral. Support 
for it now comes from XLENT software, in what they describe 
as THE ULTIMATE UTILITY FOR THE 1029 
PRINTER', 10- Print comes as a double-sided disk, with 
several fonts and accessory programs and a small, but 
interesting^ manual. The disk itself had a minor 'defect' in the 
fact that it only has DOS 2.0 and not the more commonly used 
DOS 2.5. 

A NEW DEVICE HANDLER 

On loading, IG-Print installs a device, Q:„ into the handler 
address table, and then loads the rest of the program into page 
24 of memory. The big downfall of this is that when DOS is 
called, DUP.SYS automatically overwrites the Q: handler and 
the only way of getting it back is to re-boot. As 10-Print appears 
to only occupy IK. of memory, I cannot understand why the 
author couldn't have bumped up MEMLO a little, to 
accommodate both DOS and the Q: handler. A solution to this 
fault can be obtained by using the CL'STOM.BAS program 
that is on the disk. This gives the user the chance to relocate the 
program anywhere in memory, 

IN USE 

To the user who just wants a hard copy of a program listing, 
10-Print operates in exactly the same way as the LIST "P:" 
command, except that you use Q: instead. The normal printer 
output using this manner is 60 characters per line, but by using 
LIST "Q2:" the printer lists in 38 characters per line, as in a 
default GRAPHICS screen. The devices Ql: and Q4: also 
exist, these modes print in the same way as Ql: and Q2: except 
that characters are 8 lines high, so as to reproduce characters as 
shown on screen, but these modes take two passes to complete 
each line and so take twice as Icing to complete the listing. The 
actual output to the printer deserves a good comment as 
10-Print does not use the 1029s built in character set, but the 
one that the computer is using at the time of printing! 

Programs using the Q: handler can be easily written in 
BASIC, as the handler is compatible with all the usual OPEN, 
PRINT # and PUT # commands, and P: can also be OPEN on 
a different channel, enabling the printer's standard font to be 
mixed with the character set that the computer is currently 
using. This is a fantastic feature, that will allow you, by simple 
software control, to print in any style of font that is currently- 
resident in memory. 

Spacing and the number of characters per line can be altered 
by POKEing a memory location, CHRW1D and NUMCHS 
respectively, though Q2: and Q4; will always print 38 characters 
per line. This gives access to narrower characters and with a 
special font that fits into 4 columns per character, it will allow 
120 characters per line. Although some readability is lost by 
doing this, it is ideal for applications such as printing a lot of 
text on labels or for database spreadsheet output. 



Iff) This is Six.iTil 

tu IMS is fc*id*,rnt 

iit ihi> is fsur.fnl 

(si tn>* is bt*ok. nut 

Cijl Thii >s iquin.fnt 

<M This lk ttiri.fnt 

tT) this is standard 1629 

fB^.Thi* is iUndfd 1 623 utidtrtiiwa 

<3> Th±» ia. 1023 doubt* 



^»i 



taaa d^fat* 



width 



'^■md* r- 1 JTij-eJ 



Thfif mrm Xhm 11 nod** used bW FILBPBNT . BA3 , 



Reviewed by Phil Car dwell 
APPLICATIONS 

10-Print appears to be a stand alone utility for rhc 1029, in 
the way of providing better quality listings, but as it is an 
AUTO RUN. SYS file, how can it be used with a word 
processor that also auto boots? After a short consultation with 
the manual, I discovered that if a word processor file is printed 
to disk, as it would appear on paper with indentations, margins 
etc, there is a program called FILEPRNT on the disk which 
allows WP files to be printed The program does not work 
properly as it is and requires some "cosmetic' programming, 
which the vast majority of users should get round with ease. 
Once it has been set to the users requirements, FILEPRNT 
will automatically select different fonts to be printed within the 
document currently being processed, providing that you have 
embedded 3 special font selection codes within your text. 

Another program on the disk, TYPESET, gives limited 
compatibility with TYPESETTER hies. Limited because it 
only allows part of a TYPESETTER file to be printed. 
Advanced programmers should be able to come up with a 
routine to print the whole file. 

Ry studying the BASIC programs included on the disk, 
practically anyone can be capable of writing a routine to suit 
their problem. People who follow this advice will notice that the 
GRAPHICS H screen dump and TYPESET programs, don't 
even need the Q: handler to be resident in memory! 

CONCLUSIONS 

K)-Print, despite the occasional minor 'bug', is a very flexible 
and powerful utility, which many 1029 owners should have 
installed before any programming session. It's main value lies in 
it's capabilities to produce listings that contain control, graphic 
and inverse characters, but it is extremely useful for enhancing 
the appearance of any text based output. 

It may not be the 'ultimate 1029 utility" but it is possibly the 
only one that can contend for the title and is well worth 
considering, if you want to improve the appearance of different 
forms of textual output on your 1029. 



-n 



P*ge 6 - Issue 32 



YOUR CHANCE 




TO GET THE 
GAMES THEY 

BANNED! 



'j\ sup er 



„***.*-*?: 



, cutch^ e 



It 



i*** 



fc*A.ft* 



a, 



'Red Rat 
have found 
the magic 
formula' 



/■ ; » 






You may not find these 
easy to get hold of 
so send to PAGE 6 and 
we'll get them to you - 
and at a special price! 



NORMAL PRICE ^£$% s 



nrrrn DDIPC £6.95 each on disk 

Ul LH I III bL £5.95 each on tape 



Send cheque P.O. to PAGE 6, P.O, BOX 
54, STAFFORD, ST16 1DR 
or order by phone quoting Access/ Visa 
number. Telephone 07S5 213928 



BOTH GAMES FOR ATARI XL/XE only on Disk or Cassette 



BUBBLE 
BUBBLE 



There are many occasions when it would be useful to be able 
to sort data into either numerical or alphabetical order. Some 
examples arc Telephone Directories, Kooky Record lists, 
software lists etc. Many such files are held on disk and these are 
uf particular interest as they can be easily manipulated, This 
article will deal with sorting a fiJc into either alphabetical or 
reverse alphabetical order. 

There are two main ways of performing sorts of this kind on 
disk files (which are usually text riles). One is to do operations 
on the file itself, reading it in a couple of lines at a time say, 
performing an operation, writing the results to another file, and 
repeating the procedure over and over but this involves a lot of 
disk operations. One alternative would be to use a RA.MDISK, 
where the text files could be stored. This increases the speed 
considerably and, obviously, eliminates disk operation but, 
despite this, the method is cumbersome and clumsy involving 
multiple opening and closing of files and only allowing 
sequential indexing of data. 

SORT IN MEMORY FOR SPEED 

The method I will use involves copying the source file into 
memory, in this case into an array, and sorting the data in the 
array. Finally, the resultant sorted array ean.be saved to an 
object file, 

Before going on I had better explain some terms before I lose 
anyone. The source file is the original unsorted file which you 
wish to sort and the object rile will be the rile AFTER it has 
been sorted, A text file is a file which consists of characters 
usually produced by a word processor or text editor etc and 
which can be loaded using either the INPUT or GET 
commands, depending on the format. 

The source file need not be a word -processor tile If you are, 
for example, writing a software list program, you may save your 
file directly to disk using either PUT or PRINT- These files 
can just as easily be sorted using the methods I describe below. 

SORTING WORD PROCESSED TEXT 

Firstly, we must read the tile into the array. The program 
required is shown in Listing 1, Line 10 dimensions the array 
FILES to hold 10000 characters. This may not be enough or it 
may be too much for your needs so alter it as you like. 10000 is, 
however, a good round number to be getting on with. The 
source text file may have been saved with either PRINT or 
PUT. The program deals with this, and reads the data into the 
string FILES- This may take a while. The program is fairly 
unique in that it can sort just part of a text file so that lists 
forming part of a document can be sorted. This facility is often 
missing from many commercial word processors. 

It is important that you mark the beginning and end of the 
data that you wish to be sorted. Mark the beginning with a 'S' 





Gordon Cameron presents a 
tutorial on bubble sorting with 
a unique program that allows 
you to sort lists within word 
processing files 






symbol followed by RETURN on a separate line. Mark the end 
of the data with the 'up arrow 1 symbol, again on a line by itself. 
The data in between these two markers will be the data that is 
manipulated and sorted. Anything before is stored in 
GARBSTS, and anything after In" GARBKNDS. This facility is 
provided as many word processors (e.g. Superscript, Mini 
Office II) add their own control characters to the beginning 
and/or end of your actual text, Using this method we retain 
these special codes but they are obviously not to be sorted. 
They are rewritten to the object file at the end of the session, so 
that the object rile will load back in to the word processor. 

This feature is very valuable as it means you can use a word 
processor to enter data, the program here to sort the data } and 
the word processor thereafter to inspect and adjust again if 
necessary. The above feature is also useful if you only want to 
sort PART of a file. Simply position the markers round the part 
you want sorted, and the program will handle the rest. Again, 
you can alter the sizes of GARBSTS and GARBENDS at will. 

The text to be sorted is stored sequentially in the array, with 
each screen line of the file occupying 40 spaces in the array. 
Note this limitation which means that data longer than 40 
characters cannot be sorted by this program. Once we have the 
data from the file in memory we can access any line at will but 
how do we sort this data ? 

DIFFERENT TYPES OF SORT 

There are several sorting algorithms but the most common 
are the Bubble sort, Shell sort and the Quick sort. For this 
article I will look at the easiest of the three, the Bubble sort. 

The best way to explain the sort is by way of a simple 
example. Only 6 "lines' of data will be used but the method can 
obviously be extended to much larger files. Listing 2 will son 
your data. This program should be used m conjunction with the 
loader given in Listing I . 

The data in our example is a list of software titles as follows: 

Line 1 - Kennedy Approach 

Line 2 - Pawn 

Line 3 - Star Raiders 

Line 4 - Phantom 

Line 5 - Summer Games 

Line 6 -Decathlon 



11 Fa(te * - Issue 32 



CVI 

£ 



PH 1888 REM WKM M WM W WW WW W W MMMWM H K W WK MII M H M 

BD IBlfl REH « BUBBLE SORT NODULE * 
ZO 1820 REH * by * 

pi 1030 reh * Gordon cimtrsn * 

IV 1B40 REM * * 

PF 18SB REH * PACE B MAGAZINE - ENCLAHD* 

no 1000 rem ww w wt cw Hw u w M M Hic M M ii n i mnK ww wmm 

IS 1*61 REH 

FZ 1065 DIM L3NE15(40) ,LIHEZ$(4B) 

VM 1070 ? "iBubbl* Sort":? :* "CFiarwird 
or fanack Alpha sort ?■■ 

SO M7S OPEN Hl,4 J e t "KS" 

JP 1074 GET H3,KEY:IF KEVOiSC C"F") AMD K 

EYOAUE-I"] THEM 1074 
TB 107S CLOSE H3:ir KEY=ASC E"F") THEN FRM 

ADO l:BACK = ft:? "FORHARIt SORT ..■■: GOTO 2 

BBS 
AE 1000 FRMARD=B:BACK=L:7 "BACKWARDS SORT 

* ." 
HG 1010 REH <HH» CDNHEHCE THE SORT mhw 
PT ZOO* ? If "Total Of "JLXME;" lines to 

sort . . "j 7 

BC 2005 FOR LO0P=LIHE~l TO 1 STEP ~1;)HAF 

FLAG=0 
JI 2010 rOR L0QP2=1 to LOOP 

ci 2BZB print "Pass ":LiNe-LO0Pi"."ji,ooi*a 

RI 2030 LXHEl$^PILE£f CLDOP2-U *4<i + i , L0OP2 

*40J 
OT 2040 LINE2S-FILE$(LoO<P2«4a + l, (LOOPItU 

•18) 
ID Z85B IF FRMARD AND LINE1*> LINE2* THEN 

GDSUB 3808 
BE 206* XF BACK AND LINEi* (LINEZf THEN SB 

SUA 3BSB 
YP Z87B NEXT I OQPJ 

KT 7B00 IF HOT SHAPFLAG THEN 20*5 
CT 2885 PRINT "HO. Of 1U1PS S "JSUAPFLAG 
VL 2090 NEXT LOOP 
IS 2015 ? "SORT FINISHED <":GDia 50B0 

VO 2099 REM mmmm shop two values h um h ick 

KF 3000 SHAPFLAG=5MAPFLflG+l 

MB Mm FILES CCI<1OP2-1>M40 + 1,L0OPS«4«1=L1 

HEX* 

JA 3828 FILEStlOflP7Me*l,<LOOPItl>#«8)-Ll 

NE1* 

MS 383B LTMF1S- LINC2*= M " 

AN IB40 ULIUKN 

£0 500O REH HMWH END OF SORT MRITE 

TO BISK ■H H WK M W MM KM. M K I f 

JN 5B1B ? "WRITING TD DISK ... PLEASE HAIT" 



C 
1 



The bubble sort works through the list checking if the first 
line of data is greater than (in this case, 'higher up' in the 
alphabet) the next line. If it is, it swaps them otherwise it goes 
on to the next item. If a reverse alphabetical son is required 
then we simply check if the first item is LESS than the second 
and again swap them if so. 

This swapping continues down the 'List' of lines and when the 
end is reached the last line will be correct (i.C the last line will 
contain the 'greatest' or highest in the alphabet text sequence). 
The procedure is then repeated with each line being checked 
excluding the last line as it is correct. This is repeated 
continually until all the values are correctly placed. Note that 
the first line is contained in FILES( 1 , 40), the second in 
FILES(4l > HO), the third in FILEJ{81, 120) and mi on so each 
line in the list must consist of a maximum of 40 characters only. 

The Atari can work out with its inbuilt functions whether, for 
example, *Phantorn* > 'Summer Games' or not, so you don't 
have to bother with this. Your Atari dues this part for you. 
Using the above algorithm the data transforms in the following 
way: 

Pass 1 . 1 

Is Kennedy Approach (line 1) > Pawn (line 2)? 

No j so don't swap 



Continued overleaf 



OK 1 REH l emC HHl t M J l M MM K MH K MWHBMM W W H MHi mM 
GL 2 REH » FILE FNTRV PROGRAM * 

ZB 3 RE-M » by * 

fo 4 rem * Cordon ciHtron * 

DZ S REH H •» 

RK 6 REH * PAGE 6 MAGAZINE " ENGLAND * 
00 7 REH m i ltHmCH i m HH It H K HH M IIH K MHHH H H KH H 
NH 9 REH 
AH 18 DIM ULtS C180U8} ,NAMEIN$C14] . KAMFOU 

Tf C14J ,GAR0ST$ tl0OB>,GARDEHD$f 1BBB1 , TE 

H*-f <40) 
PT 15 FILES= GARBSTS="":GAR0END*=""IC0 

UNT1=L:C0UNT2=2 ! HUH=1 ; LXRE=1 ; FLAG=B 
KU 78 GRAPHICS B-. POKE 75Z,l!P0*E 42,0 
JA 23 ? ■'*.": COLOR 100 I PLOT l,Z;DRAHTO 38, 

2I0RAHTO 38,2L:DHAMTQ Jt , 21 : DNAHTD 1,1 
LZ IB POSITION 6,6:? "Please mtur IDUrc* 
* i Itn^M" : POSITION 3,7!? "PlHSi! incl 

110* H B N /t i+iOftO.l Dl : J" [POSITION a,e 
KG 3S INPUT HAHEIHS 
VS 40 POSITION 0,11!? "PI BBS* inttr sou re 

• FilenaHe'-tPOSITION 3,12:? "Please if) 

(ludf idvnt i f irr tv ■ 9 Dl:)" 
UR 45 POSITION 0, 13 i INPUT NAHEOUTl 
LR 50 PLOT 1,1 

0R 108 OEM *M ENTER FILE USING GET ** 
KH 110 TRAP 300 
AQ 120 OPEN »1,4,0,HAMEEN$ 
SH 121 REH ** READ IN START GARBAGE * 
RR 123 EFT ttl,GAROST 
DU 124 GAftHSTSr.C0UHTll=CHR*<GARBST> 1 COUNT 

1= COUNT 1*1 
BT 12V IF fiARBST<>36 THEN 173 
OZ 128 REM ***** REA0 IH FILE TO W KM N K 
NH H HH H H BE 5ORTE0 »■» ' """■ 
LK 127 GET HI, DUMMY t FLAG=1 
CO 1ZB REM *** HUM IS THE POSITION ALONG 

THE LINE - LIHE 14 THE LXHE HO . ***** 
OT 129 POSITION 13,101? "RBBdiHR lint- 1" 
RD 130 GET Bl.CHAR 
HW 13S IF CHBR-*5C«"a"I THEN GARBEND$ t 1 » - 

"*"IiOIO ZOO 
PU 140 XF CHAR-1SS OR NUH=40 THEN 160 
TV 146 FILESf CLINE-L)*4B*NUm=CHRS (CHART : 

NUH=HUM+1 IGOTO 13B 
CV 1BO FTLES ttLINE- IHW4B + HIIM) = C MRS ( 1 551 :H 

Ult=t ;LINC=LXHE+1: POSITION 26,10:? LINE 

:GOTO 138' 
PV 200 REH *** REA0 IH EHB GARBAGE *•* 
RP 21S GET Hi, CHAR 
UK 22B GARBEHDS(C0UNT2]=CHR$CGHAR> : COUNTZ 

=COUNT2+l 
00 23B fiOTO 215 
PP 380 REH *H ALL ERRORS TRAPPED TO HERE 

Wt 
HH JIB IF HOT FLAG THEN * "HHO FILE HARK 

EO TO SORT ! »":EH0 
IF 320 LIHE-LINF-1 

AR 330 REH *** PAD OUT THE LAST LIHE 1(1 
VG 331 REM *** FILL 40 CHARACTERS 
TL SIS LASTLINE=(LINE"11*40+1 
NH 140 LOBP-1 ASTl INF 
KP 35* IF ASC CFI1 EStLOOP, LOOP! J <>1S« THEN 

LO0P=LOOP+ltEOTO ISO 
HH 3t>0 IF IL0OP-LASTLINEXI7 THEN FILES tL 

ASTLIHE + X9I=" "« 
RC 370 REH 
PP IB0 REH ** KOH LAST LIHE CONSISTS OF 4 

8 
HO 3S« REM ** CHARACTERS 
DE 393 REH * PASS CONTROL TD SORTER HODUL 

E 
HK 4BHB REH WN M N K HRITE OUT THE OBJECT ** 

* 
QL 9008 OPEH H2 , f , H A MEO U T S 
LS S01O FOR A=l TO CDUNT1-1 
HH 9OZ0 CHAR=ASC tGARftST$ f A , A) I 
GT 9B38 PUT HZ, CHAR 
BZ S04fl HEHT A 
JA S04S PUT HZ,15S 
PH 9OS0 FOR 0=1 TO LIHE 
UH 9056 C=l 

LZ 9QOB CHAH = ASCtFILE*t€O-HH40*CI> 
HF 9078 PUT U2,CHAR 

GZ 9040 IF CHAR0155 THEN C=C + l:COT0 9888 
CZ 9098 HEKT B 

NR 91O0 FOR 0=1 TO COUHTZ-1 
HZ 9118 CHAR = ASC (GARDENOt C t> , PI > 
GS 91ZB PUT H2.CHAR 
DF 9130 HEKT D 

LH 9200 ? "HFIHISHED (...." 
HG 9210 CLOSE HI i CLOSE 1*2 : POKE 761, Of END 



Page 6 - Issue 11 73 



Pass I. 2 

Is Pawn (line 2) > Star Raiders (line 3)? 

No, so continue 

Pass 1.3 

Is Star Raiders (line V, > Phantom (line 4)> 

YESf So swap. Phantom which was line 4 now becomes line 3 

and Star Raiders becomes line 4 

This continues with Star Raiders being compared with 
Summer Games - no swap occurs. Summer Games is greater 
than Decathlon so a swap occurs and the list after the first pass 
is as follows: 



AFTER 
Line 1 
Line 2 
Line 3 
Line 4 
Line > 
Line 6 



Note that Summer Games has taken its proper position at the 
bottom of the list, as it is the 'highest in the alphabet 1 so in the 
next pasSj we don't need to check this line with the previous one 
as we KNOW thai it is correct- Whereas before we had to make 
5 comparisons ( 1 with 2, 2 with 3, 3 with 4, 4 with -5 and 5 with 
6), next time we need only make 4 comparisons as w? don't 
need to compare with the last line. 

In the next pass, only one swap occurs, that of Decathlon 
with Star Raiders. In pass 3 there is again only one swap - 
Decathlon with Phantom and in pass 4 only one swap again - 
Decathlon with Pawn. In pass 5, Decathlon is swapped with 
Kennedy Approach and this yields the final-SOfted sequence: 



BEFOKH 




Line 1 


Kennedy Approach 


Line 2 


Pawn 


Line 4 


Phantom 


Line 3 


Star Raiders 


Line 6 


Decathlon 


Line 5 


Summer Games 



AT START 




END 


Line 6 


Decathlon 


Line 1 


Line 1 


Kennedy Approach 


Line 2 


Line 2 


Pawn 


Line 3 


Line 4 


Phantom 


Line 4 


Line 3 


Star Raiders 


Line 5 


Line 5 


Summer Games 


Line 6 



And that's the bubble sort for you! 

SIMPLE BUT EFFECTIVE 

The Bubble son is very simple, but it can be very effective , 
however there are drawbacks. Notice that, although Summer 
Games reached its location almost at once. Decathlon took 5 
swaps and all 5 Passes and therefore reached its destination very 
slowly. This demonstrates a possible disadvantage of the 
Bubble Sort - although only one item was out of place, it took 
many swaps to get it to its destination. Imagine the list being 
hundreds of lines long with, say, *AAA* right at the bottom and 
all other lines in sorted order. What a waste! If there were 500 
lines, it would take 499 passes and swaps just to get this line to 
its correct position! 

Although an extreme example, this demonstrates the 
shortcomings of the bubble sort algorithm but there are 
alternatives. In a later article I will show you the Shell son. Bye 
for now! • 



?r , 



EASY 

PLAYER 
MISSILE 
GRAPHICS 



This issue we have a listing showing how easy it is to move 
Player/Missiles using the Tuibo Basic commands MOVE and 
-MOVE. Just type in the listing using TURBO BASIC and 
RUN it. When you hear a beep, type in any message up to 26 
characters long. 

The program uses fairly standard Player Missile Graphics 
which have been explained in several other articles so I will only 
run through the commands used which are unique to TURBO 
BASIC. 

Line 140: "Phis line places zeToes in the player missile area } I 

used 20000 by trial and error to find an area of 2K which was 

not being used and therefore full of zcroes. 

Lines 205-230: This moves the character data from the 

character set in ROM to the player area. The data at the end 

of the program is in AT A SCI I character codes, you have to 

subtract 32 from this because the first character stored in the set 

is SPACE (AT ASCII 32). 

Line 245: Moves player down. 

Line 255: This takes the bottom byte and moves it to the top, 

which allows the player to scroll around the screen - 

Lines 340-380: This uses RE PEAT -UNTIL loops to move 

player 1 from left to right. 

Liness 440-480: I have used WHILE- WEND loops to show the 

difference to REPEAT-UNTIL. In this case either can be 

used, but normsfily one of these would sun the job belter. 

Lines 520-5SS: Gets the characters typed in and places them in 

player 3. I have used an IF-ELSE-ENDIF to show how this 

can be used. 

PROC MOVE: This is an endless loop with all the movements 

for all four players together. These are the only lines you need 

to actually move the players depending on which direction you 

want to go. 

I hope this listing will give you the courage to use 
Player,' Missiles in your Turbo BASJC programs, without 
having to worry about machine code. 



by Roy Goring 



74 Page 6 - Utile 32 




QK 1 REM MKMKKMWMW W MK M K M M K » »»» KM » » »> « 

HH 2 RFM • PLAYER-HIS5.I1E DEMO * 

PA S REM * bV * 

LM 4 REM • ROY GORING * 

DZ 5 REM * -» 

RK 6 REH « PACE « MAGAZINE - ENGLAND * 

DO 7 REM M M H MM H X H H K M M H W K H M H M K M M H M K M ■ M W 

hm a hem 

91 9 

MO lft COM MAIN-PROG 

EH 99 

ZH L68 PRDC INITIALISE 
EZ 118 GRAPHICS 3*16 
OK ISA AHADR=PEEK<1A6J 16 jPHBASEtPMADR* 

256: POKE S4279,PHaDR:f>0KE L86,PHADH 
FO 130 POKE S59,62!PDKE 63177,3 
(IX 140 HOWE 20808, PM0A*E ,204B 
A5 158 FOR A = e TO 3; POKE 53240* A » ■ i HEKT 

A 
LI 160 CHBASE=57344: POKE 7B4 , 2BZ i POKL 7 

B5,98:P0KE 786, 138: POKE 787,26 
UK 170 ENDPRQC 

OH 199 

Oil Zfl* PROC PLAVEO0 

FO 2ftS C = 

LC Zlfl FDR a-a TO IS 

OV 215 READ D : D=D-J2 

VD 228 MOUE CHBA4E+ (D*fl} , PMB A5E *lft50+ 

C J B 
PR 225 c=c»8 
MK ZJO NtKT A 
UK 235 POKE 5 324 3,60 
HR 740 FOR E=l TO 238 
CB 245 -HOUE P MBASE + 1024 , PMBASE + 1824 « 

I, 2S* 
UL 2S0 PAUSE 1 

LF 2S5 MOVE PMBA6E*1?70 , P MB ftSE + 1 B48. , 1 
VM 26 8 HEHT E 
ML 265 FNDPROC 

or 299 

RL 388 PROC PLAYER! 

FR 315 C=H 

JR 31ft FOR A = ft TO 13 

VZ 315 READ D:D=D-32 

OV 32ft HOVE fHBfiSF* £D*8> , PMBAbL H106 ■ 

C,8 
P5 325 C=C + 8 

ML 338 NEKT A 

LO 336 «-a 

I u 14)1 REPEAT 

f>D 345 POKE S3249,XtH=H+l 

UK 358 PAUSE 1 

nB 355 UNTIL 11=255 

LF 360 K=8 

HH 366 REPEAT 

PF sm POKE 53249, HiK=X*l 

WF 375 PAUSE 1 

jh soe until n-tan 

MO 3D5 ENDPROC 

OJ 3*9 

5C 488 PROC PLAYER! 

F5 405 C=B 

KL 41ft FOR A=« TO 14 

Hft 415 HEAD 0:0=0-32 

JE 42ft HOVE CH0A3E*CI>*a) , PM0A5EH552 + 

c,o 
n 429 c=c+a 

HM 430 NEKT A 
AH 435 Kl=255 
KP 440 HHILE H1O0 



CAN YOU WRITE TURBO PROGRAMS? 

Don't forget we will pay £20 for an example of Turbo 
programming. The listing must be short enough to fit on one 
pageant! must use the features that are unique to Turbo Basic, 
You will have more success in getting your listing accepted if 
ytm choose an area of programming which has not already been 
covered. Send your contributions on disk to the Editorial 
address on page 1. 



TO 


445 


POKE 53258, Kl SHUHl-l 




MH 


•■■ 


PAUSE 1 




YH 


456 


HEND 




AE 


468 


K1-25S 




FB 


465 


HHILF H1014B 




TF 


470 


POKE 53258, Ml 5H1=H1-1 




Hfi 


476 


PAUSE 1 




YD 


Ul 


HEND 




HR 
OK 


485 ENDPROC 




499 






51 


588 PROC PLAYERS 




CO 


585 


SOUND 0,1Q,12,15;PAU5E 5:SOUH6 




MR 


sia 


POKE 53251,108:0-0 




ID 


515 


H LABEL1 




EH 


528 


GET »11=»-I2 




CD 


525 


IF D=15S-3Z OR C>287 




GO 


sxa 


GOH LA BEL 2 




KU 


535 


ELSE 




FA 


540 


HOUE CHBA4E»<D*H ,PMBA5E*1B2B+ 




c,a 






PY 


54 S 


c=c+a 




GH 


550 


MID LA BE LI 




YH 


BBS 


EHBtF 




PH 


560 


tt LABEL2 




YH 


565 


FOR E=l TO 238 




00 


570 
,256 


HOUE PMJBASE + *792,PMBASE + 1792' 


1 


HH 


576 


PAU5F 1 




BG 


580 


HOUE PMBASe + llll6 ( PH6A5e+ZB47 J 


1 


EI 


BBS 


HEHT E 




HF 
QL 


590 ENDPROC 










GT 


688 PROC HOUE 




BZ 


a as 


DO 




BK 


aia 


-HOUE PHHASE+1824,PMBASEtlft24 


« 




1 , 2 SB 




LB 


015 


HOUE PMBASE* 127a, PHB0SE*1H48, 


1 


OV 


620 


POKE 53249, H: H=K*± 




CM. 


626 


IF M=255 THEN H=8 




5Z 


538 


POKE S3ZbB,Hl;K] wi i 




ZK 


6SS 


IF N1=B THEN Kl=255 




OJ 


B«flj 
,2B6 


HOUE PMBA5E+179Z,PMBA5E+1792- 


1 


BO 


645 


HOUfc PMBASE*16LD,PHBA5E+Z847 


1 


tB 


66 ft 


LOOP 




HM 


65 5 ENDPROC 












BY 


20 8 


n HAIH-PHfll, 




IN 


2010 


EXEC INITIALISE 




CH 


2828 


EXEC PLAYERS 




£>ft 


ZB30 


EXEC PLAYER1 




(II 


204ft 


EHEC PLAVER2 




EP 


2050 


EXEC PLAYEH3 




KY 


206ft 
2999 


EKEC HOVE 




AG 






7B 


3088 


DATA 84,72,73,03,32,73.03,32,55 


J 




2,83 


. (IB, B2, 73.84,69 




HE 


3818 


DATA (15,70,79,04,72,69,82,32,03 


8 




8,82 


,73,04,69 




PZ 


.< II l II 


DATA 72,69,82.69,32,73,83,32,65 


i 




2 r B4 


,72, 7B, 82, 60 





WHAT IS TURBO BASIC? 

Turbo Basic is a powerful BASIC language for the Atari 
originally published in the German magazine Happy 
Computing who retain the copyright hut have released 
the program to the public domain. It adds over 60 new 
commands to Atari Basic, runs three to five times as 
fast f yet is totally compatible with existing Atari Basic 
programs. It comes with a compiler that will compile 
any Atari Basic or Turbo Basic program to run at 
machine language speed. 

You should be able to get 3 copy from any source of 
Public Domain software such as your local user group 
or the PAGE 6 Accessory Shop, 



Page 6 — [5511c .12 






xv&$fc 




«* 



Vta£ 



■v»w 





*X£^ 



C< 







^*rr 



(ip*!* 



OfllBO 11 



8-BIT GAMES .... 8-BIT GAMES .. .. 8-BIT GAMES 



ENJOY 



inr 



Monstrosities abound in this latest 
release from Red Rat. Originally banned 
along with 'Little Devil', 
NIGHTMARES has reportedly since 
been withdrawn from the main offended 
party's list of ^untouchable' software - 
perhaps their conscience was keeping 
them awake at night? 

It's a shoot 'em up by nature, but just 
for a change there aren't any space-age 
zap-mobiles, Photon missiles or Alien 
Motherships to worry about., This time 
you assume the role of a brave Faerie (not 
a typo!) and as you might have guessed, 
the fate of elf-kind lies entirely in your 
skilful hands. Someone has taken a lot of 
time and effort to write a fantastic plot, 
which doesn't add a great deal to the 
game but makes for some excellent 
reading while you're waiting for it to load 
in! 

1 1 seems that elfin society needs 
protecting from the encroaching darkness 
that threatens to engulf the land. How 
unfortunate that the Faerie King - Lord 



NIGHTMARES 



Motorhod - is away on business and 
unable to drive the evil essences back to 
hell and hence rekindle the magical 
radiance that keeps the Faeries 
perpetually young and happy!! Only you 
can save the day by collecting radiant 
insects called Airrlits and destroying the 
frightening array of hideous Demons, 
Ectoplasm spitting 'Grunts 1 , Ravening 
Werewolves and the ugly 'Monkoids'. No 
piece of cake! Although armed with a 
magic bow and arrow plus an intermittent 
supply of Lightning bombs, the monsters 
are continually in pursuit with only one 
intent - to yap your precious energy 
reserves! They invariably succeed too! If 
you manage to collect the specified quota 
of Airflits, rescue all of the stray faeries 
and eliminate a sufficient number of 
nasties, you must then search for an exit 
door taking you through to the next in the 
series of fifteen action-packed levels. 

As for visual effects, you will be hard 
put to find a better variety of monsters 
than in NIGHTMARES, they really are 



MARES 



a terrific bunch of nasties! You won't have 
to search the screen for a minuscule blob 
like in so many other arcade games - this 
lot are VERY conspicuous filling up as 
much as half of the available screen 
height! The attention to detail is superb, 
and each level features its own 
horizontally scrolling background 
scene iv. Musk and sound effects are v&y 
good too, providing the decisive touch to 
an outstanding overall impression. One 
word of warning: NIGHTMARES 
becomes very challenging, especially on 
the higher levels, so if you haven't got an 
auto-fire joystick I would suggest that you 
acquire one before hand! 

Games of the shoot 'em up genre can 
be boring at the best of times if not 
constructed in a competent manner, but 
Red Rat have found the magic formula to 
produce an entertaining package of the 
highest quality. Be sure to show your 
appreciation! 



Paul Rixon 



Published by Red Rat, £7.95 on cassette - £9.95 on disk - 1 player with joystick 



MAY THE FORCE BE WITH YOU 



Tynesoft describe MI RAX FORCE as 

'The Ultimate Shoot 'em up', and whilst 
it is basically yet another addition to the 
long list of *Uridium' style scrolling 
space-zap games, this one certainly looks 
like giving the competition a fair run for 
their money. 

There's not anything very original 
about the plot, it's just anothej, 
flying your space craft 
over the Alien Morhership 
much of it a^ossible n& y* 
Eveniualltfth^foflfeBrdP'! 
begins to pulsamA 





MIRAX FORCE 



An initial glimpse of the ace title page 
acts as a brief graphical taster of what is to 
follow. The display scrolls horizontally 
over several screens, smoothly and in the 
direction of your choice at fast or slow 
speed as desired. Some amazingly 
intricate designs form a birds-eye view of 
tfibkMothership, and colours are chosen at 

nc%m each time you play. Occasionally 



L JWrowina n 



ash slightly but it's a small price to 
olmn interesting effect created most 
tinn.' All in all the game is a great 
displa* of the Atari's graphical 



level of play. Nouhat easy 



wc* 



the followi 

ofooufSe, since Alien defence ship 
tV:-:e\ er block yoLzr path in an an em 
halt your mission, and fire missjji 
can be very diff\dttQjWtfFAvoidinE 
these is not the onlyproblem - 
indestructible pylons , buildings and 
shadowed objects protruding from the 
surface of the Mothership must also be 
negotiated. Once again, an auto-fire 
joystick is highly recommended! 



■wing you accesjm"A^ capabilities. Congratulations Tynesoft 

r.^^you'y^Hscovered them at last! 




ound effects are pretty standard, but 
an added bonus is digitised speech created 
with the assistance of 2-bit Systems 1 
Replay package. This will hopefully kill 
the myth that quality' electronic speech is 
sacred to the ST fraternity! An extremely 
clear voice announces 'The battle begins', 
'Mirax Force* and 'Game over 1 . It 
possibly says other things as well, but 
unfortunately I didn't get far enough into 



the game to find out! MIRAX FORCE 

suffers from the same drawback as other 
space-zap games - it's not at all easy to 
progress very far without a great deal of 
practice. This does mean however, that 
the game would seem to offer lasting 
appeal, and at least the possibility of some 
extra speech should hopefully provide an 
added incentive to persevere! 

My only gripe concerns the brief 
instructions printed inside the inlay - not 
only are they riddled with mis-spellings 
and incorrect grammar, the loading 
instructions are wrong ton! Still, on the 
whole this is a first class effort from 
Tynesoft, who seem to have upped their 
previously standards considerably in 
recent months. It won't be every ones cup 
of tea, but if you're looking for a 
challenging and fast-paced scrolling 
space-zapper, you need look no further 
than MIRAX FORCE. 



Paul Rixon 



Published by Tynesoft. £7.95 on cassette - £9.95 on disk - 1 player with joystick 



Pajfc6- Issue 32 



8-BIT GAMES .... 8-BIT GAMES.... 8-BIT GAMES 



YOU LITTLE DEVIL! 



You may recall that LITTLE DEVIL 
was one of two Red Rat titles grabbing 
the headlines last issue following the 
absurd decision by a certain British 
distributor, along with others, not to 
stock it, supposedly to prevent gullible 
Atari ans being harmed by its alleged 
occult content(?!?). If past events in the 
publishing held are anything to judge by, 
this should (hopefully': ensure Red Rat of 
a best-seller, as Joe Public spares no 
inconvenience to experience what he is 
supposed not to see. This won't be a 
particularly difficult task, as Red Rat can 
supply the game directly. 

What's all the commotion about then? 
Well, sorry to disappoint you folks but 
LITTLE DEVIL is about as worthy of 
an ! X' rating as an episode of "Rainbow 1 ! 
Don't let this, put you off though. The 
game is in fact an excellent 
implementation of the platform variety, 
the objective being to collect items from 
each screen so as to progress onto further 



LITTLE DEVIL 



levels where the adversaries have 
multiplied, These items just happen to be 
lost souls floating in a limbo existence in 
the bowels of Hades, It's up to you, as the 
Little Devil himself,, to free the souls and 
thus advance onto further realms, taking 
you nearer and nearer to Castle Despair 
where King Mordread's imprisoned 
daughter - Princess Linarta - anxiously 
awaits her gallant rescuer! 

There would appear to be only four 
different screens in the game., but this 
shortcoming is more than compensated 
for by the impressive design-work 
forming the backdrop to each one, and 
the fact that controlling the Little Devil's 
jumps around each screen in the time 
limit allowed (twenty- five seconds!) is 
certainly not a feat to be taken lightly! It 
starts off fairly easily but after level one, 
extra static obstacles are added increasing 
the challenge immensely. Running out of 
Lime or brushing with a guardian ghostie 
causes the Devil to forfeit a life (in 



Hades??), so to make your quest a little 
less impossible, a number of 
life -pro longing facilities are available For 
instance, the time limit can be reset 
several times, and 'Arkanoid* style 
floating symbols can be captured to 
provide extra bonus points and stun the 
nasties for short periods. Additional resets 
and lives are automatically obtained upon 
completion of certain stages of the game. 

1 haven't mentioned the sound - this 
should be enough to tell you that it isn't 
exactly one of Red Rat's finest efforts in 
this respect, the music being a somewhat 
unconvincing rendition of Scott JoplhVs 
'.Elite Syncopation'- but overall 
LITTLE DEVIL can definitely claim to 
be another fine and much welcome 
addition to the range, one that will keep 
platform enthusiasts coming back for 
more to try and improve their standings 
in the highscorc table, thus assuring a 
super value for money purchase. 

Paul Rixon 



Published by Red Rat. £7,95 on cassette - £9.95 on disk - I plaver with joystick 



DRIVING YOU CRAZY! 



If you were to have read all of the 
instructions accompanying this latest 
offering in MIL's 'Top Ten' series, you'd 

be forgiven for thinking that it could 
possibly be the ultimate 3-D race game. 
In fact, it is a Cosmi title dating back to 
19H4 and Tm afraid it's probably the very 
worst race game currently available! 

Graphically, TALLADEGA bears 
more Lhan a passing resemblance to 'Pole 
Position', although on closer inspection it 
is inferior in design, colouring and 
animation, For example, the grass is 
grey(!) s your car always remains static - 
even when cornering - and the general 
movement of vehicles can be somewhat 
unpredictable. Sound is fairly mediocrej 
consisting of roars, beeps and an 
uninspiring theme tune, but on the whole 
the effect is reasonably acceptable and if it 
were not for the comments to follow, I 
wouldn't hesitate to recommend the 
game. 

You have a choice of racing on the 
'Tri-Oval' or a random circuit, although 
the random one seems to be virtually 
identical every time ''Bug #1). Then it's 



TALLADEGA 



onto the qualifying lap, which you pre 
supposedly aiming to complete in as little 
lime as possible in order to gain a 
favourable position on. the starting grid. 
However, if you do go as fast as possible 
the race will suddenly terminate at a 
certain stage with the erroneous message 
"Lap time exceeds 149.9 seconds* (Bug 
#2). Going slowly is. the only safe way to 
assure an interrupted completion! 
Regardless of what place you eventually 
manage to obtain on the grid, the race 
proper then commences with you in third 
slot, Richard Petty in second and 
someone called "I.M.Fast' in Pole 
position (Bug #3). Richard Petty 
immediately overtakes I, M. Fast and stays 
in first or second place for the remainder 
of the race. 

Opposing cars don't always appear 
from the horizon or behind - sometimes 
they simply materialize out of thin air, 
often just a short distance in front, 
causing an accident and again, 
termination of the race (Bug #4). The top 
speed is 2'5urnph, although 290mph can 
be achieved with Turbo-boost, and other 



"unavailable' speeds between these two 
have frequently been experienced! (Bug 
#5). It is also possible to slipstream so as 
to conserve fuel - one of 
TALLADF,GA\ more commendable 
features, Fuel levels and tyre wear are 
indicated above the main play area, so 
that you may judge when a pit stop is 
necessary. Here's a novelty - when you 
enter the pits, all of the other cars stop 
dead in their tracks and time stands still!! 
4 (Bug#6). 

Also symbolized are various status 
flags, and the name of the driver 
immediately ahead of you. Since it's 
impossible to drop any further back than 
second position - even when stationary - 
this never displays anything other than 
Richard Petty or *Player is in 1st place'! 
(Bug #7). 

These are just a selection of the many 
problems plaguing TALLADEGA. 
Without doubt it's the most bug-ridden 
commercial game I've been unfortunate 
enough to experience for a long time. 



Paul Rixon 



Published by iWaynard International Ltd. £1.99 on cassette - 1 player with joystick 



7* Page 6 - Issue 32 



8-BIT GAMES.... 8-BIT GAMES.... 8-BITGAMES, 



A NOVEL WAY TO GET A BUZZ! 



Amaurote is another game from the 

same Mastertronic label that brought 
Atari users 'The Last V8' and 
'Spellbound', so my expectations were 
understandably high. 

The cassette inlay rambles on about 
how you, as an officer in the Royal Army 
of Amaurote, have the task of clearing all 
25 districts of the city. The city has 
become infested by killer insects, and the 
population has taken flight. The army, 
after a bloody struggle, was forced to 
withdraw, and so it is up to you, as the 
last remaining uninjured officer, to take 
on the creatures single-handed. 

Once the program has eventually 
loaded, you are greeted by the credits, 
which are displayed on the viewscreep of 
your Arachnus 4 armoured car, 
accompanied by a stirring piece of music, 
The top 80",, or so of the TV is taken up 
by the viewscreen, with the remainder 
taken up by the control panel with all 
your instruments. This is very detailed, 
and quite difficult to make out at first. It 
consists of numerical readouts detailing 
your cash left, % damage to district, No. 
of bombs remaining, ",, damage to the city 
as a whole, and damage to your craft. 
There are two additional instruments - 
The Scanner, which allows you to 'home 
in' on the different insects and bombs, - 
and the Supabomb indicator, which 
flashes when you are carrying the 
Supabomb (funnily enough! ). 

You start the game proper by selecting 
which of the 25 districts of the city you 
wish to visit first. The objective is to clear 
each of these sectors of all the insects, so it 
makes little difference which sector you 
start with. There are different types of 
insect — Scouts fly around the city on the 
look out for food and intruders (i.e. you!), 
and then report your position back to the 
Queen. Drones are the most common and 
plentiful, and are sent out by the Queen 
to nab you. Once close to you, they are 
hard to shake off, 

Your craft is armed initially with 30 
bouncing bombs which are effective 
against these insects. Conventional bombs 
don't work against the Queen herself so 
you have to radio an order for a 
Supabomb, Pressing the Option key 
momentarily freezes the game and 
displays a menu of options. You have the 
choice of ordering a Supabomb, 
replenishing your stock of ordinary 



AMAUROTE 



bombs, repairing the Arachnus 4 or being 
transported to a different position AH of 
these use up your cash. You start with £5 
million which may seem like a lot, but I 
can assure you it is depleted very rapidly! 

After selecting the sector, you are 
greeted by a 3-D view of the area, with 
your Arachnus 4 sitting in the middle. 
Your viewpoint is above, and at a 45 
degree angle to, the action. The 
surroundings are detailed and have a very 
futuristic feel to them, with strange 
geometrical shapes abounding. Nudging 
your joystick moves your craft in the 
appropriate direction, Not only does it 
resemble a spider in looks, it also moves 
like one on its, albeit 4(!), pincer-type 
legs, In the background, atmospheric- 
chamber music plays. The animation is 
quite impressive and the view reminiscent 
of the Knight Lore Alien 8 games of old. 
The screen doesn't scroll, but flips when 
you near the edge. 

SooneT or later, you arc likely to come 
across one of the insects, probably a 
Drone. These pad towards you, and once 
spotted, you have a hell of a time trying to 
lose them, so you decide to let fly at them 
with one of your incredible bouncing 
bombs. You push the joystick towards the 
varmit and press the fire button, only to 
see the bomb soar out over the top of the 
insect and off the screen! You then have 
to wait until the bomb hits something (a 
building usually!) before you can fire 
again. Hy that time, the insect has 
probably caught up with you, and is 
rapidly draining your energy. This is one 
of the major gripes I have. It is incredibly 
difficult to hit the thing you are aiming 
Rit, as the bomb takes an age moving, by 
which time the target has moved miles 
from the spot you were aiming for! 

After playing for a while you can 
develop a technique to track down Drones 
using the Scanner, but it is by no means 
easy, usually requiring firing from one 
screen, blind, onto another. After a time, 
you will no doubt be ready to take on the 
Queen herself First you must order a 
Supabomb, which is dropped at a random 
location, (By the way, the incidental 
music which accompanies the radio 
screen and the zone select screen is 
excellent). After locating and collecting 
this, you are ready to find and destroy the 
Queen. Note that the Supabomb is 
primed and armed when picked up, which 



means that you cannot use the normal 
bouncing bombs en route, so beware. 
Arrowy on the scanner lead you to the 
Queen, which you must hit with your 
bomb. This can be tricky, as by this time 
she is probably onto your plan and has 
arranged a 'welcoming party 1 of drones. 
It's a good idea to clear these before even 
picking up the Supabomb. Assuming you 
manage to destroy the Queen, wiping out 
the remaining insects in the sector is 
relatively easy, as they are no longer 
under her command and then, all that 
remains is to do the same in all the other 
24 districts ... and you've already used 1 
million - tut, tut! 

Despite my criticisms, I enjoyed this 
game. The graphics arc excellent, as is the 
animation, although it does slow down 
slightly with a few drones on screen, The 
presentation is superb, from the 
professional 'look' to the many extra 
touches, such as the Radio and the Zone 
selection screen, to the atmospheric music 
which accompanies the title & Radio 
screens etc. 

The music during the game is good, 
but a bit repetitive. I found the movement 
a bit sluggish and quirky, making 
manoeuvres difficult at the best of times. 
The firing, as I've mentioned, is another 
sore point. It's too difficult to hit what 
you want to hit, as you have to be on 
exactly the same line, and the right 
distance away when you fire. Having said 
that, with practice, it 15 possible to fool 
the drones and escape them. The Repair 
and Rescue options are also very useful 
(and well used!}, The game does play 
slowly, but then again, it is basically a 
strategy game with good graphics. It will 
take patience and a great deal of skill and 
time to complete, trying to keep city and 
district damage low, whilst keeping an eye 
on available funds! 

Despite my reservations, I kept on 
coming back for more (a glutton for 
punishment), which indicates good 
payability, perhaps the most important 
factor. In summary, great graphics, good 
sound, excellent music and presentation, 
A very professional product on the whole 
and well worth the £2.99 price tag it 
carries. At this price, it's a steal, and I 
wholeheartedly recommend it. Keep up 
the good work, MasterLronic! 

Gordon Cameron 



Published by Mastertronic M.A.D. - £2.99 on cassette - 1 player with joystick 



Page 6- Issye 32 



Mark Hutchinson 



i 




NUMBERS 



This issue I thought I might explain some mathematical 
manipulations that have been used in previous columns It i* all 
very simple so you will not need to book in at your local college 
for an 'O' level maths course! 

If you.did not already know, the computer contains a section 
of memory that you can either read or write to called random 
access memory (RAM) and memory that cannot be written to, 
called read only memory (ROM), 

STORING NUMBERS IN MEMORY 

RAM can be pictured as a series of little boxes, or 
pigeonholes, each containing a number from to 255 . Each 
number gives the computer a piece of information. As you may 
know from past articles, memory is made up of millions of little 
switches (bits) in blocks of eight (this is why your machine is 
termed 9-bit)- Each switch has two conditions, either on or off. 
Mathematically, any combination of eight with two states 
means two to the power of eight - 256 (0 to 235), 

Supposing we want to store numbers greater than 255? For 
this we must us,e two memory locations. One is termed the low 
byte and stores the numbers to 255, equivalent to the units (0 
to 9) in decimal. The second is the high byte and stores the 
multiples of 256's, equivalent to the tens in decimal. What if we 
want to store 255? This can be stored just in the low byte, as can 
any number from to 255 but if we had 256 we would store it 
as 1 in the high byte and clear the low byte to zero. 

As an example, I will pick a number at random - 57344. This 
needs to be split into multiples of 256 so first 1 find the high 
byte by dividing this number by 256. The result is 224, Any 
remainder will be less than 256 and will be stored in the low 
byte, To find the remainder I multiply 224 by 256 and subtract 
it from 57344, In this case the remainder is zero. If you want to 
include this in your own programs then it will be as follows, 

10 NUMBER ^57 344 

20 I IIGHBYTE - NUMBER 256 

30 LOWBYTE=NUMBER-256*HIGHBYTE 

I should point out here that mathematical equations are 

worked out in a certain order irrespective of how they appear in 






TlftlfplfS 



a program line, In order of priority they are: 

Brackets 

of, e.g. a third of six 

division 

multiplication 

addition 

subtraction 

In Line 30, therefore, the HIGHBYTE is multiplied by 256 
before it is subtracted from NUMBER. 

WHY STORE NUMBERS? 

Why do we need to use all this at all? Well) within the RAM 
are certain locations called POINTERS. A pointer is a signpost. 
It contains a number which will point to another location in 
memory, So what is the point of that I hear you pun! Well, let's 
have an example. Location 756 is just such a pointer. It holds a 
number that, when multiplied by 256 will send the computer to 
a location where all the characters are stored, By sheer 
coincidence, this number lust happens to be 224. Now, suppose 
we stored another character set at 57856. By changing the 
number stored in location 756 we can send the computer to 
57856 for a different character set. This number is, of course, 
57856-256 (226 exactly). 

Now for your homework and a bit of magic. Set up your 
computer in a GRAPHICS 1 screen and print something on it 
using PRINT #6; 'TEXT" (or ?#6; "TEXT" for short), As 
usual, you will sec that the characters are in upper case, so clear 
the screen. Print POKE 756,226 and press RETURN Now try 
printing to the screen and see what happens. 

OTHER EXAMPLES 

Another often used example is to lower the top of RAM to 
protect memory- Location 106 holds a number which relates to 
the amount of RAM available. This number must be multiplied 
by 256. Each unit is called a 'PAGE' of memory and four pages 
= IK of RAM (4 times 256 - 1024 = IK}, 

Let us pretend that we wish to protect 4K of memory (the 
protected size must be in multiples of 256). First we must find 
out how many pages are available by PEEKing location 106, 
then subtract 16 (the number of 256'a in 4K) from this total and 
POKEing the new number into the location, i.e. 

10PAGE = PEEK(106) 
20 NEWPAGE = PAGE- 16 
30 POKE 106,NEWPAGE 

An easier way to do this is by 

10 POKE 106 s PEEKf 106)-16 



Ml 



Page fi - Issue H 



Make sure that you reset the RAM top before a graphics call. 
this will ensure that the new details for the display list are 

properly stored. 

USING OFFSETS 

In a previous article, 1 explained about the IOCB and gave 
some details about offsets. Rather than POKE to several 
different locations, having to remember each one, why not take 
one as a base and POKE to the base plus an offset. For example, 
we know that the character set starts at 57344. To change the 
full character set by POKEing each individual location would 
take 1024 lines of POKE LOCATION, DATA. The easiest 
way would be to take 57344 as a base and add one each time 
then POKE in the DATA, This is called incrementing. To do 
this properly, the offset or increment would have to start off at 
zero, not 1, otherwise the first POKE would be at 57345. We 
could change the base to 5714^ and start the offset at 1, but 
when you looked up this location much later it would not make 
immediate sense (it is a floating point logarithm routine!). 

Unfortunate ly, the character set is in ROM and we cannot 
change it. We can store a new character set in RAM though. It 
only needs the pointer to be changed to indicate this new 
location and your characters automatically change, Listing 1 is a 
small routine to do just that. 

Some points to note. I used a location suitable for this demo, 
I used a flag of - 1 to make sure the program finished without an 
error. This is not strictly necessary but it does save the 
annoyance of inputting too much data. Also, lines 100 and 1 10 
could be combined as line 100 (the computer automatically 
keeps track of the data to be read), but I did this for clarity, 
Notice how the space character has been changed. Even if yon 

cannot see the characters, type POKE 756,224 and press 
RETURN to get the old set back. Try new DATA and run it 

again. 

That is all for this time. Since I have given you some hints on 
graphics modes and how to store them, why not read the next 
thrilling installment and find out how to draw some pictures? 

Don't forget that you can write with any problems. Include a 
s.a.e. if you want a reply. Write to Mark Hutchinson, 1 
Holly mount, Erinvale, Finaghy, Belfast, BTlO OGL 





Listing 1 


hi: 


? rem *** set base at a new position. 


LA 


IB bA5E=lS24S 


LQ 


13 REM *** S*:«M a reading loop. 


JO 


Z8 TOR OFF5ET=e TO B 


CF 


29 REM *** Make sure the loop ends pro 




perly. 


CP 


30 READ DATA! IF DATA=~1 THEN 60 


BY 


39 REM *** Place data in new location. 


GL 


40 POKE BASE + OFFSET^ATA 


UR 


A9 REM «Ht continue the loop. 


DK 


SO HEHT OFFSET 


CD 


59 REM «** Tell the c onputer where to 




find the new set. 


TI 


CO POKE 756,102 4 0/2 56 


KC 


69 rem **** Finish the program. 


YU 


78 END 


GI 


99 REM K»K DATA 


KB 


100 DATA 0,127, 00, 24, 0,24, BO, 127 


T5 


199 REM *** Finish off progran. 


FV 


110 DATA -1 




MJDBASE (ISSUE 30): Reader Peter Boulter tells us he 
has discovered a small bug when the drive is set to or 2 

and option 7 is chosen from the menu, The program goes 
into an endless loop between lines 18850 and 18870. The 
fix was to replace GOTO 18850 in line 18870 with GOTO 
19450. 

REVISION C FOR CASSETTE (ISSUE 31 )j 
Unfortunately line 1 160 was missing from the listing which 
can only be accounted for by Phil's typing abilities! The 
missing line is: 

QQ 1160 DATA 1,21 1,9,2,141,1,21 1,96,0,0,733 

BOWLTRAP (ISSUE 31 ); The program will not run on 
400 800 models as listing due to a bug in the OS on these 
computers. The last time this obscure bug caught up with 
us was in DRAUGHTS' in issue 16. 400 800 owners must 
change line 60 to: 

KQ60 POKE 106,PEEK(10u)-10: CS = PEEK(106} + 2: 
C5BASE-CS*256: GOSUB 1300 

FONT FACTORY (ISSUE 31 >: Cassette users must 

make Lhe following changes to be able to load and save 
properly. Delete lines 2930, 2Q40, 2950, 2960, 2970, 2980 
and amend line 4610 as follows: 

KD 4610 IF FXS(1,2) = "C;" THEN DV» = "C:": POKE 
752,0: FLS = FXS: FFS=FXS: RETURN 



MORE PROGRAMS 
WANTED 

Don't be shy! Same of you have written, some very good 
programs which are just sitting at home doing nothing- 
Dig them out and send them in to PAGE 6 For possible 
fame and fortune! 

We want games of all hinds, arcade, simulation, two 
player, logic games or any other kind of game you can 
think ol' We want utilities, home productivity, business 
programs, programming examples and more. In Fact we 
want arty kind of program that shows off your Atari, 

We will pay you a detent sum for any programs 
published and you will have the privilege of seeing your 
programs in what many people consider the finest Atari 
magazine. PAGE 6 loves Atari and we may well love your 
program but we can't tell you so If you don't send it In, can 



Please send programs an disk (or cassette if you don't 
have a disk drive) together wiih supporting documentation 
(also on disk or cassette if possible). Feel free to give us a 
ring first If you are not sure but dig out those programs or 
write them from scruteh. It could be well worth It. Write 



PHIL CARD WELL 

PAGE 6, P.O. BOX 54, 

STAFFORD 

ST16 1DR 



I'aec 6- Jsmjc .12 



^1 



RESOURCE FILE 



The Resource File is a service 
provided by PAGE 6 to help 
Atari owners (both 8-bit and 
ST) find sources of 
information, help and supply. 
An entry in (.his feature does 
not necessarily imply any 
endorsement by PAGE 6 and 
readers are advised to check 
for themselves to ensure that 
the information is still 
current. We would ask any 
readers who find information 
to be inaccurate or out of date 
to let us know so that an entry 
may be amended or deleted. 



RETAILERS 



ABC 

135 S[- Leonards Road 

Lcjceiier 

I.FJJBZ 

Tel, 053*TDOL<W 

ATARI WORLD 

1 S, I r en.n*ll Street 
Vtaaehester 
AH 3DLI 
Td-(h5l 81-1 4941 



BRIGHTON COMPUTER EYCHANCH 

!, Ann Street 

Krig/hran 

BN1 4GP 

Tel. DI" 1 ! 6**6*0 

(.IMPS 

5*. Rugby Rend 

Worthing 
Susses BM I SNII 

COMPCTHl ADVENTURE WORI A 
UnnJi Buildings 
1 A, Charing Cmu 

Birkenhead I Jl UliJ 
Tel. 051 M* I1JA 

COMPUTER CAVERN 

21, Harris Arcade 

Reading 

H.-rks l«.- ID>" 

Tel. OTM *~U~6S 

COlMPUTEB CENTRE 
] TJ, High Since 
llurrtL'hurch 

TeLu4A14?M13 

GAMER 

7 L I :.i -- Sutci 

Brighton 

I iiinr-ff*T" 1HQ 

Tel- ffi'3 TlSbti I 

GLAStitJW COMPUTER CE,VTRIi 

Virginia Galleries 

3 J Virginia Street 

QImmmi 

Gl ITU 

Tel-D415i2 1522 

HI-FI WKSTERN' LTD. 
SI, Cambrian Road 
Newport 
{■went 

tcl.**3)*37W 



ivi'tvm 

1, rleathcoai Street 

Hockley 

Noin. NCI 3-AF 

Tel. 9*12 4I0W 

JENNINGS STORES 

2U-HK Hertfnrd Hnad 

Knlleld 

MJdda 

Tel. (i I SOU 'f 

LADBROKB COMPUTING LTD. 
33, Ofuiklrk Road 
Pre&tim 
Lanes, PR I :QP 

Tel- W2 2WU 

LIVINGSTON COMPUTER CENTRE 

IT, The Mall 

Craigithill Shopping Centre 

Livingston. 

West Lothian 

Tel. I15G6 J*»7S 

MICHO-TRON1CS 
2 :a t Market Sire*! 
Tnmwnrth 
Stuffs 
TeI.0R27 SUN 

I'.KML'RPHT & SONS LTD. 

I H.V.I.INIV 

Drughfda 

Cn- I-outh 

Ireland 

Tel- (HI Jtl** 

OXIi KTliF HI-VONI) 1.1 I). 

I I j , ( ,:t vtk- Meadow 
>"on»lch 

XR] IDG 

Tel. 0#H «*V« 



PEATS ELECTRONICS 

197, Parntll Street 

Dublin 1 

Ireland 

Tel. HOI 7277W 

RADFORD HI-FI LTD. 

S2, tjlnueeater Knad 

Bristol 

Avxin 

Tel. «Ti 4J524? 

sii.k:hn CENTRE 

7, Aniieua Street 
tidinburph 

Scotland 

Tel, Oil SST 45*6 

SOFTWARE EXPRESS 
tH-ili, Alum Rock Road 

Alum Kciek 

Birmingham BK 

Tel.(*:r J2K3iHS 

SOFTWARE EXPRESS 
212, Urnad Street 

Birmingham 
I1I5 2AY 

Tel. Oil 643 91 00 

AS. WOOTTON ft SON 

116, hdlrjum Road 

Crewe 

CWI7HD 

Tel. 02711 21*11* 

YORK COMPUTER CENTRE 
4, Davygate Arcade 

llDWgate 

VoriVOl2SL! 

Tel- 0404(1* I R(42 



USKR GROUPS 



ABC 

Contact iMikeDonogliuc, 13% St. 
Leonards Road, Leicester, L.E2 "SBZ. 
Tel. 0533 700190. Retailer and both 
8-bic and ST user groups. 

ATARI USKR GROUP 
(IRELAND) 

Contact 100, Silloge Avenue, 

Ballvmurn, Dublin il„ Iceland. Tel. 
Dublin 425*18 

BESTWOOD S-HtT USER 

GROUP 

Contact David Taylor, 60 Stevenholmc 

Crescent, Bestwood Park., Nottingham, 

NG5 5JW, Tel, 0M)2 209739. tt-bit 

local users only. 

BOURN E MOUTH AND POOLE 

ATARI USER GROUP 

Contact Colin Hunt. 248, Wimbome 

Road, Oakdale, Poole, Dorser. ST, 

S-bit, hardware and software 

development. 



BBS 



Name: GAMLING AY TBBS 

Number: 0-7&7 5O5 11 
Hours: 24 hours 
Baud: 300-2400 
hearures: Atari SIG and 
program library 

Name: THE VILLAGE 
Number: M 4&4 2516 
Hours: 24 hours 7 days 
Baud: V21, V22, V22BI5, V2J 

Features: 8 bil area, ST area, V.V .VI 



Name: INFOMATIQUE 

Number: 0001 764942 (Dublin; 
Hours: 24 hours 
Baud: 300 }Qti and 75 1000 
Features: ATARI SIG and program 

library 



HLKY ST. EDMUNDS USER 
GROUP 

Contact Gary Hrummage, 22, Ridley 

Road, Bury St, Edmunds, Suffolk. 
LP33 3HS. Please send S.A.E. for 
details, 

CROMWELL ATARI USER 

GROUP 

Contact Dave Legjetr, 1, Chestnut 

Close, Brampton, Huntingdon, Cambs. 

Tel. 0480 50553. All users welcome, 

FLOPPYSHOP ST 

Contact Steve Delancy, 50, Srcwart 

Crescent, Nortbticld, Aberdeen, AB2 
5SR- Tel. 0224 691A24. 

The GATEWAY CLUB 

Contact Phil Hefberer, l&4d Radcliffc 

Road, Lakenhealh, Suffolk, Tel, 
fEtiswell) 2363. All cumpuler clue with 
Atari section. Meets tincc- a month. 

LACE (LONDON ATARI 

COMPUTER ENTHUSIASTS 
Contact Glenn Leadet, 143 Richmond 
Road, Leytcmstone, London El 1 4BT, 
Tel. 01 556 0395. XL XE ST users. 
Cmii ne*-slei«r and PD librirv. 



Name: CJIARLV 

Number: 0451 31642 from Germany 

010 40 451 31642 from England 
Hours: 24 hours 7 days 
Baud: 300, Snl 

Features: Atari 8- bil and ST areas. 
P.D. Nftware. Some German required! 

Narm IHK AKK 

Number: 021 -353_5486, 

Hours: 24 bours. 7 davs 

Baud: 100 or 1200 75 

Features: B bit with Dov-ttloads,, hints, 

swapf. etc. 

Name: CHASE ST USER GROUP 

Number: 0543S 71562 

Hours: 2100 Friday to 0900 Monday 

Baud- 300- 1200 iV2 1 V22VJ 

Features: Atari PD, MSDOS PD, 

CPMB0 



L.A.CE. 

Contact Bob Chewter or D. (Caption, 
i \. (iarden Close, Chinhniok Road, 
London, SEI2«TG 

MACCLESFIELD COMPUTER 
CLUB 

Contact Peter Solomon. Tel- 0625 
20782 evenings and weekends,. All 
computer club with Atari section, 
Meets fortnightly. 

Ml-RSEVSIDE ATARI CLUB 

Contact Mike Lynch, 24, Oakdene 
Road. Anfield, Liverpool, Mersey side, 
L4 2SR, Tel 051 264S4J5. ST ONLY. 
Regular meetings, newsletter and more. 

RAGE HARD A.UvG. (S-blt) 

Contact Tony Longworth, i 3 , 
Greenfield Road, Little Sunon, South 
VC'irral, Cheshire, L66 IPE. Tel. 051 
119 0405. For B-hit users everywhere, 
Send s.ii.e. for details. 

ST CLUB 

Contact Paul Glover, P.O. Bent 20, 
Hertford, S13 SNN. Mail only(?), 
Worldwide. 



Name: THE GNOMK AT HOME 

Number: 01 888*894 

Hours: 24 hr)urs.'7 days 

Baud: V23 viewdata 

Features: ST area frame *I632.0jf. 

Micros on frame 'micros 

Name; CB ABBS 

Number; 021 430 3761 

Hours: 24 hours 'dosed Thursdays 

Baud: 300 

Features: ST/fi bit, Email to USA and 

Canada 

Name: LEICESTER CENTRAL 

Number: 0533 70m 14 
Hours: 24hoQri 
Baud: 300 and 1200/75 

Kcarures: 8 bit area and ST area 



VTB ATARI *:OMPUTERCLUB 

Contact Christian Delnbarre, Hekitra.tr 
7, 905O Evcrgem, Belgium. Tel. 
iWl 26,29,29, For XL, XE, ST. 
Organised talks visits Ctc 

WORI.O ATAftI PENPALS Int. 
User Group [WAP i 
t iontacl Man Terveen, Magerhorsi M, 
Alphen a d Riin, 2402 LP, The 
Netherlands . Tel . 1 720 455B3 , 
Members in USA, Canada, France, 
U.K., Greece, Germany, Saudi Arabia, 
Have circulating disk (8-bit and ST). 
Mail only. 



Do you want others » know about 
your group? Send details is above 
ONl-V 15 words mux. on Member 1 -' Ofl 
3 plain sheet ol paper beaded 
RESOIKO-. FILE -USER 
GROUPS. 

Thai's all you get! We will not 

publish any other details as meeting 
times and places tend to change, 
Appoint -someone responsible lo handk' 
any enquit ies received. 



PAliH 6 reserves the right to 
delete any entry from this 
feature for any reason. 
Inclusion does nut imply any 
endorsc merit by PAGIv i» aLtid 
PAGE 6 can accept no 
responsibility for the accuracy 
or completeness of an entry- 
Please tell us If you find any 
entry out of dale. 



Do you run a Bulletin Board which 
caters mainly for Atari fl-bir or H'V> For 
an entry in this feature pkssc send us 
details as above (5 words max on 
Features!) on a plain stieeiol paper 
headed RESOURCE FILE - BBS 

Any background information 
included will be lilcd for reference but 
not published, 



82 



Page 6 — Issue 32 



NBKtUW PUCE 517 




ONLY FROM SILICA 



F m. t itiHm'i h iiHi^ji ■*! :xjiiipjlnr ihAr ntfl OCilf *0>w** CnDD*'*** liL* (Slh* wmpijaar*. bdl Hlt:i arivitt ' 

lb* one profcaam *hn oihar L-nmpularL hflh«* crulod Aftardabrfiiy Silkii Shop ata plaaiad to pfMont Ihs , 
ST range ol personal. 1 bus mini compulcfi Irom Atin The ST *u a*sip«fiErd jhliiiro, bha moil recant . 
biHkih-QughE n lefnicondijclor 6pchnc*>QV. p'odbcirra a personal computer IKaJ. pe^ormF Ibf*i wi|h 

Itwtii W*| aTVriirtn m4#Jrt*S 4 444*1 l*U 10> ffl4ta# And 444 10 &vy Th# IdlEHT ST £0ffl£iii[arft ii(m Miilnd+i 

bull i^pofwr juppwsirtd buM in fldk cKivai IT* TOS ciwralir^ lyiM-m ind L»EM *iJ.doai ervirnrflicnt 
pr* now on JiOM r.*i"pi w*i»rh a«* already inalalled -t lh* ST ■VEryboaid This- OMtofei ai>1nfTi*1iic 'nrlan? 
traong ■hviY^i#mB£n<in fiilnia 5/^>pAiH plAaiaa laortai ihft tnuipmiit Aun RT r^iri^H On' ir*). ardor 
d*p*1m*r!:.s jiiLalaiiin Sidcup *nd wa<nai«-3-nic4il c-jHats at Sidcup. Liar H&jh ; r atlanhaii Court ttd|> 

a-tl SnllinlijMi. |Qil,,:r:l =!rnHl| Wm hp.-p myM vh^tk htf*!khtt!;-ih pi A1mti pir.Hh..::!*- li>n:j|Hr 'liAri hi 11 ^ :iITihi' I 

UK company jrdjvc ##ll unat- -spa-d aunt JK's*lo 1 Ala/i iptcMtfaat .WMh J. group burnoiw d* ovr-rlS 

in h.t- |nij .-» kj:*v i; 1 ty'l 3I3.II. Bfe- ivflip jfuu L. nh^lpitJlp wn*ii;c *iiiJ [•JpP" 1 ' 1 Wh [ii :h-f:Ih ihvhia 

(kIIIuh whth itckj mM llnd irhaluuUikj- during yw Aiari campuhng life and moil ar Itou- liciinmi art 
miMjUa CHkJt t*\0H SILICA Wt KjflB«l 1r41 you rend ihrc-jgh whal wo f**mj lo olfe". bflforv you | 

FREE STARTER KIT - Only From Silica 

Wh#" ftfV pilf^n*** t^f Alfln ST ■ tn/bwd.. ymf ■pdjltf cin,|y "reSPiT |h«i Entll ^nlyc ^V miinplf CC»Tlp'J*6' 
LH1 *M dUrkni. EsJI i^Qn ■ill t#i> ,-ft<:i^iri« ThA ffilh'iwr-iij fniili AU'i CiVpnTn'-ni^' *■ ^l-T <il ThA pJjZhJQ* 

'AiaCL^iiJUwDiiA p fiJS , , l i7A#Mujr 'iTT'Difr.'wn Minudr " T^KL-ISEM a n- ACMf 
ilynj b^p j-oj' Si Irnm '*■ <ca ShDp.yau will alio reemva 

WCIcT'^rcvTM: -SanTptor - cntovr grapt?ic3 pnpcyff?* ' W M^jncr - Htortf *V»cei*P4?if 
I'.MBiiion. «*ir Silica vftuid liMn 10 Wjw i|HF :jM 10 4 llyn- fl nan w i|h T Oui' n*i- c^i^fXiiflr. to w* nan« 
pittDQ«a>af a opaclal 1TBTJUITEH KIT w(irt.i Ordi- 11CD. Hfuch «d art giving awi r - FREE DF ChUHQE 
wdh r«r> ST :omputf purchased ai our narmjl vjiiI pr>t*a. Tha kM 19 ivailabk- ONLY FROM SILICA 
Indiiwrrwti al providing uian- wdh a vaiunWe- "Plraihjclii>i lolhe wurld ol GDrnpiriinrj VVe-BrB CDrdirLMlr^ 

L#4i*di*g iHh 5T5MrHir fell. «,Kv.h l: y 11 'jii n S nublK; d ">*"#. -i RiiriglhpilicenHdHUllw*^ *4 "*» M tOOkft. 

■aqaonaj aro JcuuHiai all r**vannrj-ST trrfrfKih^g Return tta r:fii..if^ri ImIitw iDrlull emails 

I DEDICATED SERVICING - Oniy From SfUca 

U Smci Shop, wa hjv* a duiicdwd a*YVru dapjrt^anc ol Mrnan lull tuna Ara/I kair*d lachnicil uatf 
Ttatoflm 4 loWlv d*dir*1ad Id- KfVKtng ^ila'i oompubv producbi. Thvir BccuTiulabK] «-iawiml3t. rt«n 

hid l-jcfrtiptiiuH makadk Chart tocxnn] 1$ ra^n* 111 ihftir IihIiI yViii iJii !m mi.-k \\<a". hi .■ w:ii*. i.rirnnil :"i 1 1 ~ 1 -, 

I Ihtrn 11 rjl Iha highav siaidard A flbandua- at servicing nhch wo t-f4vc you will ha OHLT FRO¥ 

SILICA r |MMe(1 li; iir-ib-^ing '.ill HH-wii.iing IhkiIiIin I1.11 A|*n ST -::-um^i 1.1 1^15 |*ii.: r h in -111! i> il -nl 

I MjrrjnN'i.':-. 1 Iti- is uaa able IpoHV n-t^Qrv and mudvliror -ja^adu ta ST compulcfi 
1Mb HAM UP<JnAD€: IAjt upgrida an Irw Uwidartf Alan lzui>i-m cr afOST-^M kevboard w>u 

■ Wil li ITw -himi ; .v '..'ii MW bO I WlMJ KM* II I m I 1 >• <■ »*thii^ -i-ul iv hvhiIAUIh lnn- 

™" jjI b- KkJn.inil 'fluil rn>r.*ol .:^,l v EM96 |-VA T E1Q0| 
I TV HOOULATDn UP^FXADC: &Uci can upgrade 1h# 1D4DST f ta ttichtdm * TV mcdulatar so 
|hj| yuj ct" IPw use- il with your I V swl. T hn -a an iMarnal Lpgrad* ard doea nol involve- any untidy 
axwnfl bO«"i A Mtjie lr> uur-nwl vou* ST lo any fcimni.c T"tf jb ir»cluo«d n lhe prica of \rm ij&tiW& 
a**di hi eriv U!l line VAT> Tr^utf>o/iKI* "* *lM Jhiflilab***^ *ar»K iSOST co^VuK^ ai ihfl a*itih prlcn 

THE FULL STOCK RANGE - Oniy From Silica 

tfnj Jim la awp stocks: ol all *!a- - i related piouucla-anrjou' warahouaei carrwa- m aijmsh; kA c-var t'-v milliy*n 
¥ni kaaao/i many loriiwaiA cnlH| -JirOCi ln;rr, inh ij%A and y>>u will Imd iei*i wa na.H imw iHlAauut tfi 
■dpvctol maiyol o>jr -lomrMMn^ii L>nllkB duktra -ahu m^ 1 only aback Hlecltd rnlrti >nt hav« lr* pjII 
| na^ia In addilmn. we car*v a comptolc Ima Df all nooks. Wnich. ha.va Door written atoul Hha- Ara/i 1-. I 4 
■*-[f? « -KJe as rjuir 11 wmelNig vdu will tad is a-aHabe- M4LV f ROM tklCA. 

[ AFTER SALES SUPPORT - Only From Silica 

a Of /bM>i|d4 lAd-d*w*h>efiftAM! Thrii will hrtlp li> irfUfajiJ y£u ndb Ift dlld wilH imw IDlrMufn ntaaHl 

ii -hai's hjppcT-i.rug m Ihfr Atan mnrkat And ir addihon, our salei i1dH ara ar the and a' a 

filCiHrjiOciill ol yiMJr A|gri rwjijii^mBP,1|! Ify-nij pijnr^tgHi J»i §T lri>n fiilii:H pud htinlil IiBlh 

I any Mcrrmcal achlc* *a ham a lull tuma ctehnicarf Lupparl uim ic nalp you flal lht ami from your 
wnwfcr Aqciijuwo hawbolfi Ihtatirft jnd lhe ivslerr s spec iically cvdicaled Id pritviding arlpr h)w 

HTiKa tin Aiail ST CAfri|liiDtVA w« hih i.irihiM<il Ihll <inr nanhrf *fiK:y An 4i£afpliuTially nigh Itfvtri c4 
i lucparl r*- jean WCDtvCd ONLY FROH SILICA 

\FREE CATALOGUES - Only From Silica 

I ai. $Hica £r«op, ttt njcopnix If- a: k^ipji users 'aquirci an m-deplh informalion ser-ice, wh*ch is why wt 
mai ai**>Tt*^iefl|Hn qnd pn« IibIe to our GT gwnqrs- These dtei up lu *6 p*g«F lor>g #"ni anp or«mm«d 
a«ri iiKhfiitiJ hhIhiIi ai wNl Hh u^tj^i fjltaA And nri.H3i.ii.:r ilAfe.i siiniiiH if > i ■ i ■ hftvA already purcrukidd JTi 
ST and «culd like- ca ha«a vottf riamB added id our mailing Hal. pfuu c&mplcia IhpB'Mijpnn (L ralum d to 
ui Thig miDrmalKin itnnca a Bi-ulaW* ONLY FRDM SILICA 

fflFf OVERNIGHT DEL/VERY - From Silica 

Moat D'd*'s nu p fj r »a i<| Q ihi'iH.^h -oui 1 ^meiunar" wiitiin 74 .iriurt <e~il nacaiving irum Moje ruurehaarai 
ardri are- sanl by bh4 ovar.^qht QHCMJP 4 couriar *ari>c* FREE OF CHARGE to ojalDfrran Metim ana 
ijk Theimplhad halpitoemura mmirvwm [leaaryand maximum prolectan 

PRICE MATCH - Only From Silica 

Wthapa IhBTl rtw umbinacon jI ai_r law prvuai, FREE UK dalloary mivicb, FREE Sktrlar ^.1 ithJ FREE 
**fc" i»4fl- auppod. wiw be enough to n-^ie- you buy your laian Dquipmewrt Iroen Silica Shop I' bcnpre<¥Br. 

Ih+ifil ir.iUHlhii'ij yi>. . wik/'i h: [i.iri;lniw. pn|3 y<io* lind »"f 0' <nj# itiinipf^iluin i^liriru il Al a \iyM+f (n-ifs*. 

|hfn pieaio contacl du/ sakka doparlrT>*nt r provkdlng ua mr.h oui> com poll tor a nawnn, Bodr*u and 

laaae*crta number il m,r ci>npelirjDr has IhegtKrfF tn fIdc*. wa •¥* ncrrujaiy match lhe yripr 

product ifc~a prit*' cuuiai and inn nrnvirlA yr^j rtn rur niwiruil Ira* ddlivury Wa rauHJA thai wa ara noi 

| ibf nnr r cornfuny who w II maoch a cofPfpalitara pice However, \t you coma to ua tor * price match, you 

w4\ 111/:- EM hmIMIhhI 10 Ov ?J|Hr -Lpkij ^rvtcv. inrjl^dirq fifp iihwi.*t1I^-* And hpCAnitai an^i^Jil Thiia 

I rraiai aurpfict match prumiu-patrwrip*caJ, aar*ih.nn y^J *'H r*c*-#c ONLY FROM SILICA Wedr^il 
L^iiii^iin io^o jrr^StHq wIjj- lo 1 your Alan proOXtcfc So ihopal&feca. Iha UK a r4ol Alari Specialiil 

[ 01-300 1 

J-J Tfte Mews. Hathertey Road, Sidcup. Kent. DAW 4DX 

I LONDON 01-58O 4S3f 

Lion House (1$! floor), 227 Tottenham Court Rd, London. WiP OHX 

LONDON 01-629 1234 ext 3914 

Salfridges (1st floor), Oxford Street, London. WtA tAB 



+VAT=£299 



SO MUCH FOR SO LITTLE!] 

There is ngthing that can compar-e wilh the incredible value lor money olfered by Alari's 
5^0ST-FM, For only £260- (+VAT=£299), you can purchase a powerful 51?K RAM computer, 
with a 95 key keyboard (including numeric keypad), MIDI inter race, GEM, a pal site of 51? 
colours, mouse controller, and a S12K built-in disk drive. The 52QST-FM has a TV modulator 
built-in. and comes with a lead to allow you to plug il straight into any domestic colour 
televisron sel. The- mams transformer is also built-in to the keyboard, ?o lhare ara no messy 
external boxes You couldn't wish for a more compact, powerful and stylish unit. Atari ST 
computers are now firmly established in the UK., there are nearly 500 software titles already 
available for a wide variety of applications and the list is growing all the lime. And that's not 
all- When you buy your new S20ST-FM (or any Atari ST computer) from Silica Shop, you will 
get b lot more, including a FREE Silica ST Starter Kit worth over £100. Read the ONLY FROM | 
SILICA section on the left, to see why you should buy your new high power, low price S20ST- 
FM from Silica Shop, the UK's Nm Atari Specialists. For further details of the range of Atari 
ST computers and lhe FREE Silica ST Starter Kit, complete and relurri Iha reply coupon t*low. 

ATARI 520ST-FM NOW ONLY £260 OVAT=£299)| 

LSMST-FM mrittl 512K RAM t mono monitor WW (inp W: Upgrade from 51 2K RAM lo 102«t HAM £1M line VATK 



ATARI 1040ST-F - NEW PRICE 

W« arfl plnasuwl In jrwiaunca J new reduced price point Oft DH 
10UST-F wHiCh Ifi r«* aryaplflbl^ lor 0*ily £A$3 fine WAT| Tlw 
IujIC is m powerful cumpulBr wilrl iMti ur RAM *nrj dHi> iftcUiflflS 
* tiuiUir IMn naubtn s ded T.y disk drive The 1040 haa been 
deigned 'w u44 on tunir«fi« nnrj prn1fwiior.al apcilicaitwfia 
most u\ which rtHHJi>f« a. +iiqh re4dluEir» FYiOrM^br'oma or coagur 
■nonit-of II rioifci rv>1 IharHona have; an PlF mcdulalor ioi use 
wilh a CtomflftNcTV wt Hrxlulalori. fjn bn Mtad rdr Hfl^inc WT). 

IQSfft r-J *?YtypmTi ttftEEifvf JMpmlfr i*#* UK Wri" 

EkOST-f ffi^wrtf f rt^*p SUF^iap^aajfiihx Oasr fit* WTV 

if ,f«ij w«»jka ni« !Lnrf«i eartain ii\ iha 1MD3TF rwom ttM uxa>w> btiow. 

MEGA STs NOW IN STOCK 

Far llw u»> wtiO r«|L>irea 9i»|i <!i«f« HA« |h?n (ti» 5W or I MO 
STi alf«r, lie new MEGA ST tunuuie'fl B'« now *«piiih* 
T Imrc Jrn 1»a MEGA ST'i, one wilh. 2Mb ul RAM trill in? Slhfr 
wilh a ittjs&iiw 4Mb Holh now ciynpulcrs are lullr rarnpbtible 
••ih ^icisiirvg ST'R Jincl run ci.rrfinlly oval able ST aclswere The 
MEGA ST J d/e ttyfed- Mi aii Rtpancunla: Oanlrv fraceaaii>g 
uim wiih m>en archiwciiwe ami * oeiwrmbi? h«yuo«ra r t.m 
ara aupul «r wilh GEM. m \rix mcutt CMINHnr arm *ll »«1r*l 
a« Milli ihfl Fi?a dt 104ft P tcm in as foflfcHta: 
w.-;a .«. r An. fl«4ujtir - cm/ Htewd 

Mf(i* & t am mnmm • m." ,"i«riM i*™ HmiLn- Hn^mfl 

«fO* iT «Hti lUttmnf ' Ctif - tilMtincUtT) 

UE 0* S? 4Mb KttOartl ■ OV ' 3WITS WrcHvMUf OJHiJiir VMJJ 

II dm .iHjki like lumer (Mala ar Iha ME(S* ST a. i*™ *w kmk" HNsa 



ATARI 



■ To: Silica Shop Ltd , D*pt PSIX 038S, 1 -4 The Mews. Hafhwley Road , Sidcup, Kent. DAI 4 4DX \ 

I PLEASE SEND ME FREE LITERATURE ON THE ATARI ST 

Mr Mrs/Ms 



Initials: 



Surname: 



Address: 



I 
I 

I 

I Do jrOu nirr»dy Own e compuier 
V> n so. which on* do you own? 



Postcode: 



WIN A WINTER OLYMPIC HOLIDAY 
WORTH MORE THAN £2000 



\ 



1 



i 



BjqJ'l^**^^"*****^ 



tffit 









i 



«*]| 



WINTER OLYMPICS '88 

Winter Olympics '88 is 
undoubtedly the best winter sports 
simulation to date. It features the 
classic winter Olympic events; 
Ski Slalom, Giant Slalom, Two man 
1 bob, Ski-Jump, Biathalon and Speed 
Skating. These have been depicted 
[ in a way not seen on any home 

I computer before. The result is a 
phenomenally realistic and 
spell-binding game, 
Available on the following formats: 
CBM64, BBC/ELECTRON, 
ATARI £9.95 
SPECTRUM, AMSTRAD, 
CI6/+4£7.95 
DISK -BBC £14.95 
MASTER COMPACT £ 14.95 
I ATARI 8 BIT £14.95 

ST. £19.95 AMIGA £19.95 
IBM £19.95 




nrMtvC a 



ADDISON INDUSTRIAL ESTATE ■ BLAYDON ■ TYr 



ARNE2I4TE TEL 091 414461 1